Feature | November 13, 2013

SCAI Highlights Radial Access Best Practices

More interventional cardiologists are performing transradial angioplasty, sparking need for guidance to prevent complications and optimize patient care

cath lab radial access SCAI
November 13, 2013 — The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) published a first-of-its-kind paper defining best practices for the use of the transradial approach for diagnosing and treating blocked heart arteries. Published online in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions (CCI), the recommendations aim to ensure high-quality patient care as transradial access becomes the preferred technique for catheter-based procedures. Studies show a decreased risk for bleeding and vascular complications, increased patient satisfaction and reduced costs when the transradial approach is used.
  
“While there are a number of benefits to transradial over transfemoral approaches, there are risks associated with any procedure. By emphasizing proper training and highlighting best practices, we aim to ensure that patients receive the advantages of this approach while minimizing any potential complications,” said Sunil Rao, M.D., FSCAI, associate professor of medicine, Duke University and lead author of the consensus statement.
 
In developing this statement, SCAI focused on three core areas to guide physicians:
 
Best practices for avoiding blocked blood flow to the radial (wrist) artery:
Patients should be assessed prior to discharge and at the first post-procedure visit to avoid the potential for radial artery occlusion (RAO), where blood flow to the artery is blocked. Extra care also should be taken to ensure patients receive all relevant strategies for prevention of RAO.
 
Best practices for reducing potential radiation exposure to patient and operators:
To reduce the risk of exposure to radiation during a transradial procedure, the patient’s accessed arm should be placed next to his or her torso. Additional extension tubing should be used and operators should be cognizant of safe radiation protocols.
 
Best practices for physicians transitioning to the transradial approach when treating heart attack:
Studies have shown benefits when patients suffering a heart attack undergo angioplasty via the wrist.  Steps must be taken to ensure physicians have mastered the technique before performing emergency cases routinely from the wrist. This learning process includes understanding when to revert to access through the femoral (groin) artery and how to ensure that using the radial approach does not result in delayed treatment or increased door-to-balloon time.
  
Fore more information: www.scai.org

Related Content

Technology | Radial Access| February 17, 2017
Medtronic plc announced that its coronary portfolio will now include the DxTerity Diagnostic Angiography Catheter line...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Inventory Management| February 17, 2017
The supplies you use in your cath lab are complex and very valuable.
Mercator MedSystems, DANCE trial data, ISET, LINC, Bullfrog Micro-Infusion Device
News | Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD)| February 15, 2017
Mercator MedSystems announced that the national co-principal investigators of the company’s DANCE trial each presented...
Cardinal Health survey, hospital staff, supply chain management, quality of care
News | Inventory Management| February 15, 2017
Better hospital supply chain management leads to better quality of care and supports patient safety, according to a new...
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Amplatzer PFO Occluder, first implementation
News | Structural Heart Occluders| February 15, 2017
Doctors at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have implemented the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-...
Biotronik, PRO-Kinetic Energy cobalt chromium coronary stent system, FDA approval
Technology | Stents Bare Metal| February 15, 2017
The PRO-Kinetic Energy Cobalt Chromium (CoCr) Coronary Stent System from Biotronik has gained U.S. Food and Drug...
heart team, hybird OR, structural heart team

The heart team approach was first used on a large scale in the CoreValve and Sapien TAVR trials and helped lead to excellent outcomes in high-risk patients.

Feature | Hybrid OR| February 15, 2017 | Dave Fornell
In the current era of healthcare reform and the push toward evidence-based medicine to both lower costs and improve p
HeartFlow FFRct Analysis, NICE guidance, U.K., United Kingdom, guidelines, stable chest pain
News | CT Angiography (CTA)| February 14, 2017
The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom recently issued guidance for use of...
News | Hypertension| February 13, 2017
Vascular Dynamics Inc. (VDI) announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the company’s...
 Intra-atrial shunt device (IASD) to lower left atrial pressure by creating a small left atrial to right atrial shunt.  Abraham said these devices are in early stage development with small studies to show proof of concept and demonstrate safety.

The Corvia Intra-atrial shunt device (IASD) lowers left atrial pressure by creating a small left atrial to right atrial shunt. Preliminary clinical studies have shown promise for these types of devices to improve HFpEF patient outcomes.

Feature | Heart Failure| February 10, 2017 | Dave Fornell
In the past few years there have been a number of device therapies developed to treat heart failure (HF).
Overlay Init