News | March 24, 2008

New PET-MRI Does Not Compromise Resolution, Signal

March 24, 2008 - Researchers have developed a three-dimensional scanner that combines positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in which PET spatial resolution and signal sensitivity are not compromised and MRI images are not substantially affected.

"Both modalities preserve their functionality, even when operated isochronously," the team reports in the March 24th advance online publication of Nature Medicine.

Up until now, attempts to combine the two technologies permitted only sequential data acquisition in stand-alone systems and subsequent image fusion, limiting accuracy and reproducibility. Combining PET and MRI in one system is challenging, as regular PET detectors and photomultiplier tubes are sensitive to magnetic fields.

"We are using new avalanche photodiodes (with compact silicon light sensors), which are completely based on a semiconductor structure and show therefore no interaction with the magnetic field," Bernd J. Pichler, M.D., explained in correspondence with Reuters Health.

Using mice, Dr. Pichler, at Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen in Germany, and colleagues demonstrated the complementary information that can be obtained simultaneously, such as tumor-cell proliferation and tumor necrosis and inflammation.

"The combined PET-MRI information might make histology redundant for some applications, especially for longitudinal studies of disease progression or therapy response performed in the same subject," the authors said.

They were also able to obtain PET images simultaneously with MR spectroscopic information and functional MRI data.

"I think PET/MRI is great for studies in oncology and immunology where you want to detect cells in lymph nodes or where you need good morphological information along with your PET signal," Dr. Pichler said. "Other big applications will be cardiology, where you have the advantage of simultaneous data acquisition to avoid cardiac motion artefacts, and neurology, where you can correlate different information (eg, temporal correlation of blood flow with metabolism or receptor expression)."

He noted that his team's new design for a small animal scanner is nearly ready for commercial manufacture. "We are talking with companies," he said.

"We have already a prototype human PET-MRI in Tubingen, but this is not as mature as the animal system yet," the researcher added. "It requires many more PET detectors that need to be stabilized, and we need to have all approvals for clinical applications in place. I think within the next two to three years, we will have PET/MRI scanners clinically available."

Source: Nat Med 2008 and Reuters Health

For more information: www.nature.com

Related Content

ISMRM Issues Guidelines for MRI Gadolinium Contrast Agents
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)| August 15, 2017
The International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) has provided new guidance in the use of contrast...
GE Healthcare's Signa Premier MRI Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)| August 04, 2017
GE Healthcare announced Signa Premier, a new wide bore 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, is now available...
New PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition
News | PET-CT| July 25, 2017
Using a new imaging technique that can diagnose cardiac sarcoidosis much more accurately than traditional tests,...
Cardiac CT scan showing plaque and calcification in the coronary arteries, from a Toshiba CT scanner
News | Business| July 19, 2017
July 19, 2017 — The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) created a reimbursement fee chart for cardia
Sponsored Content | Videos | Business| July 13, 2017
Randall Thompson, M.D., outlines three new CPT codes for FFR-CT, a smart phone-based single-lead ECG system and PET n
Novel PET Tracer Detects Small Blood Clots

PET images (MIP 0-60 min) of three Cynomolgus monkeys. Strong signals are detected at the sites where inserted catheters had roughened surfaces. Almost no other background signal is visible. Only accumulation in the gallbladder becomes visible at the bottom of the image. Credit: Piramal Imaging GmbH, Berlin Germany.

News | PET Imaging| July 07, 2017
Blood clots in veins and arteries can lead to heart attack, stroke and pulmonary embolism, which are major causes of...
German Workshop Highlights Possibilities of Perfusion MRI
News | Stroke| July 03, 2017
When diagnosing strokes and heart diseases or looking at tumors, perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Clinical Decision Support| June 29, 2017
Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals Syst
Toshiba Medical Introduces Vantage Titan Zen Edition MR
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)| June 27, 2017
June 27, 2017 — Toshiba Medical, a Canon Group company, introduced its newest...
Overlay Init