News | Wearable Sensors | June 19, 2015

ERT Integrates Remote Biosensor Patch with Electronic Clinical Outcome Assessment System

Wireless device captures and records continuous clinical-grade measurements

ERT, wearable biosensor, eCOA, DIA, electronic Clinical Outcome Assessment

June 19, 2015 - ERT announced the integration of a wearable biosensor which captures and wirelessly transmits real-time, continuous, clinical-grade biometric measurements into the ERT electronic Clinical Outcome Assessment (eCOA) system. ERT showcased a proof-of-concept demonstration of the integration at its Innovation Lab at the Drug Information Association (DIA) Annual Meeting, June 14-17, in Washington, D.C.

The ERT Innovation Lab capitalizes on the acceleration and diversification of technological advances for use in new medical product development and broad clinical care. DIA Annual Meeting attendees could visit the Innovation Lab to see demonstrations of progressive product advancements – including the biosensor patch/eCOA system integration – which are being developed to help pharmaceutical companies and CROs meet clinical trial objectives more efficiently and reliably.

The biosensor is a disposable, wireless patch worn on the chest. Its thin, light form factor is comfortable and discreet while providing healthcare professionals access to unprecedented amounts of continuous vital-sign data on their patients. The patch contains cutting-edge sensors and electronics, along with advanced algorithm technologies, to provide continuous, clinical-grade measurements of electrocardiogram (ECG), respiratory rate, heart rate, heart rate variability, skin temperature, physical activity, posture and fall detection.

As a proof of concept, ERT is capturing patient fall detection data from the patch biosensor and using it to trigger an episodic electronic diary assessment to capture information about the circumstance of the fall. Sponsors can use one or more of the vital statistics as needed to support efficacy and/or safety endpoints that meet their clinical development objectives.

For more information: www.ert.com

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