News | EP Lab | May 30, 2024

Penn Presbyterian Medical Center Becomes First Hospital in the Northeast to Adopt Advanced Robotic Technology for Heart Treatment

Stereotaxis, a pioneer in surgical robotics for minimally invasive endovascular intervention, announced the successful treatment of the first heart rhythm patients by Penn Presbyterian Medical Center (PPMC) utilizing the advanced Genesis Robotic Magnetic Navigation System.

May 30, 2024 — Stereotaxis, a pioneer in surgical robotics for minimally invasive endovascular intervention, announced the successful treatment of the first heart rhythm patients by Penn Presbyterian Medical Center (PPMC) utilizing the advanced Genesis Robotic Magnetic Navigation System.

PPMC, part of the University of Pennsylvania Health System, renowned for advanced clinical research, innovation, and compassionate patient care, stands at the forefront as the first in the Northeast United States to offer the Genesis System. Genesis is the latest advancement in Robotic Magnetic Navigation technology. Robotic Magnetic Navigation introduces the benefits of robotic precision and safety to cardiac ablation, a common minimally invasive procedure to treat arrhythmias. Tens of millions of individuals worldwide suffer from arrhythmias – abnormal heart rhythms that result when the heart beats too quickly, too slowly, or with an irregular pattern. When left untreated, arrhythmias may significantly increase the risk of stroke, heart failure, and sudden cardiac arrest.

“Our adoption of advanced robotic technology significant enhances our ability to precisely diagnose and treat patients suffering from complex cardiac arrhythmias,” said Dr. Benjamin D’Souza, Cardiac Electrophysiologist at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. “We are committed to leveraging cutting-edge innovations to provide patients with the best care. Our team has leveraged the precision and safety of robotics to treat patients that often have few other options for care. With unmatched accuracy, we can tailor treatments to each patient's unique anatomy, enhancing safety and efficacy.”

“We are excited to partner with Penn Presbyterian to pioneer the Genesis Robotic System in the Northeast,” said David Fischel, Chairman and CEO of Stereotaxis. “We look forward to supporting Penn Presbyterian in growing a highly successful and impactful robotic heart care program that advances patient care, clinical research and technology advancement.”

For more information: www.stereotaxis.com


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