News | Congenital Heart | February 28, 2019

Better Options Needed for Children at Higher Risk of Premature Heart Disease

New developments in identifying and treating the increased risk of premature heart disease in children and teens with certain medical conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk are discussed in a scientific statement from the American Heart Association

Better Options Needed for Children at Higher Risk of Premature Heart Disease

February 28, 2019 — Obesity and severe obesity in childhood and adolescence have been added to the list of conditions that put children and teens at increased risk for premature heart disease. The changed was noted in a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in the association’s journal Circulation.1

The statement provides an overview of current scientific knowledge about managing and treating the increased risk of atherosclerosis and early heart disease, in children and teens with:

  • Type 1 or 2 diabetes;

  • Familial high cholesterol;

  • Congenital heart disease;

  • Childhood cancer survivorship and other conditions.

Atherosclerosis is the slow narrowing of the arteries that underlies most heart diseases and stroke.

“Parents need to know that some medical conditions raise the chances of premature heart disease, but we are learning more every day about lifestyle changes and medical therapies that can lower their cardiovascular risk and help these children live their healthiest lives,” said Sarah de Ferranti, M.D., MPH, chair of the writing group for the statement and chief of the Division of Cardiology Outpatient Services at the Boston Children’s Hospital in Massachusetts.

For example, there are treatments for familial high cholesterol – a group of genetic disorders that affect how people process cholesterol which can lead to extremely high cholesterol levels – that can help children and teens with this disorder live a normal lifespan.

The statement is an update of a 2006 scientific statement and adds obesity and severe obesity to the list of conditions that put children and teens at increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, and reviews new treatments for previously discussed conditions.

Severe obesity and obesity are now considered moderate risk and at-risk conditions, respectively, because research shows they significantly increase chances of developing heart disease later in life. A study of almost 2.3 million individuals followed for over 40 years found the risks of dying from a cardiovascular disease were two to three times higher if their body weight as adolescents had been in the overweight or obese category compared to youth with normal weight. Effective treatments for obesity have proven elusive, but in general, a gradual approach to weight loss is generally required, incorporating improvements in dietary quality, fewer calories, more physical activity, meal replacements, medical therapy and/or bariatric surgery depending on the severity of the excess adiposity.

Other significant changes to the statement since 2006 include:

  • The elevation of Type 2 diabetes to a high-risk condition because of its association with additional cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure and obesity; and

  • The expansion of the risks of premature heart disease associated with treatments for childhood cancers.

For more information: www.ahajournals.org/journal/circ

Reference

1. De Ferranti S.D., Steinberger J., Ameduri R., et al. Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in High-Risk Pediatric Patients: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association. Circulation, Feb. 25, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000618


Related Content

News | Cardiac Diagnostics

September 15, 2022 - Happitech has announced the launch of its FastStart Research app. The Amsterdam-based digital ...

Home September 15, 2022
Home
Feature | Cardiac Diagnostics | by Kelly Patrick

Like most healthcare markets, the diagnostic cardiology market has had a bumpy ride in recent years. The COVID-19 ...

Home August 23, 2022
Home
Feature | Cardiac Diagnostics | By Adam Saltman, MD, PhD

Before opining on the future of cardiac health, I think it’s important to define what “cardiac health” actually is. If ...

Home May 04, 2022
Home
News | Cardiac Diagnostics

January 31, 2022 — Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that can analyze eye scans taken ...

Home January 31, 2022
Home
News | Cardiac Diagnostics

November 10, 2021 — Abbott released new global market research from its Beyond Intervention initiative, the company’s ...

Home November 10, 2021
Home
Feature | Cardiac Diagnostics | By Dave Fornell, DAIC Editor

October 29, 2021 — A new guideline for the evaluation and diagnosis of chest pain was released this week that provides ...

Home October 29, 2021
Home
News | Cardiac Diagnostics

October 4, 2021 – Nanowear, a hospital-at-home and remote diagnostic platform that used proprietary wearable cloth ...

Home October 04, 2021
Home
News | Cardiac Diagnostics

September 28, 2021 — Biotricity Inc., a medical diagnostic and consumer healthcare technology company, has developed a ...

Home September 28, 2021
Home
News | Cardiac Diagnostics

July 29, 2021 — A recent clinical study from Overlake Medical Center utilizing the Bardy Diagnostics Carnation ...

Home July 29, 2021
Home
News | Cardiac Diagnostics

July 1, 2021 — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared the Angel Medical Systems Inc. second-generation ...

Home July 01, 2021
Home
Subscribe Now