News | Cardiac Imaging | August 30, 2019

Philips Debuts Cardiac Ultrasound and Enterprise Informatics Offerings at ESC 2019

Company will debut Epiq CVx ultrasound platform in Europe while highlighting integration with LindaCare OnePulse and IntelliSpace Cardiovascular informatics platform to streamline in-hospital and remote follow-up care for patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices

Philips Debuts Cardiac Ultrasound and Enterprise Informatics Offerings at ESC 2019

August 30, 2019 — Philips will showcase its latest cardiac care innovations at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2019, Aug. 31–Sept. 4 in Paris, France. At the congress, Philips is showcasing Release 5.0 of its Epiq CVx cardiovascular ultrasound platform for the first time in Europe. The platform includes automated applications for 2-D assessment of the heart, as well as robust 3-D right ventricle volume and ejection fraction measurements, making accurate exams faster and easier to conduct. Philips also announced that it is collaborating with digital health company LindaCare to combine the latter’s OnePulse cloud-based solution for the remote monitoring of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) with the Philips IntelliSpace Cardiovascular informatics platform.

Philips IntelliSpace Cardiovascular is a web-based image and workflow management platform which streamlines the workflow of cardiology departments and across hospitals by consolidating multimodality images and data and enabling access to an open ecosystem of cardiovascular software applications. The seamless combination of IntelliSpace Cardiovascular with LindaCare’s OnePulse solution allows clinicians to more easily access data from their patients’ CIEDs remotely. This results in a more seamless overall workflow, including alert management and triaging, supporting more proactive care. Philips is also introducing a new module on IntelliSpace Cardiovascular which complements the remote monitoring workflow by automating, standardizing and streamlining reporting for patients with CIEDs during hospital visits. Both the OnePulse interface and the new module will be available on the platform later this year. 

Since 2018, Philips has owned a minority interest in LindaCare through Philips Health Technology Ventures. 

At the ESC Congress 2019 Philips is also highlighting the new advanced automation capabilities available on the Epiq CVx cardiology ultrasound platform. By incorporating advanced automation, there is less variability between scans, leading to confident treatment decisions which benefits patients. The new release of Epiq CVx reduces the number of touches of the system by 21 percent in each exam, which is equivalent to more than 400 exams each year (based on eight scans per day over 48 weeks).

The AutoStrain LV application uses advanced Automatic View Recognition technology to identify the different views of the heart, providing high-quality visualization and analysis of left ventricular function – important diagnostic information for patients at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Also new are the AutoStrain LA and AutoStrain RV applications, which automate the measurement of left atrial and right ventricular longitudinal strain respectively. By creating reliable and reproducible strain measurements for the left ventricle, left atrium and right ventricle, the AutoStrain LV, LA and RV applications support clinicians treating patients with atrial fibrillation, arrhythmia and other complex heart conditions.

During the ESC Congress 2019, Philips will host a Satellite Symposium on Ultrasound featuring worldwide experts. 

For more information: www.usa.philips.com/healthcare

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