Technology | Clinical Decision Support | December 22, 2015

American College of Cardiology Broadens Mobile Clinical App Collection

TAVR, anticoagulation apps available to support clinicians in providing quality patient care

December 22, 2015 — The American College of Cardiology (ACC) has launched a new Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS)/ACC Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) In-Hospital Mortality Risk App and an extensively overhauled the ACC AnticoagEvaluator App, bolstering its expansive Clinical App Collection. With these new and improved apps, the ACC continues to diversify the clinical content and decision support it offers clinicians in the mobile space.

The STS/ACC TAVR In-Hospital Mortality Risk App assists clinicians in determining the predicted in-hospital mortality risk of a patient who is considering TAVR as a treatment option for aortic valve replacement. Clinicians can evaluate a patient’s mortality risk and compare it to the national average based on STS/ACC TVT Registry data. This app marks ACC’s first effort in building mobile risk applications for the ACC National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) using NCDR data and is part of ACC’s efforts to use NCDR data to improve the quality of cardiovascular care.

The AnticoagEvaluator has been completely redesigned to be more user friendly and offer additional support, including recommendations from the 2013 ACC/AHA/HRS Atrial Fibrillation Guideline. The app helps clinicians make well-informed decisions on antithrombotic therapy for non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients by allowing them to calculate a patient's renal function and risk of ischemic stroke, blood clot and bleed; generate individualized risk for antithrombotic therapy options based on individual clinical trials; and improve accurate use of direct oral anticoagulants with renal-function-adjusted dosage based on prescribing information. The app now also includes Edoxaban on the list of available anticoagulant therapies and the Cockcroft-Gault equation for calculating renal function.

The ACC will continue to expand its Clinical App Collection in 2016 with offerings based on new clinical pathways documents, appropriate use criteria, additional guideline releases, NCDR risk models and other sources. All ACC apps are free and can be found by searching their titles in the iTunes or GooglePlay app stores.

Up-to-date information about ACC’s full mobile Clinical App Collection can be found at www.acc.org/mobileresources#Clinical.

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