News | January 10, 2008

Next Generation of Aspirin Absorbs through Mouth Lining

January 11, 2008 - The latest advancement in aspirin is “Fasprin,” an 81mg tablet that enters the bloodstream through the lining of the mouth after rapidly dissolving on the tongue, which recently launched by Improvita Health Products.

A Fasprin tablet quickly dissolves on the tongue in three to five minutes, enabling the aspirin to enter the blood stream faster than conventional aspirin, which breaks down in the stomach. Clinical trials are currently underway to compare the efficacy of Fasprin with that of enteric-coated aspirin and determine how quickly the dosage reaches the bloodstream.

The company said the ability for aspirin to rapidly enter the blood stream has far-reaching advantages for heart attack and stroke sufferers, whose best line of defense at the first sign of an attack is immediately taking aspirin. Aspirin has been proven to stop blood platelets from sticking together, which reduces the chance for blood clots to form and block arteries.

The low-dose aspirin can be used by people who are on an aspirin regimen as a preventative measure against heart attack and stroke. The company said it is ideal for people who have trouble swallowing conventional aspirin, or experience gastric irritation

For more information: www.improvita.com/Fasprin-news, www.Fasprin.com

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