News | October 25, 2013

Cardiovascular Research Foundation Appoints Jack Lewin as CEO

Healthcare executive takes helm at interventional cardiology foundation

October 25, 2013 — The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) announced the appointment of John (Jack) Lewin, M.D., as the foundation’s president and CEO. Lewin was also appointed to CRF’s board of directors. CRF believes Lewin brings a unique blend of leadership and management skills to the organization. He succeeds William Himmelsbach, who retired in late 2012. Colette Gardner, CRF board member, served as president and co-chair of the Executive Leadership Council in the interim.
 
“Since its inception in 1990, CRF has played a major role in the great progress that has been made in interventional cardiology, and in realizing dramatic improvements in the lives of countless patients by establishing the safe use of new technologies and therapies for heart disease,” said Lewin. “I look forward to working with CRF’s iconic physicians who are so passionate about advancing the field. The combination of preclinical research, clinical trials and excellence in education under one roof gives the foundation a distinctive ability to generate important research questions, test and refine groundbreaking new therapies, and ensure that these therapies are available to patients at the earliest possible opportunity.”
 
“Jack Lewin’s distinguished background and remarkably innovative tenure as CEO of the American College of Cardiology make him an exceptional individual for this position,” said Eric Woldenberg, chairman, CRF board of directors and senior partner, Pryor Cashman LLP.  “His proven leadership skills, along with his expertise in both the business and clinical aspects of health care, will enable him to help us strengthen and expand our role in the development of new technologies and therapies that will benefit people with heart disease worldwide.” 
 
Lewin served as CEO of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) from 2006 to April 2012. Prior to the ACC, Lewin was CEO of the California Medical Association for eight years. Previously, he was Hawaii’s director of health from 1986-1994, overseeing 6,500 employees, 12 hospitals and a $1 billion budget. Before that, as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, Lewin was the founder and first director of the Navajo Nation Department of Health, serving the needs of America’s largest Indian tribe. He currently serves as the voluntary chairman of the board for the National Coalition on Health Care. In 2011, he was named as one of Modern Healthcare’s 100 most influential people in Healthcare.
 
For more information: www.crf.org
 

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