News | March 16, 2012

Art Improves Stroke Survivors' Quality of Life

March 16, 2012 - Stroke survivors who like art have a significantly higher quality of life than those who do not, according to new research. Patients who appreciated music, painting and theatre recovered better from their stroke than patients who did not.

The research was presented at the 12th Annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing, March 16-17, in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Stroke is the third cause of death in the western world and the first cause of disability in adults. More and more older people are having strokes and undergoing recovery.

“We know that every six seconds there is a person affected by stroke in the world,” says lead author Dr. Ercole Vellone, assistant professor in nursing science at the School of Nursing, University Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. “Identifying strategies to improve stroke recovery and patients’ quality of life represent a priority for the healthcare system and art exposure seems to be promising.”

For the research, 192 stroke survivors (average age of 70 years) were asked if they liked or did not like art (music, painting, theatre). Quality of life was compared for patients interested in art (105) and patients not interested in art (87).

Patients interested in art had better general health, found it easier to walk and had more energy. They were also happier, less anxious or depressed and felt calmer. They had better memory and were superior communicators (speaking with other people, understanding what people said, naming people and objects correctly).

“Stroke survivors who saw art as an integrated part of their former lifestyle, by expressing appreciation towards music, painting and theatre, showed better recovery skills than those who did not," said Dr. Vellone.

“In our study the ‘art’ group of patients showed a comparable clinical picture to the ‘no art’ group,” he added. “This is important because it means that patients belonging to the ‘art’ group had a better quality of life independently from the gravity of stroke. The results suggest that art may make long term changes to the brain which help it recover when things go wrong.”

Other researchers have shown that listening to our favourite music directly stimulates a feeling a pleasure by releasing dopamine in the brain. Dopamine is the starting point of the so-called gratification circuit that activates oxytocin (the hormone of love) and finally endorphins (the molecules of pleasurable emotions). “Dopamine improves quality of life each time it is released in the brain,” said Dr. Vellone. “Further research is needed to see if other art forms stimulate dopamine release.”

For more information: www.escardio.org

Related Content

A key slide from Elnabawi's presentation, showing cardiac CT plaque evaluations, showing the impact of psoriasis medication on coronary plaques at baseline and one year of treatment. It shows a reversal of vulnerable plaque development. #SCAI, #SCAI2018

A key slide from Elnabawi's presentation, showing cardiac CT plaque evaluations, showing the impact of psoriasis medication on coronary plaques at baseline and one year of treatment. It shows a reversal of vulnerable plaque development.  

Feature | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | May 14, 2018
May 14, 2018 – New clinical evidance shows common therapy options for psoriasis (PSO), a chronic inflammatory skin di
Intravenous Drug Use is Causing Rise in Heart Valve Infections, Healthcare Costs. #SCAI, #SCAI2018
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | May 14, 2018
May 14, 2018 — The opioid drug epidemic is impacting cardiology, with a new study finding the number of patients hosp
Patient Enrollment Completed in U.S. IDE Study of THERMOCOOL SMARTTOUCH SF Catheter
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | March 15, 2018
March 15, 2018 –  Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies announced today that Biosense Webster, Inc., who wo
Lexington Begins HeartSentry Clinical Trial
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | February 20, 2018
February 20, 2018 – Lexington Biosciences, Inc., a development-stage medical device company, announced the commenceme
Endologix Completes Patient Enrollment in the ELEVATE IDE Clinical Study
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | February 06, 2018
February 6, 2018 – Endologix, a developer and marketer of treatments for aortic disorders, announced the completion o
12-Month Results from Veryan Medical's MIMICS-2 IDE Study Presented at LINC
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | February 01, 2018
February 1, 2018 – Thomas Zeller (Bad Krozingen, Germany) presented the 12-month results from Veryan Medical’s MIMICS
LimFlow Completes U.S. Feasibility Study Enrollment, Receives FDA Device Status
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | February 01, 2018
February 1, 2018 –  LimFlow SA, developer of minimally-inv
ESC 2017 late breaking trial hot line study presentations.
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | September 12, 2017
September 12, 2017 – The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2017 includes several Hot Line Late-breaking C
U.K., NHS studies, weekend effect, hospital admission, atrial fibrillation, heart failure
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | June 28, 2016
New research shows patients admitted to National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in the United Kingdom for atrial...
stroke risk
News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | August 28, 2015
Most people assume strokes only happen to octogenarians, but recent evidence suggests that survivors of childhood can
Overlay Init