Feature | March 29, 2011

New Study Shows WBR Halves SPECT Dose, Acquisition Time

Wide beam reconstruction (WBR) reduces both dose and image acquisition time by 50 percent for myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPI), according to a new study published in the March-April 2011 issue of the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology. WBR is a software program by UltraSPECT for reconstructing nuclear medicine images. Researchers found that with either half the dose of Tc-99m sestamibi or half the acquisition time, WBR resulted in image quality superior to processing with today’s widely used OSEM (Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization) software. The study was conducted at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City.

“The escalating radiation levels of today’s advanced imaging exams is causing growing concern among the medical community and the public at large,” said Gordon DePuey, lead researcher and M.D., director of nuclear medicine at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital and Professor of Radiology at Columbia University. “There is significant pressure to minimize radiation dose, particular for MPI nuclear SPECT exams.”

In addition, the ongoing shortages of radiopharmaceuticals due to nuclear reactor downtime compound the need to minimize dosage. WBR’s reconstruction algorithm incorporating depth-dependent resolution recovery and image noise modeling to deliver a higher quality image with lower count density data. In the new MPI study, researchers evaluated images from 156 patients undergoing myocardial perfusion SPECT with a standard full-time acquisition protocol processed with routine OSEM methods.

The same patients underwent half-time acquisition, and the data were processed with the WBR algorithm. The images were acquired both at rest and following exercise or pharmacologic stress. A second study group of 160 patients received half of the standard radiopharmaceutical dose, with images acquired for the full standard acquisition time. These were processed using WBR only. All images were rated for quality by two observers unaware of the acquisition and processing methods. For both the lower dose and abbreviated acquisition time images, grading parameters included myocardial count density and uniformity, endocardial and epicardial edge definition, visualization and definition of the right ventricle and background noise. For the abbreviated acquisition time images only, SPECT perfusion defects also were examined. Overall, WBR half-time and half-dose image quality was judged as superior to OSEM image quality in both arms of the study. There was no statistically significant difference between the two SPECT protocols in identifying the extent or severity of perfusion defects.

“The results of this study demonstrate that WBR is a powerful means of reducing dose without sacrificing image quality and diagnostic accuracy,” DePuey said. “I would recommend that all nuclear medicine laboratories adopt some strategy for reducing patient radiation exposure incorporating WBR or others techniques that have proven effective.”

DePuey notes that new SPECT cameras with multiple focused detectors are another effective dose-reduction solution. “Wide beam reconstruction technology, however, is a software-only solution,” he says. “For sites unable to budget for a major hardware acquisition, WBR provides an equally effective, more affordable answer.”

For more information: www.ultraspect.com

Related Content

Australian Team Finds New Method for Producing PET Radiotracers in Higher Radiochemical Yields
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers| April 28, 2017
Researchers at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) have led the development of a new...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Nuclear Imaging| April 28, 2017
David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American S

Physicians will need to use a CMS-certified appropriate use criteria (AUC) clinical decision support software that documents the appropriateness of an imaging order to receive full reimbursement for Medicare patients starting Jan. 1, 2018.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging| April 18, 2017 | Dave Fornell
As part of U.S. healthcare reform efforts, starting Jan.
University of Missouri Research Reactor Files to Start U.S. Production of Medical Isotopes
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers| April 13, 2017
The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) and its partners Nordion and General Atomics (GA), announced in...
IBA Molecular and Mallinckrodt Nuclear Medicine Merge to Become Curium
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers| April 11, 2017
April 11, 2017 — IBA Molecular announced that it has merged with previous acquisition Mallinckrodt...
GE Healthcare, HealthTrust, supply agreement, nuclear imaging, radiopharmaceuticals
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers| April 05, 2017
April 5, 2017 — GE Healthcare has signed an agreement with HealthTrust, a group purchasing organization headquartered
Northwestern Memorial Hospital, MR-PET scanner, first in Illinois, Siemens Biograph mMR
News | PET-MRI| March 31, 2017
March 31, 2017 — Northwestern Memorial Hospital is now home to the Chicago area's first combined magnetic resonance (
PET imaging, atherosclerotic plaque, inflammation, Ga-68-pentixafor, Technishe Universitat Munchen, Germany

Note the high uptake of Ga-68-pentixafor on multi-planar reconstructions in the organs expressing CXCR4 such as the spleen (red arrows) and adrenal glands (yellow arrows), which was nearly completely blocked by the pre-injection of AMD 3100, a potent CXCR4 inhibitor. Strong accumulation of Ga-68-pentixafor was also found in the kidneys (asterisks) reflecting the renal clearance of the tracer. In addition, high, focal activities were detected in the abdominal aorta (red arrowheads) and right carotid artery (orange arrowheads) of atherosclerotic rabbits, whereas no significant signal could be detected in the non-injured left carotid artery (white arrowheads) of atherosclerotic and control rabbits, as well as in the abdominal aorta and right carotid artery of control rabbits. Furthermore, focal activities detected with PET in atherosclerotic plaques of the abdominal aorta and the right carotid artery decreased significantly when the same rabbit was re-imaged after blocking CXCR4 receptors. Image courtesy of Fabien Hyafil, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany

News | PET Imaging| March 03, 2017
In the featured article of the March 2017 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers demonstrate that a new...
Nuclear cardiology, nuclear imaging, radiotracer production, automated radiosynthesis module, myocardial perfusion imaging
Feature | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers| March 01, 2017 | Anamika Kumari
Huge portions of the globally produced radiotracers find their origin within geographically centralized, commercial r
GE Healthcare, Rapiscan stress imaging agent, North America, Rapidscan Pharma Solutions Inc.
News | Pharmaceuticals| February 07, 2017
GE Healthcare’s Life Sciences business announced in January that it acquired Rapidscan Pharma Solutions Inc., which has...
Overlay Init