Feature | May 17, 2013

First Implant Made for Barostim neo Device to Treat Hypertension

It is designed to use the body's own natural blood flow regulation system to treat hypertension.

May 17, 2013 — Prof. Dr. Béla Merkely and Dr. Péter Sótonyi at Semmelweis Egyetem Kardiológiai Központ in Hungary completed the first patient implant of the Barostim neo device for hypertension. Barostim neo is a small, easy to implant device manufactured by CVRx.

Barostim neo is designed to use the body's own natural blood flow regulation system to treat hypertension. The system works by electrically activating baroreceptors, the body's natural blood pressure sensors that regulate cardiovascular function. When the Barostim neo is activated, signals are sent through neural pathways to the brain, which responds by telling the arteries to relax, the heart to slow down and the kidneys to reduce fluid in the body, lowering excessive blood pressure and workload on the heart.

“Barostim Therapy will provide clinical benefits to our patients in a cost-effective manner. Studies on the device have shown significant, sustained blood pressure reduction which can help reduce the health risks associated with hypertension, such as stroke and kidney failure, and help improve an individual's quality of life,” said Merkely, director at Semmelweis Egyetem Kardiológiai Központ

Barostim neo is a second-generation device that uses CVRx-patented technology that is designed to trigger the body's own natural blood flow regulation system to treat hypertension and heart failure. The system works by electrically activating the baroreceptors, the body's natural blood pressure sensors that regulate cardiovascular function. These baroreceptors are located on the carotid artery. When activated by Barostim neo, signals are sent through neural pathways to the brain, which responds by telling the:

  • Arteries to relax, making it easier for blood to flow through the body and reducing cardiac exertion;
  • Heart to slow down, allowing more time for the organ to fill with blood; and
  • Kidneys to reduce fluid in the body, lowering both excessive blood pressure and workload on the heart.

This patented technology has the potential to improve quality of life and reduce health risks associated with hypertension and heart failure, including heart and kidney disease, stroke and death. Other potential benefits of Barostim neo include that it:

  • Can be adjusted to meet each patient's individual therapy needs, making it the only personalized medical device therapy for the treatment of hypertension with a CE marking;
  • Is a non-destructive reversible treatment; and
  • Provides 100% compliance to treatment, by automatically and continuously activating the baroreflex.

 

For more information: www.cvrx.com

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