Technology | April 18, 2011

Ultrasound Upgrades Enhance Imaging, Workflow

April 18, 2011 – Enhancing imaging capabilities and improving workflow are paramount in today’s demanding ultrasound environment. To meet these ongoing needs, Toshiba America Medical Systems has introduced upgrades across its ultrasound product line and showcased these upgrades at the American Institute of Ultrasound Medicine (AIUM) annual convention.

The latest features available on the Aplio XG, Aplio MX, Xario XG and Viamo systems include Auto IMT, 4-D imaging improvements and workflow protocol enhancements. Additional upgrades to the Viamo include ApliPure, TissuePure Imaging and DICOM structured reporting.

“The upgrades offered across Toshiba’s ultrasound product line are designed to further enhance clinical capability and productivity, ultimately allowing clinicians to diagnose more patients in a shorter period of time and improve overall workflow,” said Tomohiro Hasegawa, director, ultrasound business unit, Toshiba.

Auto-IMT (available on the Aplio XG, Aplio MX and Xario XG ultrasound systems) can determine the thickness of the near and far arterial walls from three segments of the carotid artery: at an optimal angle of incidence and two complementary planes. Auto-IMT traces the two complementary planes automatically and calculates the distance between them in order to help with early detection and monitoring of cardiovascular disease. Auto-IMT uses the collected images following the American Society of Echocardiography’s (ASE) consensus statement for the diagnosis.

Toshiba is improving 4-D image quality across its ultrasound line to enable clinicians to see all dimensions of the anatomy being imaged more clearly and accurately. During biopsies, 4-D imaging allows for more accurate guidance of the biopsy needle. Precise visualization of the needle path creates safer exams and reduces potential complications.

Workflow enhancements, including the easy setup of protocols that streamline the imaging process for many routine exams, can be customized to the customer’s workflow. The protocols standardize image output and increase exam efficiency by reducing the number of tasks per exam. Sonographers have the ability to add custom annotations and reshuffle images. Sonographers can exit the protocol when additional images are required and re-enter at the same place to continue the protocol with just the click of a button.

Finally, the company offers upgrades to the Viamo, with advanced radiology capabilities, previously unavailable on point-of-care systems. These upgrades include ApliPure, TissuePure Imaging and DICOM structured reporting. The new upgrades enable clinicians to perform advanced exams with greater image definition and clinical accuracy without compromising on patient access, making it ideal for high-end radiology, vascular and OB/GYN exams and procedures at patients’ bedsides. Its portability and exceptional imaging performance raise the bar in the rapidly growing point-of-care markets, such as interventional radiology, emergency medicine and anesthesia.

Viamo also offers the ability to interchange Toshiba transducers from other ultrasound systems, such as the Aplio MX, thus improving productivity and flexibility while saving healthcare costs by reducing the need to purchase multiple transducers. Additionally, a new industry-best 40-cm depth setting allows imaging of even the toughest of patients.

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

Related Content

Dr. Bijoy Khandheria, a cardiologist from Aurora Health in Milwaukee, explains a cardiac echo image with a patient.

Dr. Bijoy Khandheria, a cardiologist from Aurora Health in Milwaukee, explains a cardiac echo image with a patient during the Fox video segment. 

News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | February 09, 2018
Fox Business News featured GE Healthcare’s ultrasound technologies in a 6-minute segment with the Innovations program
ASE Opens Enrollment for ImageGuideEcho Registry
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | January 29, 2018
January 29, 2018 — The American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) announced that ImageGuideEcho, a module under the I
New Vascular Ultrasound Registry Looks to Enhance Patient Care
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | January 17, 2018
The Society for Vascular Ultrasound (SVU), the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and Medstreaming-M2S announced the...
New International Report Provides Comprehensive Guide to Imaging in Chagas Heart Disease
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | January 03, 2018
Chagas disease (ChD), an infectious parasitic disease transmitted primarily by triatomine insects, has become a...
Bay Labs Completes $5.5 Million Series A Financing for AI-Driven Ultrasound
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | December 21, 2017
December 21, 2017 — Bay Labs, a medical technology company applying...
ASNC and ASE Team Up to Expand ImageGuide Registry
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | October 12, 2017
The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) and the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) jointly announced...
Videos | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | October 12, 2017
Sharon Mulvagh, M.D., FRCPC, FACC, FAHA, FASE, professor, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Dalhousie U
Siemens Healthineers Receives FDA Clearance for TrueFusion Structural Heart Disease Feature
Technology | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | September 06, 2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared TrueFusion, a new cardiovascular application from Siemens...
GE’s blood speckle imaging (BSI) software shows the flow of blood cells’ trajectories. It is a form of blood vector flow imaging.

GE’s blood speckle imaging (BSI) software offers the ability to view a graphical representation of the blood cells’ trajectories.

News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | September 01, 2017
Cardiologists are constantly on the lookout for new methods to examine the heart using new imaging technology advance
Videos | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 30, 2017
This video educational session, provided in partnership with the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE), is title
Overlay Init