Feature | July 09, 2013

New Correlation for Increased Mortality Associated with Transcatheter Valve Replacement

July 9, 2013 — Researchers have announced the results of a clinical study that shows a key difference in the patient’s baseline heart size and function following transcatheter valve replacement (TAVR) that may help predict their medical outcomes. Previous work by these researchers showed that even mild paravalvular aortic regurgitation (PAR), detected by echocardiograms performed on these patients, appears to correlate with increased mortality. The current study revealed that certain baseline characteristics found on the echocardiograms could help predict which patients were more likely to have PAR.

“This is an exciting discovery that will help us better stratify patients for closer follow-up care,” said Rebecca Hahn, M.D., FASE, the study’s primary investigator. Hahn and her colleagues analyzed 465 patients from the PARTNER trial, combined with another 1,757 patients to show the association between increased PAR and the significant difference in baseline echo parameters. The patients’ echocardiograms indicated larger ventricular volumes and mass, lower ejection fractions and more regurgitant valvular disease, all of which appear to be harbingers of underlying issues that influenced the patient’s long-term outcome following the procedure.

Researchers on the study, "Differences in Baseline Echo Parameters in Patients with Varying Severity of Paravalvular Regurgitation Following Transcatheter Valve Replacement," included Rebecca Hahn, Susheel Kodali, Mathew Williams, Tom McAndrew and Martin Leon from Columbia University, New York, N.Y.; Pamela S. Douglas from Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C.;  Philippe Pibarot from Laval University, Quebec, QC, Canada; William Stewart from the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio; and Neil Weissman from Medstar Health Research Institute, Washington, D.C.

For more information: www.asecho.org

Related Content

Heavily calcified coronary arteries seen on a CT scan of the heart. Research at the New York Institute of Technology will create blood flow modeling to show the impact of calcium in arteries as part of a project to develop treatments to remove calcium.

Heavily calcified coronary arteries seen on a CT scan of the heart. Research at the New York Institute of Technology will create blood flow modeling to show the impact of calcium in arteries as part of a project to develop treatments to remove calcium. 

News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | January 27, 2021
January 27, 2021 — A New York Institute of Technology research te
Hershey's Chocolate display with samples and coco pods at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2012 annual meeting. The company was making the case that chocolate can be good for your heart, which is now supported by several studies. Photo by Dave Fornell

Hershey's Chocolate display with samples and coco pods at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2012 annual meeting. The company was making the case that chocolate can be good for your heart, which is now supported by several studies. Photo by Dave Fornell

News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | July 22, 2020
July 22, 2020 — Eating chocolate at least once a week is linked with a reduced risk of heart disease, according to re
The first 3-D images have been created of an RNA molecule known as "Braveheart" for its role in transforming stem cells into heart cells. Credit: Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory

The first 3-D images have been created of an RNA molecule known as "Braveheart" for its role in transforming stem cells into heart cells. Credit: Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory

News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | January 20, 2020
January 20, 2020 — Scientists at Los Alamos and international partners have created the first 3-D images of a special
Top Cardiology New in 2019 From the European Society of Cardioloigy (ESC)
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | December 23, 2019
Environmental and lifestyle issues were popular this year, with pick up from both...
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | November 26, 2019
November 26, 2019 — The University of Connecticut (UConn) Department of Kinesiology and Hartford Healthcare have sele
FDA Issues Final Guidance on Live Case Presentations During IDE Clinical Trials
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | July 10, 2019
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued the final guidance “Live Case Presentations During Investigational...
Veradigm Partners With American College of Cardiology on Next-generation Research Registries
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | July 03, 2019
The American College of Cardiology (ACC) has partnered with Veradigm, an Allscripts business unit, to power the next...
New FDA Proposed Rule Alters Informed Consent for Clinical Studies
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | November 19, 2018
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to add an exception to informed consent requirements for...
A key slide from Elnabawi's presentation, showing cardiac CT plaque evaluations, showing the impact of psoriasis medication on coronary plaques at baseline and one year of treatment. It shows a reversal of vulnerable plaque development. #SCAI, #SCAI2018

A key slide from Elnabawi's presentation, showing cardiac CT plaque evaluations, showing the impact of psoriasis medication on coronary plaques at baseline and one year of treatment. It shows a reversal of vulnerable plaque development.  

Feature | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | May 14, 2018
May 14, 2018 – New clinical evidance shows common therapy options for psoriasis (PSO), a chronic inflammatory skin di