News | Information Technology | March 14, 2016

2016 HIMSS Survey Suggests Positive Future for Connected Health Technologies

More than half of U.S. hospitals represented currently use three or more connected health technologies, with many planning to implement additional technologies to improve engagement and quality of care

2016 HIMSS Connected Health Survey, information technology, connectivity

March 14, 2016 — The 2016 HIMSS Connected Health Survey paints an optimistic picture surrounding the emerging trend of connectivity within the healthcare ecosystem. With more than 50 percent of respondents indicating their hospital currently uses three or more connected health technologies, the high adoption rates (and other supportive statistics in the report) underscore the growing importance these technologies play in the hospital setting.

Respondents to the survey, unveiled at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) annual conference and exhibition in Las Vegas, found that the technologies implemented within hospital settings positively impacted capabilities to communicate with patients along with the ability to deliver a higher standard of care. In addition, 69 percent of respondents whose hospitals are utilizing mobile optimized patient portals indicated that the attention to a mobile environment expands the capability to send and receive data securely.

“The healthcare ecosystem is increasingly converging on patient-centric technology solutions,” said Tom Martin, Ph.D., director of healthcare information systems for HIMSS. “The role of the provider is to expand far beyond the walls of the exam room, especially as our healthcare system transitions towards value-based purchasing. The Connected Health findings illustrate the importance of interactive relationships between physicians and individuals and technology as a means to advance comprehensive health and healthcare.”

The survey was conducted in partnership with the Personal Connected Health Alliance (PCHA). Insights are reflective of 227 information technology (IT), informatics and clinical professionals in U.S. hospitals and health systems with regard to their organization’s current and future use of connected health technologies. Currently, 52 percent of hospitals indicated the use of three or more of these technologies, including:

Nearly half (47 percent) of respondents indicated their hospitals are looking to expand the array of connected health technologies they use. Another 5 percent of respondents expect their hospitals to become first-time users of at least one of the connected health technologies outlined in this report. The commonly cited technologies they plan on adding, involve:

  • Telehealth, concierge service;
  • Patient-generated health data solutions; and
  • SMS texting.

For more information: www.himss.org

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