News | Cardiac Diagnostics | December 19, 2017

ERT Acquires iCardiac Technologies

Combined organization delivers innovative, efficient safety and efficacy solutions that support all phases of clinical development

ERT Acquires iCardiac Technologies

December 19, 2017 — ERT recently announced it has acquired iCardiac Technologies, a provider of centralized cardiac safety and respiratory solutions that accelerate clinical research. Financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

The acquisition enables ERT to expand its portfolio of cardiac safety solutions, specifically through the addition of iCardiac’s sophisticated, algorithm-driven technology, which supports efficient, cost-effective and regulatory-compliant methods of conducting QT assessments in early-phase clinical trials.

Alex Zapesochny, president and CEO of iCardiac, will join ERT’s executive team to lead the company’s Cardiac Safety business, which includes ERT’s existing Cardiac Safety services as well as those offerings recently acquired via Biomedical Systems.

Some of the innovations iCardiac has introduced recently include the High Precision QT and Early Precision QT methodologies.

For more information: www.ert.com, www.icardiac.com

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