Feature | June 23, 2010

The Benefits of Transradial Access

Radial access is very popular outside the United States because it offers improved safety, comfort and cost savings over femoral access, which is the current U.S. standard of care. Femoral access site recovery usually involves heavy, uncomfortable compression of the leg. Patients are also required to lay on their back, in bed and not move for hours to ensure proper hemostasis. These discomforts are eliminated with radial access.

Most importantly, the risk of bleeding and arterial damage, the most common complications following these procedures, is essentially eliminated with the transradial approach, said Jack P. Chen, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, FCCP, director of cardiac research, St. Joseph’s Translational Research Institute, Saint Joseph’s Heart and Vascular Institute, Atlanta. He also directs a course to train cardiologists on the transradial technique.

“If you talk to any patient who has gone through a transfemoral procedure, they will tell you the worst thing is after the procedure. That’s what patients dread the most,” Chen told Diagnostic and Invasive Cardiology. “Most patients complain of the bed rest, the back pain, muscle spasms and the tremendous amount of pressure applied to their groin by a clamp or a staff member. You can spend three hours performing a complex, multidevice, multivessel bifurcation rotablator/stent case with an excellent result, but what the patient will remember is the pain from the pseudoaneurysm repair they now need.”
Radial access eliminates this vascular access risk, as well as the pain and discomfort associated with hours of bed rest, Chen said. “There is no question patients prefer this,” Chen explained.

With patients who have undergone both radial and femoral access procedures, Chen said the vast majority will never let him touch their legs again. This type of patient satisfaction has spread by word of mouth and has led to an increasing number of patients seeking radial access procedures at St. Joseph’s. “My patients are the procedure’s and my best advocates,” Chen said.

In March 2010, St. Joseph's Hospital of Atlanta opened the first transradial access recover lounge in the United States. It replaces beds with chairs and patients are encouraged to walk around, get coffee, check their e-mail and read.

Related Content

New Alliance Announced Between Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics and VEITHsymposium
News | Cath Lab | June 20, 2019
VEITHsymposium and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) announced an alliance between Transcatheter...
Novel Index Accurately Predicts PCI Success Post-Procedure Compared to Established Measurement Metrics
News | Cath Lab | June 19, 2019
Results from a comprehensive analysis demonstrate the effectiveness of measuring a non-hyperemic pressure ratio (NHPR...
Philips Healthcare, Volcano IVUS showing an implanted stent. IVUS might offer an alternative to contrast angiography in patients with acute kidney disease (AKD).
News | Cath Lab | June 14, 2019
June 14, 2019 – A late-breaking study examined the effects of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guided drug-eluting ste
Videos | Cath Lab | May 20, 2019
This is a walk through of the primary structural heart hybrid cath lab at...
Mobility May Predict Elderly Heart Attack Survivors' Repeat Hospital Stays
News | Cath Lab | April 23, 2019
Determining which elderly heart attack patients take longer to stand from a seated position and walk across a room may...
FDA Releases New Guidance on Medical Devices Containing Nitinol
News | Cath Lab | April 18, 2019
April 18, 2019 — The U.S.
Angiography shows a stenotic lesion in the mid right coronary artery, undilatable by standard high-pressure balloon angioplasty (inset, arrowheads). (B) Optical coherence tomography (OCT) cross-sectional (top) and longitudinal (bottom) images acquired before IVL and coregistered to the OCT lens (arrow in A) demonstrate severe near-circumferential calcification in the area of the stenosis. (C) Angiography demonstrates improvement in the area of stenosis after IVL lithoplasty.

Figure 2: Angiography demonstrates a stenotic lesion in the mid right coronary artery, undilatable by standard high-pressure balloon angioplasty (inset, arrowheads). (B) Optical coherence tomography (OCT) cross-sectional (top) and longitudinal (bottom) images acquired before IVL and coregistered to the OCT lens (arrow in A) demonstrate severe near-circumferential calcification (double-headed arrow) in the area of the stenosis. (C) Angiography demonstrates improvement in the area of stenosis after IVL (inset; note the cavitation bubbles generated by IVL [black arrows]). (D) OCT cross-sectional (top) and longitudinal (bottom) images acquired post-IVL and coregistered to the OCT lens (white arrow in C) demonstrate multiple calcium fractures and large acute luminal gain. (E) Angiography demonstrates complete stent expansion with the semicompliant stent balloon (inset) without the need for high-pressure noncompliant balloon inflation. (F) OCT cross-sectional (top) and longitudinal (bottom) images acquired post-stenting and coregistered to the OCT lens (arrow in E) demonstrate further fracture displacement (arrow), with additional increase in the acute area gain (5.17 mm2), resulting in full stent expansion and minimal malapposition.

Feature | Cath Lab | April 15, 2019 | Dean Kereiakes, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, and Jonathan Hill, M.D., DISRUPT CAD III Co-Principal Investigators
Over the last 40 years, despite multiple advancements in percutaneous coronary interventions, calcified lesions remai
BIOTRONIK’s PK Papyrus covered coronary stent. The stent ius used in emergency coronary artery dissections to repair the vessel wall.
Technology | Cath Lab | April 15, 2019
April 15, 2019 — Biotronik began its U.S.
Overlay Init