News | February 01, 2010

Point-of-Care Troponin-I Test Created for Rapid Detection of Heart Attack

February 1, 2010 – The design have been completed and a patent application filed for a troponin-I self-metering cartridge for the QL Care Analyzer point-of-care (POC) diagnostic device. The system does not require a lab technician. Troponin-I is used to diagnose the presence and severity of a heart attack.

“The completion of the design of the self-metering cartridge is a major milestone in the development of our POC platform,” said Yahia Gawad, CEO of the device maker CardioGenics. “The self-metering cartridge provides our QL Care Analyzer with unprecedented ease of use for a POC diagnostic device, allowing tests to be run on the device by laypersons instead of expensive lab technicians. More importantly, the accuracy of testing will be tremendously improved.”

CardioGenics anticipates receiving the limited production run of the self-metering cartridges during February 2010. Adaptation of the troponin-I test to the self-metering cartridge, along with preparations for beta-site testing, will then follow leading up to the anticipated commencement of beta-site testing in mid-2010 at hospitals and laboratories identified by the company. Beta-site testing will provide the company with the required data regarding the performance of the QL Care Analyzer and the troponin-I test, which will form the basis of the company's 510(k) application to the FDA.

For more information: www.cardiogenics.com

Related Content

High Intensity Exercise in Teenagers Could Ward Off Heart Disease

Ultrasound image of the carotid artery. Lines in yellow were used to determine arterial diameter and stretching before and following exercise.

News | Cardiac Diagnostics | July 16, 2018
New research published in Experimental Physiology has indicated potential differences in heart health benefits of...
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | June 14, 2018
A team of researchers says it has linked sensitivity to an allergen in red meat to the buildup of plaque in the...
The blood of patients with familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS) can appear milky in color (lipemic) due to the buildup of fat in their body. Image courtesy of Akcea Therapeutics.

The blood of patients with familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS) can appear milky in color (lipemic) due to the buildup of fat in their body. Image courtesy of Akcea Therapeutics.

 

Feature | Cardiac Diagnostics | May 07, 2018 | Steven D. Freedman, M.D., Ph.D.
 
Male Triathletes May Be Putting Their Heart Health at Risk
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | January 09, 2018
Competitive male triathletes face a higher risk of a potentially harmful heart condition called myocardial fibrosis,...
ERT Acquires iCardiac Technologies
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | December 19, 2017
ERT recently announced it has acquired iCardiac Technologies, a provider of centralized cardiac safety and respiratory...
New Study Suggests Protein Could Protect Against Coronary Artery Disease

Patients with no obstructed blood flow in the coronary arteries had higher levels of CXCL5 (blue) compared to patients with moderate levels (green) or lower levels (yellow) of CXCL5, who had increased severity of coronary obstructions (indicated by the arrows). Credit: Schisler lab

News | Cardiac Diagnostics | December 07, 2017
December 7, 2017 — The buildup of plaque in the heart’s arteries is an unfortunate part of aging.
E-cigarettes Most Likely to be Used by Alcohol Drinkers and Former Cigarette Smokers, at American Heart Association (AHA), #AHA2017.
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | December 06, 2017
December 6, 2017 — Electronic cigarettes are more frequently used by people who recently quit smoking and alcohol dri
Lack of sleep may cause heart disease in older women. American heart Association, #AHA2017
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | December 06, 2017
December 6, 2017 — Older women who do not get enough sleep were more likely to have poor cardiovascular health, accor
Overlay Init