News | Cath Lab | October 28, 2019

University Hospitals Designs the Cardiovascular Center of the Future

The Center for Advanced Heart and Vascular Care will transform patient care

Marco Costa, M.D., Ph.D., MBA, president, UH Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, performing a cath lab procedure.

Marco Costa, M.D., Ph.D., MBA, president, UH Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, performing a cath lab procedure.

October 28, 2019 — Leaders within University Hospitals and the Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute had a vision to provide the most advanced, efficient and cost-effective medical care to patients with heart and vascular disease. The opening of the new Center for Advanced Heart and Vascular Care (CAHVC) in September 2019 brings that vision to life. The hospital said this innovative care delivery system will dramatically improve the patient experience by combining the newest medical advancements, top experts and best design.

“We want our patients to have access to the most advanced care, in a frictionless manner,” said Marco Costa, M.D., Ph.D., MBA, president, UH Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute. “This new medical hub was designed to create an intersection at the core of our hospital where UH’s worldwide experts and the most advanced technologies meet. We’re not only delivering today’s care with the highest quality and value, but establishing the therapies of tomorrow.”

Advanced Imaging Technology in the Cath Lab

The CAHVC is one of the first cardiovascular centers in the world to co-locate an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and robotically operated cardiac catheterization laboratory (cath lab) with surgical capabilities (hybrid OR) in the same suite. This allows for unprecedented collaboration from doctors specializing in interventional cardiology, medical cardiology, cardiac surgery, vascular medicine, vascular surgery, anesthesia and advanced cardiovascular imaging. UH partnered with Siemens Healthineers, a leader in medical technology, to provide the MRI (Magnetom Aera 1.5T), CT (Somatom Definition Flash) and hybrid OR (Artis pheno).

 

Efficient and Cost-effective Cardiac Care

At virtually every medical facility across the country, because of its weight, advanced imaging equipment is installed in the basement or entry floors. This traditional hospital design can prolong and complicate diagnosis and treatment, as patients are required to travel through a maze of hospital hallways for multiple imaging tests before, during and after procedures. Co-locating the MRI and CT with a cath lab and hybrid OR eliminates the long rides and enables near real-time advanced imaging to guide complex procedures. The layout also allows patients to schedule imaging tests and appointments with different physician experts during one trip to the hospital, saving time and money. The convergence of expertise, state-of-the-art technology and innovative design provides patients with leading-edge heart and vascular care conveniently located in one place.

Bringing the Vision of a Futuristic Cath Lab to Life

Creating the nearly 10,000 square foot CAHVC within the existing hospital structure took complex planning, intense commitment and some creative construction. Built in the 1960s, The George M. Humphrey Building wasn’t designed to hold the massive weight of today’s advanced imaging equipment. Crews reinforced the floor to safely support the MRI and CT weighing a combined 15,000 pounds. A crane lifted the machines into the facility through the roof.

Procedures Performed in the New Hybrid Cath Lab

Doctors will perform a variety of procedures in the CAHVC, treating a range of conditions including:

   • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) for aortic stenosis
   • Transcatheter therapies for mitral valve regurgitation and heart failure (Accucinch implant)
   • MitraClip procedure for mitral regurgitation
   • TEVAR for treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms
   • Left atrial appendage (LAA) closure for non-valvular atrial fibrillation (Watchman device)
   • Implantation of mechanical support devices for patients with heart failure and cardiac shock
   • LIMFLOW for chronic limb ischemia
   • Vascular angiography for assessment of complex vascular disease 
   • Non-invasive CT angiography for coronary artery disease
   • Endovascular treatment of thoracic aneurysms and dissections
   • Hybrid cardiovascular surgery for ascending and arch aortic pathologies
   • Complex aortic procedures with branched/chimney endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR)

Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death in the United States for both men and women. Globally, nearly 50,000 people die every day from a cardiovascular disease. Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute leadership had the vision to take on this massive project, designing the environment needed to improve and extend the lives of patients.    

The new state-of-the-art Center for Advanced Heart and Vascular Care opened to patients at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center in September. 

For more information: www.UHhospitals.org

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