News | EP Lab | August 27, 2019

Lenox Hill Hospital Opens New Heart Rhythm Center

New York facility includes new procedural lab with state-of-the-art electrophysiology procedures and technologies

Lenox Hill Hospital Opens New Heart Rhythm Center

August 27, 2019 – Lenox Hill Hospital (New York, N.Y.) has established a brand new Heart Rhythm Center dedicated to the treatment of heartbeat abnormalities. The facility, which includes a brand new procedural laboratory, will offer patients a state-of-the-art program delivering cutting-edge electrophysiology procedures, including complex ablations, minimally-invasive pacemaker and defibrillator implantations, and structural interventions. The space also includes a newly renovated reception area and a comfortable, tranquil waiting room for patients’ families and friends.

The revitalization of the reception area was made possible thanks to a gift by longtime Northwell Health donor Susan Merinoff. The “Susan and Herman Merinoff Reception” space bears her name as well as that of her late husband. Merinoff and her family have been loyal supporters of the health system for several decades, previously helping endow such services as the Palliative Medicine Program at Lenox Hill and the Center for Patient-Oriented Research at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research.

“We are extremely grateful for Mrs. Merinoff’s generosity in helping us reinvigorate and expand our electrophysiology services,” said Nicholas Skipitaris, M.D., director of electrophysiology at Lenox Hill. “We will continue to provide innovative care to our patients, and now we can also offer a beautiful, dedicated space for their families to gather while they support their loved ones.”

Cardiac arrhythmia is a fairly common medical condition in which the heart’s internal electrical system malfunctions causing problems in the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. According to the American Heart Association, more than 4 million Americans suffer from recurrent arrhythmias. While most arrhythmias are harmless, some may be serious enough to cause organ damage, heart attack, stroke or even death if left untreated.

Lenox Hill Heart & Lung, the cardiac and pulmonary service line of the hospital, is equipped with the latest technology to manage and treat the various types of arrhythmias, providing a range of minimally-invasive treatments. In addition, Lenox Hill was one of the first medical centers in the nation to offer Medtronic’s CardioInsight sensor vest mapping-system to quickly, accurately and non-invasively identify the exact site of an electrical malfunction within the heart.

“The Heart Rhythm Center continues the growth of Lenox Hill Hospital’s cardiology services with a patient and family centered facility dedicated to the treatment heartbeat abnormalities,” said Varinder Singh, M.D., chair of cardiovascular medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital and chair of cardiovascular services for the northwest region of Northwell Health. “As one of the nation’s leaders in cardiac care, our team of nationally recognized electrophysiology specialists uses the latest techniques and devices to help monitor, control and maintain a healthy heartbeat.”

For more information: www.northwell.edu

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