Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 05, 2017

Siemens Introduces Compressed Sensing Acceleration Technology for Faster MRI Scans

Enables MR imaging up to 10 times faster without compromising image quality

Compressed Sensing MRI, Siemens MRI

At RSNA 2016, Siemens Healthineers unveiled its groundbreaking Compressed Sensing technology, which overcomes a major limitation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): long acquisition times. With Compressed Sensing, MRI scans can be shortened dramatically. For example, cardiac cine imaging with Compressed Sensing can be performed in 16 seconds rather than the traditional four minutes, thanks to an innovative algorithm that reduces the amount of data required.2

 

Only Key Data Points Required

Thanks to Compressed Sensing, fewer data points are needed to provide MR images of diagnostic quality. Iterative reconstruction enables the reconstruction of high-resolution, high-quality images with no information loss. Additionally, the efficient inline reconstruction algorithm of Compressed Sensing enables a high degree of clinical throughput. The acquired data is calculated directly at the MRI scanner, requiring no export or external processing of that data.

In cardiac imaging, Compressed Sensing Cardiac Cine takes full advantage of this algorithm. Rather than hold their breath 10 to 14 times, which can take four minutes due to regenerative scan breaks, patients can now breathe freely, and the acquisition time is roughly 16 seconds. Accurate assessment of additional quantitative information such as ejection fraction requires only one breath hold. Motion artifacts caused by breathing and heartbeats are effectively avoided, which benefits older and critically ill patients who cannot hold their breath.

 

MRI for Patients With Cardiac Arrhythmias

The speed of Compressed Sensing Cardiac Cine makes cardiac MRI accessible to entirely new patient groups, including those with cardiac arrhythmias. The software is currently 510(k) pending. In the past, cardiac MRI scans were not an option for these patients due to the images’ low diagnostic quality. But thanks to the adaptive triggering of Compressed Sensing, the entire cardiac cycle – including diagnostic information regarding the late diastolic phase – can be recorded in real time with a single breath-hold. Compressed Sensing Cardiac Cine also offers excellent visualization and quantification of the left ventricle function, according to scientific studies.

The Compressed Sensing algorithm developed by Siemens Healthineers won acclaim from the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) at the 2014 Competition for Dynamic Imaging. Working with research partners, Siemens Healthineers further developed the algorithm and transformed it into a product. For years, selected customers worldwide have been using a work-in-progress (WIP) imaging package for application in research. Compressed Sensing technology has been tried and tested in multiple clinical settings, with numerous studies attesting to its advantages.

For more information: www.siemens.com/healthineers

 

Reference:
1. Kido, et al. Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (2016).

 

Related Content

Ultra-fast, less than one-minute scan time, cardiac MRI enables accurate assessment of heart anatomy and function, improves patient comfort, increases access to care, and reduces costs
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 02, 2021
July 2, 2021 — Philips has participated in an important research project to develop a...
This study found cardiac MRI gadolinium-based contrast agents are safe for patient use. Overall, there were only 556 acute adverse effects in 145,855 contrast-enhanced MRIs, with only 47 being classified as severe.

This study found cardiac MRI gadolinium-based contrast agents are safe for patient use. Overall, there were only 556 acute adverse effects in 145,855 contrast-enhanced MRIs, with only 47 being classified as severe. 

Feature | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | October 29, 2020
October 29, 2020 — Contrast agents used to improve views of the heart on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) carry a ver
Chest X-ray, posteroanterior view, of a 79-year-old man with history of a previous pacemaker, with abandoned right atrial and right ventricular pacing leads on the right side at time of new cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator implant on the left side. Arrows indicate a nodular opacity in the right midlung concerning for mass. Find more images of patients in this study in Radiology: Cardiothoracic Imaging.

Chest X-ray from a patient included in the study. Posteroanterior view, of a 79-year-old man with history of a previous pacemaker, with abandoned right atrial and right ventricular pacing leads on the right side at time of new cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator implant on the left side. Arrows indicate a nodular opacity in the right midlung concerning for mass. Find more images of patients in this study in Radiology: Cardiothoracic Imaging.

Feature | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | October 27, 2020
October 27, 2020 – Magn...
Cardiac MR, also called cardiac MRI or heart MRI, can offer data above and beyond anatomical imaging.

Cardiac MR can offer data above and beyond anatomical imaging, which is the main reason why this system was installed at Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital in Dallas. The system is a dedicated heart MRI scanner.

Feature | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 19, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Videos | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | December 20, 2019
James Carr, M.D., chair of the Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, and incoming 2020 President of the...
Greater Left Ventricular Mass Increases Risk of Heart Failure
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | October 21, 2019
Elevated left ventricular mass, known as left-ventricular hypertrophy, is a stronger predictor of coronary artery...
Heart MRI example. An example of a cardiac MRI exam showing perfusion defects in the heart muscle, amount of infarct and edema and a score for myocardial salvage which can help determine if revasularization will help restore heart function.

A example of a cardiac MRI exam showing perfusion defects in the heart muscle, amount of infarct and edema and a score for myocardial salvage, which can help determine if revasularization will restore heart function following a heart attack.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | October 07, 2019
October 7, 2019 – A recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine supports the use of
Machine Learning Could Offer Faster, More Precise Cardiac MRI Scan Results
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 25, 2019
Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis can be performed significantly faster with similar precision to...
Haojie Wang, M.D., director of advanced cardiovascular MRI and a member of the heart valve clinic at Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital, Dallas. His hospital installed a dedicated cardiac Siemens 1.5T MRI scanner in 2018 because MRI offers soft tissue visualization not available on CT or ultrasound.

Haojie Wang, M.D., director of advanced cardiovascular MRI and a member of the heart valve clinic at Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital, Dallas. His hospital installed a dedicated cardiac Siemens 1.5T MRI scanner in 2018 because MRI offers soft tissue visualization not available on CT or ultrasound.

Feature | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 06, 2019 | Jeff Zagoudis, Associate Editor
Traditionally, computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound have been the workhorse imaging modalities in the world of car