News | Vena Cava Filters | December 04, 2018

First BTG Sentry Bioconvertible IVC Filter Implanted in U.S.

Filter bioconverts after period of transient risk of pulmonary embolism, leaving patent, unobstructed IVC lumen

First BTG Sentry Bioconvertible IVC Filter Implanted in U.S.

December 4, 2018 — BTG plc announced the first patients outside of a clinical trial have been successfully implanted with the BTG Sentry device, a bioconvertible inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. The BTG Sentry filter is designed to provide protection from pulmonary embolism (PE) for the period of transient risk and then bioconvert to leave a patent, unobstructed IVC lumen. This eliminates the need to retrieve and addresses the typical filter-related complications associated with conventional IVC filters.

Ayad K.M. Agha, M.D., director of interventional radiology and an interventional radiologist at Cardiovascular Interventional Radiology Centers in Phoenix, who performed the procedure on one of his patients, said: “Traditional IVC filters are sometimes associated with a variety of concerns. Placing the BTG Sentry filter gives me confidence in reducing potential complications seen with conventional filters. Using the BTG Sentry IVC filter only requires one visit which means my patient doesn’t have to worry about coming back to make sure the filter is retrieved. This is better for the patient and their families and removes the risk of any complications that may arise on a follow-up procedure”

The BTG Sentry filter is supported by two years of data available through the SENTRY Trial. The data was recently presented on podium at VIVA in Las Vegas, and demonstrated no instances of filter tilt, migration, embolization, fracture or IVC perforation through 24-months of imaging-intensive follow-up.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration 510(k) clearance for the Sentry device was obtained in 2017.

For more information: www.btgplc.com

Related Content

Shockwave Announces Collaboration With Abiomed on Physician Training
News | Cath Lab | December 14, 2018
Shockwave Medical announced a new investment and collaboration agreement with Abiomed Inc. As outlined by the agreement...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Cath Lab | October 24, 2018
Michael Flaherty, M.D., discusses a study published in Circulation Research which finds that use of hemodynamic suppo
Philips Showcases Integrated Solutions for Cardiovascular Care at TCT 2018
News | Cath Lab | September 20, 2018
At the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) annual meeting, Sept. 21–25 in San Diego, Philips is showcasing...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Cath Lab | September 19, 2018
William O’Neill, M.D., outlines his recent clinical publication of AMICS patients from the Impella Quality (IQ) datab
A complex PCI case to revascularize a chronic total occlusion (CTO) at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. Complex PCI and CHIP cases are increasing patient volumes in the cath lab and using a minimally invasive approach in patients who otherwise would have been sent for CABG. Pictured is Khaldoon Alaswad, M.D. DAIC staff photo by Dave Fornell

A complex PCI case to revascularize a chronic total occlusion (CTO) at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. Complex PCI and CHIP cases are increasing patient volumes in the cath lab and using a minimally invasive approach in patients who otherwise would have been sent for CABG. Pictured is Khaldoon Alaswad, M.D. (right) who is proctoring a fellow in treating CTOs.

Feature | Cath Lab | September 13, 2018 | Artur Kim, Kamran Zamanian
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a multifaceted disease that demands various approaches in terms of diagnosis and tre
Videos | Cath Lab | August 13, 2018
Jeffrey Schussler, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, FSCCT, FACP, interventional cardiologist at Baylor Scott White Heart and Vascul
Shockwave Launches Coronary Intravascular Lithotripsy in Europe
News | Cath Lab | May 30, 2018
Shockwave Medical recently announced the European commercial availability of Intravascular Lithotripsy (IVL) for...
Overlay Init