News | Atrial Fibrillation | May 26, 2023

New Device Helps Prevent Complication During Common Heart Procedure

By gently diverting the esophagus, heart ablations will be safer

Emile Daoud, MD, helped develop a new surgical device at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center to prevent a common and serious complication during heart ablation procedures. The device gently moves the nearby esophagus away from the heart to prevent the ablation energy from causing damage.

May 26, 2023 — Atrial fibrillation, or AFib , is the most common heart rhythm problem, affecting millions of Americans and greatly increasing their risk of stroke and heart failure. For some with AFib, a catheter ablation is used to burn or freeze the precise area causing the problem to restore a normal heart rhythm. While this method is effective in treating AFib, the energy from the catheter tip can cause serious damage to the adjacent esophagus, which is only a few millimeters away. It’s an injury that can be life threatening, so an electrophysiologist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center helped develop a new device that gently diverts the esophagus out of harm’s way, greatly improving safety. 

“On one hand, we want to deliver high energy and spend a lot of time ablating a specific spot to get a good, deep lesion. But on the other hand, we are very cognizant of where the esophagus is and want to do everything possible to avoid damaging that structure,” said Emile Daoud, MD, electrophysiologist and clinical professor of internal medicine at the medical center. “By pulling in the esophagus using suction force and then moving the entire segment to the side by about an inch, we are able to create a safe pathway to deliver the energy to treat AFib.”

A clinical trial led by Ohio State found that without the device, over a third of heart ablation patients had esophageal injuries, but when the new device was used, less than 5% of patients had any injury to the esophagus, and they were much less severe than the control group.

“There have been attempts to protect the esophagus during heart ablations in the past using different techniques like measuring the temperature inside the esophagus, using ultrasound imaging to identify where it’s located and using shorter or less intense ablation energy, but esophageal injury continued to be a serious problem,” said Daoud. “With this device, patients can rest assured that they are getting the safest procedure possible without compromising any benefits to their heart.”

For more information: https://health.osu.edu/

Find more HRS23 conference coverage here


Related Content

News | Heart Failure

February 22, 2024 — Wake Forest University School of Medicine, the academic core of Advocate Health, is expanding ...

Home February 22, 2024
Home
News | Heart Failure

February 15, 2024 — Canary Medical, a medical data company focused on the development and commercialization of its ...

Home February 15, 2024
Home
News | Heart Failure

February 12, 2023 — A team at Allina Health Minneapolis Heart Institute at Abbott Northwestern Hospital has successfully ...

Home February 12, 2024
Home
News | Heart Failure

January 30, 2024 — Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have developed a single ...

Home January 30, 2024
Home
News | Heart Failure

January 23, 2024 — Sequana Medical NV, a pioneer in the treatment of fluid overload in liver disease, heart failure and ...

Home January 23, 2024
Home
News | Heart Failure

January 16, 2024 — Cardiac Dimensions, a leader in the development of innovative and minimally invasive treatment ...

Home January 16, 2024
Home
News | Heart Failure

November 30, 2023 — BioCardia, Inc., a developer of cellular and cell-derived therapeutics for the treatment of ...

Home November 30, 2023
Home
News | Heart Failure

November 30, 2023 — Sequana Medical NV, a pioneer in the treatment of fluid overload in liver disease, heart failure and ...

Home November 30, 2023
Home
News | Heart Failure

November 16, 2023 — Mount Sinai’s Cardiovascular Research Institute is sending bioengineered human heart muscle cells ...

Home November 16, 2023
Home
News | Heart Failure

November 16, 2023 — A smartphone app using artificial intelligence technology to detect changes in the voice of a person ...

Home November 16, 2023
Home
Subscribe Now