News | Heart Failure | June 23, 2017

First Canadian Patient Implanted With CardioMEMS Heart Failure Sensor

After simple procedure, heart monitor proven to alter treatment of cardiac condition

First Canadian Patient Implanted With CardioMEMS Heart Failure Sensor

June 23, 2017 — In a Canadian first, a medical team has implanted the wireless CardioMEMS HF device inside a heart failure patient. The device permits clinicians to monitor the patient’s cardiovascular status — virtually and in real time ‑ and proactively adjust treatment to prevent costly, potentially unnecessary hospitalization.

“Heart failure is an epidemic that commonly leads to hospitalization,” said Heather Ross, M.D., scientific lead at the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research and cardiologist, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network. “Hospitalization is often necessary when patients start to retain fluid, develop congestion and experience shortness of breath. This technology is a way to directly measure how much fluid is in a patient, allowing us to intervene before they develop symptoms of congestion, before they end up in hospital. This is a big game-changer.”

Funded by the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, the CardioMEMS HF System was successfully implanted by interventional cardiologists at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre in March 2017. The system features a small butterfly-like sensor that then sits inside the pulmonary artery of a heart failure patient. When the patient lies on an accompanying antenna-equipped pillow device, the sensor provides important data — including the patient’s lung pressure readings to clinicians — via a secure website.

“Never before have we had the ability to obtain a patient’s accurate lung pressure data while they are outside the hospital,” said Meredith Linghorne, nurse practitioner, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre. “Traditionally we’ve relied on a patient describing symptoms, and by then they may have already progressed to the point of hospitalization. With this device, we can see warning signs days in advance, and adjust treatment accordingly.”

The most rapidly rising cardiovascular disease in Canada, heart failure affects close to one million Canadians, and an estimated 26 million people globally. In Canada, heart failure patients stay an average of almost 10 days for each hospital admission, accounting for 1.4 million hospital stays a year. These patients live an average of 2.1 years after diagnosis and cost the Canadian health-care system more than $3 billion annually. About one-quarter of these patients return to hospital within three months, while approximately 50 per cent return to hospital within six months.

The CardioMEMS HF System is designed to remotely monitor heart failure patients whose condition is serious but who are not so ill that the technology cannot improve their outcome. The first Canadian patient implanted with the heart monitor will be among 25 patients within the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre to be fitted with the device over the next nine months.

Produced by Abbott, the CardioMEMS HF System is approved in the United States by the U.s. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and is currently awaiting approval by Health Canada.

For more information: www.sjm.com

Related Content

Registry Identifies Early Onset of Heart Failure and Lack of Defibrillators in Asia
News | Heart Failure| August 03, 2017
August 3, 2017 — The Asian Pacific Society of Cardiology (ASPC) held its first-ever late-breaking...
Left Atrial Pressure Monitor from Vectorious Medical Technologies Offers New Hope for Heart Failure Patients

On of the top stories in July was the introduction of a left atrial pressure monitor from Vectorious Medical Technologies to prevent heart failure patient hospitalizations or readmissions. Read the article"Left Atrial Pressure Monitor Offers New Hope for Heart Failure Patients."

Feature | August 01, 2017 | Dave Fornell
Aug.
Wearable monitors create patient generated health data, PGHD, that can help prevent acute care episodes in heart failure.

Wearable monitoring devices may offer a new tool to help prevent acute care episodes in heart failure.

Feature | Heart Failure| July 25, 2017 | Lola Koktysh
Despite their best efforts, many patients tend to develop heart failure after an acute event (e.g., a heart attack or
Biotronik Launches DX Technology for U.S. Heart Failure Patients
News | Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices (CRT)| July 21, 2017
Biotronik announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and availability of the Intica DX and Intica...
Hospital Readmissions Analysis Across All Ages, Insurance Types Identifies High-Risk Groups
News | Business| July 20, 2017
July 20, 2017 — Clinician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) recently published a first-of-i
Left Atrial Pressure Monitor Offers New Hope for Heart Failure Patients
News | Heart Failure| July 14, 2017
A review appearing in the July 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) discusses current...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Heart Failure| July 13, 2017
William Abraham, M.D., director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at The Ohio State University Wexner Medica
monitoring a heart failure patient's chest fluid buildup with remote monitoring using the SensiVest

A heart failure patient wearing the SensiVest remote monitoring system for a two-minute a day assessment. 

News | Heart Failure| July 13, 2017
July 13, 2017 — About 5.7 million adults in the U.S.
Overlay Init