News | June 04, 2008

Philips, Skytron Collaborate on Hybrid Surgical Rooms for Minimally Invasive Procedures

June 5, 2008 - At the SVS Vascular Annual Meeting Royal Philips Electronics and Skytron said they are teaming up to deliver hybrid operating rooms for minimally invasive cardiovascular surgical procedures. The solution combines Philips' cardiovascular X-ray systems with Skytron's surgery room equipment to enable clinicians to treat cardiovascular patients in the same room. Increasingly, clinicians require more versatile environments that enable them to carry out complex minimally invasive interventions, according to the companies. By working together to tailor solutions to meet each customer's needs, Philips and Skytron aim to deliver operating rooms that optimize workflow whilst reducing the length of the planning and installation process. As a result, clinical staff will reportedly benefit from a more tailored and intuitive environment that has the potential to reduce costs for the care provider and decrease the amount of time the patient spends in the hospital. For more information: www.medical.philips.com, www.skytron.us

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