News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 05, 2019

SCCT Announces 2019 Gold Medal Award Recipients

Jonathon Leipsic, M.D., and Gilbert Raff, M.D., to receive society’s highest honor for landmark contributions to the field of cardiovascular computed tomography

SCCT Announces 2019 Gold Medal Award Recipients

Jonathon Leipsic, M.D., (left) and Gilbert Raff, M.D., (right)

June 5, 2019 — The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) will present the 2019 Gold Medal Award to Jonathon Leipsic, M.D., FSCCT, and Gilbert Raff, M.D., FSCCT, at the SCCT 14th Annual Scientific Meeting, July 11 – 14 in Baltimore. The SCCT Gold Medal Award recognizes outstanding leaders who have made landmark contributions to the field of cardiovascular computed tomography and to the society.

“Drs. Leipsic and Raff exemplify an outstanding commitment to the advancement of cardiovascular computed tomography through clinical excellence, and continued research and education” said SCCT President Suhny Abbara, M.D., FSCCT. “It is with great pleasure that I recognize both Drs. Leipsic and Raff with the 2019 Gold Medal Award – the highest honor bestowed by SCCT.”

Leipsic is the chairman of the department of radiology for Providence Health Care and the vice-chairman of research and a professor of radiology and cardiology for the University of British Columbia. Leipsic is also a Canada research chair in advanced cardiopulmonary imaging. He has more than 415 peer reviewed manuscripts in press or in print, more than 300 scientific abstracts, and is the editor of two textbooks. He speaks internationally on a number of cardiopulmonary imaging topics with more than 150 invited lectures in the last four years. Leipsic is a former SCCT president (2015 – 2016).

Watch the VIDEO: The Essentials of CT Transcatheter Valve Imaging, an interview with Leipsic at SCCT 2018

Watch the VIDEO: What to Look for in CT Structural Heart Planning Software, an interview with Leipsic at SCCT 2016

Raff has been practicing medicine for more than 40 years. He is the founding program manager of the Advanced Cardiovascular Imaging Consortium of Michigan and principal investigator at CT-STAT and CT-DOSE. He has had more than 300 peer-reviewed manuscripts published and has been invited to speak internationally hundreds of times. Raff is a founding board member for the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

For more information: www.scct.org

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