News | July 15, 2008

Stereotaxis Magnetic Navigation System Used to Treat Inoperable Heart Defect in 10-Year Old Patient

July 16, 2008 - Stereotaxis Inc. said today the pediatric cardiology team at the Heart and Diabetes Center of North Reinland-Westphalia in Bad Oeynhausen, Germany, successfully performed a first-of-its-kind procedure to treat pulmonary atresia in a 10-year old boy using the Niobe Magnetic Navigation System.

Pulmonary atresia is a congenital malformation of the pulmonary valve, which obstructs the flow of blood from the heart to the lungs. As a result, blood is forced to flow to the lungs through a hole in the inner wall of the heart, known as a ventricular septal defect, and around a circuitous route through small, winding vessels. The disease severely limits the efficient transport of oxygen throughout the body.

This patient had failed a previous surgical attempt to correct the atresia because there were no vessels of adequate size or quality to utilize. After two conventional catheterization attempts, the Bad Oeynhausen team, lead by Dr. Nikolaus Haas, director of the catheterization laboratory in the Heart and Diabetes Center’s Department of Congenital Heart Defects, used Stereotaxis’ software to create a 3D model of the tortuous vessels that had replaced this patient’s absent pulmonary artery. The Niobe Magnetic Navigation System then made it possible for the team to navigate a magnetic guide wire through the entire length of the difficult vessel and place a specialized stent that now permits increased blood flow from the aorta to the left lung, increasing the amount of oxygen that can be pumped around the body.

Fewer than two days after the procedure, the young patient was discharged from the hospital. Before the procedure, the patient was cyanotic, appearing blue due to insufficient oxygen supply, and could not walk 100 meters without running out of breath. Today, his color is good, and he is able to walk more than 1,000 meters before needing to rest. Dr. Hass believes the patient will experience still greater improvement after a second, planned procedure to improve blood flow to his right lung.

“With the Stereotaxis technology, we are now able to help patients whose quality of life is extremely limited by severe congenital heart defects that have few viable treatment options,” Dr. Haas said. “This patient nearly died during an earlier conventional procedure, and we thought we had exhausted our options to improve his quality of life. Based on this initial experience with the Stereotaxis System, we have already scheduled another patient with pulmonary atresia for this new procedure. In our current patient population alone there are at least 20 additional children with this disease who can benefit from the unique capabilities of the Stereotaxis technology.”

For more information: www.stereotaxis.com

Related Content

Mandatory Public Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Reporting Associated With Better Patient Outcomes
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | April 30, 2018
Mandatory public reporting of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) results in Massachusetts was associated with...
Gecko Biomedical Receives CE Mark Approval for Setalum Sealant
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | September 19, 2017
Gecko Biomedical announced it has received CE Mark approval for its Setalum Sealant, allowing the company to market its...
ClearFlow Inc. Announces Positive U.S. Clinical Trial Results
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | September 08, 2017
September 8, 2017 — ClearFlow Inc.
Videos | Cardiovascular Surgery | July 19, 2017
This video educational session, provided in partnership with the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE), is title
Intensive Glycemic Control Program Produces Significant Per-Patient Cost Savings for CABG Surgery
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | May 25, 2017
A new study from Emory University observed a near-20 percent reduction in perioperative complications, a 1.2-day...
Risk of Heart Transplant Rejection Reduced by Desensitizing Patient Antibodies
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | May 23, 2017
The risk of heart transplant rejection can be reduced by desensitizing patient antibodies, according to research...
Scientists Show How Cells React to Injury From Open-Heart Surgery
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | May 04, 2017
Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute investigators have learned how cardiac muscle cells react to a certain type of injury that...
ERACS Session Highlights Need for Standardized Best Practices in Cardiac Surgery
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | May 02, 2017
The recently formed group Enhanced Recovery After Cardiac Surgery (ERACS) hosted an organizing session in Boston on...
ClearFlow Receives Frost & Sullivan New Product Innovation Award for PleuraFlow Technology
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | May 01, 2017
ClearFlow Inc. has received the prestigious 2017 Global Frost & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation. The...
Edwards Intuity Elite sutureless aortic valve, first implants in Connecticut, WCHN, Western Connecticut Health Network
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | February 16, 2017
Western Connecticut Health Network (WCHN) cardiothoracic surgeons Cary Passik, M.D., and Robert Gallagher, M.D., were...
Overlay Init