News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 10, 2019

Achenbach to Receive Inaugural 2019 Stephan Achenbach Pioneer Award in Cardiovascular CT

SCCT award recognizes individuals who have made landmark contributions to clinical excellence, research and education in the field of cardiovascular CT

Achenbach to Receive Inaugural 2019 Stephan Achenbach Pioneer Award in Cardiovascular CT

July 10, 2019 — The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) will present Stephan Achenbach, M.D., FSCCT with the inaugural 2019 Stephan Achenbach Pioneer Award in Cardiovascular CT at the SCCT 14th Annual Scientific Meeting (SCCT2019), July 11 –14 in Baltimore. The award recognizes individuals who have made landmark contributions by demonstrating a commitment to clinical excellence, research and education to the field of cardiovascular CT.

“It is my pleasure and honor to present this new award to Dr. Stephan Achenbach, whose leadership and contributions have been unparalleled and have had a lasting and profound impact in the field of cardiovascular CT and on this society” said SCCT president Suhny Abbara, M.D., FSCCT. “We recognize his leadership and body of research and education, which has been fundamental in the advancement of computed tomography. We are privileged to recognize Stephan for his pioneering achievements and have named this award in his honor.”

Achenbach is chairman of cardiology and a professor of medicine at the University of Erlangen, Germany. His research interests focus on cardiovascular imaging, mainly computed tomography, for the early detection and characterization of coronary atherosclerosis, and for the support of coronary and cardiovascular interventional procedures.

According to Thomson Reuters, Achenbach is among the 1 percent most-cited researchers in the field of clinical medicine and he has authored approximately 550 publications listed in Medline.

He was the founding president of SCCT from 2005-2007, and is the president-elect of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Achenbach is currently a board member of ESC and served as the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (JCCT).

Achenbach has received several awards, including the Jan Brod Award for Clinical Research of the Medical School of Hannover, Germany (1999), the Thomas C. Cesario Distinguished Visiting Professorship Award from the University of California Irvine School of Medicine (2007), the Simon Dack Award from the American College of Cardiology (2009), the Gold Medal of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (2015), as well as the Sir Godfrey Hounsfield Memorial Award of the British Institute of Radiology (2016).

For more information: www.scct.org

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