News | Heart Failure | June 23, 2017

First Canadian Patient Implanted With CardioMEMS Heart Failure Sensor

After simple procedure, heart monitor proven to alter treatment of cardiac condition

First Canadian Patient Implanted With CardioMEMS Heart Failure Sensor

June 23, 2017 — In a Canadian first, a medical team has implanted the wireless CardioMEMS HF device inside a heart failure patient. The device permits clinicians to monitor the patient’s cardiovascular status — virtually and in real time ‑ and proactively adjust treatment to prevent costly, potentially unnecessary hospitalization.

“Heart failure is an epidemic that commonly leads to hospitalization,” said Heather Ross, M.D., scientific lead at the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research and cardiologist, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network. “Hospitalization is often necessary when patients start to retain fluid, develop congestion and experience shortness of breath. This technology is a way to directly measure how much fluid is in a patient, allowing us to intervene before they develop symptoms of congestion, before they end up in hospital. This is a big game-changer.”

Funded by the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, the CardioMEMS HF System was successfully implanted by interventional cardiologists at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre in March 2017. The system features a small butterfly-like sensor that then sits inside the pulmonary artery of a heart failure patient. When the patient lies on an accompanying antenna-equipped pillow device, the sensor provides important data — including the patient’s lung pressure readings to clinicians — via a secure website.

“Never before have we had the ability to obtain a patient’s accurate lung pressure data while they are outside the hospital,” said Meredith Linghorne, nurse practitioner, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre. “Traditionally we’ve relied on a patient describing symptoms, and by then they may have already progressed to the point of hospitalization. With this device, we can see warning signs days in advance, and adjust treatment accordingly.”

The most rapidly rising cardiovascular disease in Canada, heart failure affects close to one million Canadians, and an estimated 26 million people globally. In Canada, heart failure patients stay an average of almost 10 days for each hospital admission, accounting for 1.4 million hospital stays a year. These patients live an average of 2.1 years after diagnosis and cost the Canadian health-care system more than $3 billion annually. About one-quarter of these patients return to hospital within three months, while approximately 50 per cent return to hospital within six months.

The CardioMEMS HF System is designed to remotely monitor heart failure patients whose condition is serious but who are not so ill that the technology cannot improve their outcome. The first Canadian patient implanted with the heart monitor will be among 25 patients within the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre to be fitted with the device over the next nine months.

Produced by Abbott, the CardioMEMS HF System is approved in the United States by the U.s. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and is currently awaiting approval by Health Canada.

For more information: www.sjm.com

Related Content

EMPRISE Study Shows Empagliflozin Reduces Heart Failure Hospitalization with new data presented at AHA 2018. #AHA18 #AHA2018
News | Heart Failure | November 07, 2018
November 6, 2018 – Initial results from the real-world EMPagliflozin compaRative effectIveness and SafEty (EMPRISE) s
Acute Heart Failure Mortality, Rehospitalizations Reduced With Blood Volume Measurement
News | Heart Failure | November 02, 2018
In a new study, acute heart failure patients who received individualized treatment by blood volume measurement with the...
Daxor Corp. Collaborating With CHF Solutions on Heart Failure Fluid Overload Management

CHF Solutions' Aquadex FlexFlow System

News | Heart Failure | November 01, 2018
November 1, 2018 — Daxor Corp.
NHLBI Pauses CONCERT-HF Heart Failure Trial
News | Heart Failure | October 29, 2018
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, is pausing the...
A patient who received the HeartMate III LVAD system showing off his external battery pack. He served as a patient ambassador in the Abbott booth at ACC 2018. The HeartMate III, with its magnetic levitated pump, showed a big reduction in clotting over previous LVADs in a key late-breaking trial at ACC earlier this year.

A patient who received the HeartMate III LVAD system showing off his external battery pack. He served as a patient ambassador in the Abbott booth at ACC 2018. The HeartMate III, with its magnetic levitated pump, showed a big reduction in clotting over previous LVADs in a key late-breaking trial at ACC earlier this year.

Feature | Heart Failure | October 19, 2018
October 19, 2018 — Abbott announced today that the HeartMate 3 Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) has received U.S
Ohio State First in U.S. to Test Shunt Device for Heart Failure
News | Heart Failure | October 04, 2018
The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is first in the country to test a new medical device designed to help...
Mitral Regurgitation Volume Reduced at One Year in REDUCE FMR Trial
News | Heart Failure | September 28, 2018
Heart failure patients who received the Carillon Mitral Contour System in the REDUCE FMR clinical trial showed a...
Overlay Init