News | Business | September 04, 2015

Career Satisfaction Remains High Among Physicians

2015 survey finds majority of physicians happy in their profession, while frustrations over work hours, healthcare costs remain

Great American Physician Survey, 2015, career satisfaction, happy, healthcare changes

September 4, 2015 — Despite numerous major changes looming in the healthcare industry, the 2015 edition of the Great American Physician Survey found that U.S. physicians are still happy in their careers.

Sponsored by Kareo and conducted by Physicians Practice, this year's survey quieried 1,001 physicians nationwide, who shared thoughts on their medical careers, their personal lives and the politics affecting the healthcare industry. When asked to characterize their happiness on a scale of 1 to 10, the average rating was a 7.3. It was the same average when physicians were polled on how healthy they were. When asked to what extent they agree with the statement, "I like being a physician," 84 percent of physicians selected either a 4 or 5 on a scale of 1 to 5 as their reply.

There were, of course, frustrations with their career and the practice of medicine. They included:

  • 53 percent of physicians saying they wish they could work fewer hours;
  • 38 percent noting higher deductibles and higher patient cost sharing as the largest barrier to good healthcare for their patients;
  • 69 percent of physicians indicating they do not have as much time for their personal life as they wish; and
  • 51 percent disagreeing with the statement, "I have a good work-life balance."

There's also the lingering uncertainty on how quality metrics and regulatory measures will affect physician compensation in the near future. But overall, physicians are finding ways to stay content while practicing medicine, as outlined in the cover story of the September 2015 issue of Physicians Practice. Along with the cover story and the survey results, Physicians Practice has released a video highlighting how physicians from practices of varying sizes responded to the survey.

From turning to technology to finding a new place to practice — or new practice model altogether — physicians are retaining their love for medicine and providing excellent patient care.

"Make no mistake about it, the difficulties physicians are facing — regulatory demands from the federal government, other third-party interference, and long hours — are still very much there. Yet, despite this reality, physicians are still finding joy in the practice of medicine and maintaining a high overall level of happiness and healthiness," said Gabriel Perna, managing editor of Physicians Practice.

For more information: www.ubmmedica.com

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