News | Womens Cardiovascular Health | October 20, 2017

Cardiovascular Risk Significantly Higher in Women With Fatty Liver Disease

Population study finds men with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) do not experience same increased risk

Cardiovascular Risk Significantly Higher in Women With Fatty Liver Disease

October 20, 2017 — Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with significantly higher risk of subsequent cardiovascular events in women, but not in men, according to research presented at The Liver Meeting held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

NAFLD is a group of diseases characterized by an excessive accumulation of fat in the liver, and most often occurring in people who consume little to no alcohol. NAFLD is the most common form of chronic liver disease in children and adults, affecting 80 to 100 million people around the world.

NAFLD has been recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular incidents – such as heart pain, heart attack, heart failure, irregular and rapid heartbeat, and stroke. Cardiovascular disease is generally known to occur less in women, simply because of their female sex. This made researchers at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., interested in exploring if sex‐related differences in cardiovascular events persist in patients with NAFLD.

Alina M. Allen, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic’s Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and her team compared 3,869 people who were diagnosed with NAFLD between 1997 and 2014 to 15,209 people without the disease (all of which lived in the same community and were matched based on age, gender and pre‐existing cardiovascular diseases).

“We followed this cohort for up to 20 years and examined the number of new cardiovascular events that occurred in men and women after NAFLD diagnosis and their matched counterparts,” explained Allen. “We noted that in subjects with NAFLD, the risk for these events was higher in women than in men, but contrary to those without the liver disease. In NAFLD, the protective effect of the female sex on cardiovascular risk disappears. Additionally, we noted cardiovascular events started at an earlier age for these women than in the general population.”

These findings suggest that cardiovascular risk assessment in NAFLD should consider sex‐related differences, as women may require more aggressive preventative measures to avoid worse cardiovascular outcomes.

Future studies should assess preventative measures that could lower this risk.

Allen will present the clinical study during AASLD; the corresponding abstract can be found in the journal Hepatology.

For more information: www.aasldpubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com

Related Content

Weight Loss Drug Does Not Increase Cardiovascular Events
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | August 31, 2018
A weight loss drug does not increase cardiovascular events, according to late breaking results from the CAMELLIA-TIMI...
Acarix Presents CADScor System at ESC 2018
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | August 27, 2018
Acarix AB’s ultra-sensitive acoustic CADScor System for coronary artery disease risk assessment will be on display at...
NIH Ending Funding for Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health Trial
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | August 24, 2018
The National Institutes of Health announced in June it plans to end funding to the Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular...
Study Shows Multiple Benefits of Patient-to-Patient Connectivity in Familial Chylomicronemia Syndrome
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | August 07, 2018
Akcea Therapeutics Inc., an affiliate of Ionis Pharmaceuticals Inc., announced the publication of results from the...
Being Overweight May Change Young Adults' Heart Structure, Function
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | August 03, 2018
Even as a young adult, being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and thicken heart muscle, setting the stage for...
High Intensity Exercise in Teenagers Could Ward Off Heart Disease

Ultrasound image of the carotid artery. Lines in yellow were used to determine arterial diameter and stretching before and following exercise.

News | Cardiac Diagnostics | July 16, 2018
New research published in Experimental Physiology has indicated potential differences in heart health benefits of...
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | June 14, 2018
A team of researchers says it has linked sensitivity to an allergen in red meat to the buildup of plaque in the...
The blood of patients with familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS) can appear milky in color (lipemic) due to the buildup of fat in their body. Image courtesy of Akcea Therapeutics.

The blood of patients with familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS) can appear milky in color (lipemic) due to the buildup of fat in their body. Image courtesy of Akcea Therapeutics.

 

Feature | Cardiac Diagnostics | May 07, 2018 | Steven D. Freedman, M.D., Ph.D.
 
Overlay Init