News | Cardiac Diagnostics | April 14, 2017

Grey Hair Linked With Increased Heart Disease Risk in Men

Observational study finds high hair whitening score associated with increased CAD risk independent of chronological age and established cardiovascular risk factors

Grey Hair Linked With Increased Heart Disease Risk in Men

April 14, 2017 — Grey hair has been linked with an increased risk of heart disease in men, in research presented recently at EuroPrevent 2017, April 6-8 in Malaga, Spain. EuroPrevent is an annual congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

“Ageing is an unavoidable coronary risk factor and is associated with dermatological signs that could signal increased risk,” said Dr. Irini Samuel, a cardiologist at Cairo University, Egypt. “More research is needed on cutaneous signs of risk that would enable us to intervene earlier in the cardiovascular disease process.”

Atherosclerosis and hair greying share similar mechanisms such as impaired DNA repair, oxidative stress, inflammation, hormonal changes and senescence of functional cells. This study assessed the prevalence of grey hair in patients with coronary artery disease and whether it was an independent risk marker of disease.

This was a prospective, observational study which included 545 adult men who underwent multi-slice computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography for suspected coronary artery disease. Patients were divided into subgroups according to the presence or absence of coronary artery disease, and the amount of grey/white hair.

The amount of grey hair was graded using the hair whitening score: 1 = pure black hair, 2 = black more than white, 3 = black equals white, 4 = white more than black, and 5 = pure white. Each patient’s grade was determined by two independent observers.

Data was collected on traditional cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, dyslipidaemia and family history of coronary artery disease.

The researchers found that a high hair whitening score (grade 3 or more) was associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease independent of chronological age and established cardiovascular risk factors. Patients with coronary artery disease had a statistically significant higher hair whitening score and higher coronary artery calcification than those without coronary artery disease.

In multivariate regression analysis, age, hair whitening score, hypertension and dyslipidaemia were independent predictors of the presence of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Only age was an independent predictor of hair whitening.

“Atherosclerosis and hair greying occur through similar biological pathways and the incidence of both increases with age,” said Samuel. “Our findings suggest that, irrespective of chronological age, hair greying indicates biological age and could be a warning sign of increased cardiovascular risk.”

Samuel said asymptomatic patients at high risk of coronary artery disease should have regular check-ups to avoid early cardiac events by initiating preventive therapy.

“Further research is needed, in coordination with dermatologists, to learn more about the causative genetic and possible avoidable environmental factors that determine hair whitening,” she added. “A larger study including men and women is required to confirm the association between hair greying and cardiovascular disease in patients without other known cardiovascular risk factors.”

She concluded: “If our findings are confirmed, standardization of the scoring system for evaluation of hair greying could be used as a predictor for coronary artery disease.”

For more information: www.escardio.org

Related Content

New Blood Test Predicts Major Cardiac Events Better Than Clinical Evaluation of Other Common Risk Factors
News | Blood Testing| April 28, 2017
Prevencio Inc. announced the publication of data demonstrating that a simple new blood test is more accurate than...
New Twelve-Month Data Show Efficacy of Pulsar-18 Bare Metal Stent
News | Stents Peripheral| April 28, 2017
Biotronik’s Pulsar-18 bare metal stent (BMS) has yielded high primary patency in a real-world setting, according to the...
Mercator MedSystems Announces First Enrollment in TANGO Trial for Below-the-Knee Vascular Disease
News | Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD)| April 27, 2017
Mercator MedSystems Inc. announced the first patient enrollment into the TANGO (Temsirolimus Adventitial Delivery to...
News | Venous Therapies| April 26, 2017
A new Varicose Vein Registry has begun producing useful outcomes information, as reported in the May edition of the...
Twelve-Month Data Positive for Ranger Paclitaxel-Coated Balloon Catheter
News | Drug-Eluting Balloons| April 26, 2017
Boston Scientific announced results from the RANGER SFA trial for the Ranger Paclitaxel-Coated PTA Balloon Catheter at...
AATS Consensus Statement Helps Manage Treatment of Coronary Anomalies
News | Cardiac Diagnostics| April 26, 2017
The issues surrounding congenital coronary anomalies and their effect on sudden death are complex. Researchers are...
Body Weight Fluctuations Linked to More Deaths in People with Coronary Artery Disease
News | Cardiac Diagnostics| April 25, 2017
Repeated cycles of weight loss and gain may be linked to higher risk for stroke, heart attack and death in people with...
Clinical Study Validates Efficiencies of Stereotaxis Niobe ES System Over Niobe II System
News | Robotic Systems| April 24, 2017
A recent study conducted at Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) of Saint-Étienne, France validated the advantages of...
USC Study Finds Potassium-Rich Diet Can Lower Blood Pressure
News | Hypertension| April 19, 2017
Eating potassium-rich foods like sweet potatoes, avocados, spinach, beans, bananas and even coffee could be key to...
3-D-printed Model of Stenotic Intracranial Artery Enables Vessel-Wall MRI Standardization
News | 3-D Printing| April 18, 2017
A collaboration between stroke neurologists at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and bioengineers at the...
Overlay Init