News | March 17, 2009

eCardio Diagnostics Launches Academic Medicine Service

March 17, 2009 - eCardio Diagnostics has launched an Academic Medicine initiative to provide a tailored offering to university-based health systems, marking the first time an arrhythmia monitoring company has addressed the unique workflow, teaching and research responsibilities of academic medical centers.

The eCardio Academic Medicine service offers:
• Unique Web platform to address academic flow for patient management
• 24-hour monitoring by eCardio's eLab, an independent diagnostic testing facility
• Complimentary arrhythmia monitors, including extended monitors, cardiac event monitors and Holter monitors.

John Elsholz has been appointed vice president of Academic Medicine to lead the initiative. Elsholz has worked in the area of cardiac rhythm management for more than 25 years in both academic and industrial settings.

For more information: www.ecardio.com

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