News | March 10, 2015

Acute Myocardial Infarction Patient Treated with New Mechanical Thrombectomy Device

Aspire system removes thrombus occluding blood vessel in coronary arteries

Aspire, Control Medical, thrombectomy, atherectomy devices, cath lab

March 10, 2015 —George Adams, M.D., an interventional cardiologist with North Carolina Heart and Vascular, successfully treated a patient having an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with the Aspire Mechanical Thrombectomy System.

The patient presented with chest pain, nausea and shortness of breath. An angiogram was performed and showed a long segment of thrombus occluding the ramus intermedius, a blood vessel in the coronary arteries. Adams used the Aspire Mechanical Thrombectomy device to remove the thrombus, and then he was able to angioplasty and stent the artery, relieving the patient from his symptoms.

"When a patient is having an AMI, removing the thrombus in the symptomatic artery is important," said Adams. "The Aspire device allows me to remove the thrombus quickly, helping to relieve the patients symptoms."

The Aspire System allows clinicians to instantly start, stop, increase, decrease, pulse or maintain thrombectomy force during the procedure. Aspire Mechanical Aspirators also aspirate up to 280ml, almost 10 times more than basic syringe systems, without multiple messy and time-consuming catheter connections, disconnections and re-connections.

The patented Aspire RX-LP6 Mechanical Thrombectomy System includes an Aspire Mechanical Aspirator (drive unit/pump) and a low-profile rapid-exchange (RX) thrombectomy catheter. Mechanical aspirators are also available alone and may be connected to any thrombectomy catheter the clinician chooses to use. Control Medical also manufactures Aspire Max Mechanical Thrombectomy Systems with larger over-the-wire (OTW) thrombectomy catheters for use in the peripheral vasculature.

For more information: www.controlmedtech.com

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