News | Cardiac Diagnostics | February 09, 2016

New Study Explores Impact of Worksite-based Lifestyle Intervention on Cardiovascular Risk

Study by Mount Sinai Heart Institute to investigate how worksite-based lifestyle intervention and imaging techniques can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease

Mount Sinai Heart, TANSNIP-PESA study, worksite lifestyle intervention, cardiovascular risk

February 9, 2016 — Mount Sinai Heart is undertaking a three-year study to determine whether a workplace-based lifestyle intervention, accompanied by imaging data, will reduce the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors related to lifestyle.

The study, known as TANSNIP-PESA, will be led by Valentin Fuster, M.D., Ph.D., director of Mount Sinai Heart and physician-in-chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital.

“Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and early prevention is important for health gains and for cost reduction. I fully expect that individual awareness of cardiovascular disease based on imaging, accompanied by a comprehensive three-year work-based lifestyle intervention, will lead to a reduction in the prevalence of CV risk factors related to lifestyle,” said Fuster.

The population for the TANSNIP-PESA consists of people 40 to 60 years old and who are employees from a Spanish corporation. Employees will be divided into two groups. One group will comprise employees with high imaging-defined CV risk and a second group will comprise those with low imaging-defined CV risk. In both groups, participants will be randomized to either receive the comprehensive three-year worksite lifestyle intervention or standard occupational healthcare.

Employees in the workplace-based lifestyle intervention program will receive 12 personalized lifestyle counseling sessions spread over the three-year period, a Fitbit personal fitness monitor to self-monitor physical activity and an Ergotron sit-to-stand station. Data will be collected at baseline, at year one, at year two and at year three.

The primary outcome measure is the newly developed FUSTER-BEWAT score, which consists of blood pressure, physical activity, sedentary behavior, body mass index, fruit and vegetable consumption, and smoking. The researchers will also measure secondary outcomes such as changes in lifestyle, smoking, body weight, diet, vitality and quality of life, and risk factor profiles, as well as changes in blood biomarkers, and work-related outcomes such as work productivity and absenteeism.

The researchers hypothesize that the level of compliance with the lifestyle intervention will be higher in the group with high imaging-defined CV risk, compared to those with low imaging-defined CV risk. They will also review the cost-effectiveness of the intervention, compared with standard care, from both the societal and employer’s perspective.

This study is the first in a series of four known as the TANSNIP (Trans-Atlantic Network to Study Stepwise Noninvasive imaging as a Tool for Cardiovascular Prognosis & Prevention) Program. The four studies are designed to understand atherosclerosis in different populations, at different levels of risk and in different settings. The other TANSNIP studies include TANSNIP-H2H (heart to heart), which includes older patients and employs cutting-edge technology and cognitive dysfunction; TANSNIP–BioImage, which explores atherosclerosis progression in middle-aged people in Chicago and Florida; and TANSNIP-Genomics, which examines genomics, proteomics and metabolomics across the populations of the other three TANSNIP studies. TANSNIP seeks to develop lifestyle-changing tools based on non-invasive imaging results of subclinical atherosclerosis presence.

The TANSNIP-PESA project is an international initiative that is being conducted through partnerships with Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the Framingham Heart Study, and the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam.

The TANSNIP Program is funded by a $5 million grant from AstraZeneca.

For more information: www.mountsinaihealth.org

Related Content

Study Shows Multiple Benefits of Patient-to-Patient Connectivity in Familial Chylomicronemia Syndrome
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | August 07, 2018
Akcea Therapeutics Inc., an affiliate of Ionis Pharmaceuticals Inc., announced the publication of results from the...
Being Overweight May Change Young Adults' Heart Structure, Function
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | August 03, 2018
Even as a young adult, being overweight may cause higher blood pressure and thicken heart muscle, setting the stage for...
High Intensity Exercise in Teenagers Could Ward Off Heart Disease

Ultrasound image of the carotid artery. Lines in yellow were used to determine arterial diameter and stretching before and following exercise.

News | Cardiac Diagnostics | July 16, 2018
New research published in Experimental Physiology has indicated potential differences in heart health benefits of...
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | June 14, 2018
A team of researchers says it has linked sensitivity to an allergen in red meat to the buildup of plaque in the...
The blood of patients with familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS) can appear milky in color (lipemic) due to the buildup of fat in their body. Image courtesy of Akcea Therapeutics.

The blood of patients with familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS) can appear milky in color (lipemic) due to the buildup of fat in their body. Image courtesy of Akcea Therapeutics.

 

Feature | Cardiac Diagnostics | May 07, 2018 | Steven D. Freedman, M.D., Ph.D.
 
Male Triathletes May Be Putting Their Heart Health at Risk
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | January 09, 2018
Competitive male triathletes face a higher risk of a potentially harmful heart condition called myocardial fibrosis,...
ERT Acquires iCardiac Technologies
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | December 19, 2017
ERT recently announced it has acquired iCardiac Technologies, a provider of centralized cardiac safety and respiratory...
Overlay Init