Feature | April 02, 2014

Are Statins Good For Your Love Life?

Popular cholesterol-lowering drugs may offer added benefit for men with erectile dysfunction

April 2, 2014 — Statins are associated with a significant improvement in erectile function, a fact researchers hope will encourage men who need statins to reduce their risk of heart attack to take them, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session.

Erectile dysfunction is common in older men, especially among those with cardiovascular risk factors where cholesterol-lowering statins are frequently prescribed. Previous research has suggested a negative association between statin therapy and testosterone levels, leading to questions about the effects of these widely used medications on the quality of erection.

In the first meta-analysis of previous studies on erectile dysfunction and statins, researchers identified 11 randomized, controlled trials that measured erectile function using the International Inventory of Erectile Function — a self-administered survey with five questions, each scored on a five-point scale and totaled, with lower values representing poorer sexual function. Analysis of all 11 studies combined found a statistically significant effect of statins on erectile function in men who had both high cholesterol and erectile dysfunction. Overall, erectile function scores increased by 3.4 points in men who took statins (from 14.0 to 17.4, a 24.3 percent increase).

“The increase in erectile function scores with statins was approximately one-third to one-half of what has been reported with drugs like Viagra, Cialis or Levitra,” said John B. Kostis, M.D., director of the Cardiovascular Institute and associate dean for Cardiovascular Research at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and the lead investigator of the clinical study.

“It was larger than the reported effect of lifestyle modification,” Kostis said. “For men with erectile dysfunction who need statins to control cholesterol, this may be an extra benefit.”

Researchers believe that statins may work to improve erectile function by helping blood vessels dilate properly and improving vascular blood flow to the penis, which is often restricted in men with erectile dysfunction. While statins are not recommended as a primary treatment for erectile dysfunction in patients with healthy cholesterol levels, the added benefit may encourage more men who need statins to take them. Millions of Americans are prescribed statins to prevent heart disease, but some stop taking the medication or take less than the prescribed dose, Kostis said. Rather than preventing the possibility of a heart attack in the future, the more immediate benefit of improving erectile function might improve adherence to statin therapy, he added.

Erectile dysfunction affects an estimated 18 million to 30 million men and occurs more often in men over the age of 40. Common causes include heart disease, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, tobacco use, depression and stress.

Kostis said that larger randomized controlled trials are needed to further investigate the link between statin therapy and erectile function.

This study will be simultaneously published online in the Journal of Sexual Medicine at the time of presentation.

For more information: CardioSource.org

 

Related Content

Biotronik, BioMonitor 2 implantable cardiac monitor, BioInsight clinical study, first patients enrolled
News | Implantable Cardiac Monitor (ICM)| January 20, 2017
Biotronik has enrolled the first patients in the BioInsight clinical study evaluating the safety and feasibility of...
ICDs, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, University of Alabama at Birmingham study, Circulation
News | Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICD)| January 18, 2017
A new study published in Circulation has found there is a 23 percent risk in reduction of all-cause mortality in non-...
stress, brain activity, cardiovascular risk, PET-CT, MGH, ISSMS, The Lancet study
News | Cardiac Diagnostics| January 18, 2017
A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISSMS) investigators...
electronic health records, EHR, warfarin therapy management, University of Missouri Health Care, blood thinner
News | Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies| January 17, 2017
Warfarin is a commonly prescribed blood thinner used to prevent harmful blood clots. However, the drug requires...
ICDs, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, survival rate, elderly patients, JACC study
News | Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICD)| January 17, 2017
Of patients over age 65 who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) after surviving sudden cardiac...
University of Utah, Frank Sachse, heart failure, LVAD implantation, left ventricular assist device, biomarker, t-system

Two patients may seem equally sick based upon clinical measures, but differences in their heart physiology could predict who has the potential to recover from heart failure. A study carried out by scientists at the University of Utah finds that patients whose hearts have flattened t-tubules have a decreased chance of showing signs of recovery after implanting a mechanical heart pump. Ordinarily, t-tubules in the heart are long, thin, and rounded. Image courtesy of Frank Sachse.

News | Cardiac Diagnostics| January 17, 2017
Investigators at the University of Utah have identified distinct differences in the hearts of advanced heart failure...
Synergy stent, abluminal polymer DES, bioresorbable polymer DES, bioresorbable polymer metallic stent

The Synergy stent is the first FDA cleared drug-eluting stent to use a bioresorbable polymer drug carrier. When the polymer dissolves after about four months, the devices become a bare metal stent. The technology is supposed to reduce the rate of late stent thrombosis due to vessel inflammation caused by durable polymers.

Feature | Stents Bioresorbable| January 17, 2017 | Dave Fornell
One of the big advancements in drug-eluting stent (DES) technology has been the development of bioresorbable polymers
St. Jude Medical, Amplatzer Amulet LAA Occluder, observational study, TCT 2016
News | Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) Occluders| November 03, 2016
St. Jude Medical Inc. presented favorable results from the largest observational study to date of the company’s...
Medtronic, CoreValve Evolut R TAVR system, U.S. IDE Study, TCT 2016
News | Heart Valve Technology| November 03, 2016
Medtronic plc unveiled new clinical data showing that patients treated with the self-expanding CoreValve Evolut R...
open-heart surgery, PCI, percutaneous coronary intervention, NOBLE trial, left main coronary artery disease, LMCAD, TCT 2016
News | Cardiovascular Surgery| November 03, 2016
Coronary artery bypass (CABG) surgery is the standard treatment for revascularization in patients with left main...
Overlay Init