News | Radial Access | January 15, 2020

SCAI Updates Expert Consensus Statement on Best Practices for Transradial Access

The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) released an updated expert consensus statement for the “SCAI Best Practices for Transradial Angiography and Intervention.”

January 15, 2020 — The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) released an updated expert consensus statement for the best practices for transradial artery access used for diagnostic angiography and interventional procedures. [1]

The new document updates the 2013 publication of the “SCAI Best Practices for Transradial Angiography and Intervention,” because the the body of evidence for both the technical aspects of transradial procedures and their application has changed considerably over the past seven years. Notably, several randomized and observational studies have been conducted to address previously unanswered questions described in the initial publication. In response, SCAI convened a panel of experts to summarize the available contemporary data and reach a consensus on how these findings should be translated into clinical practice.

Read the new Best Practices for Transradial Angiography and Intervention document.

Transradial angiography and intervention continues to become increasingly common as an access site for coronary procedures. SCAI said since the first best practices paper in 2013, ongoing trials have shed further light onto the safest and most efficient methods to perform these procedures. Specifically, this document comments on the use of ultrasound to facilitate radial access, the role of ulnar artery access, the utility of non‐invasive testing of collateral flow, strategies to prevent radial artery occlusion, radial access for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and topics that require further study.

In less than a decade there has been explosive growth in the use of transradial access in the patient's wrist over the previous standard of care using femoral artery access in the groin. Use of radial access in the United States, radial access use went from about 5 percent of procedures to about 50 percent, based on data from the American College of Cardiology (ACC) National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) CathPCI Registry. 

Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Radial Access for Percutaneous Coronary Interventions, an interview at TCT 2019 with Sunil Rao, M.D., and Prashant Kaul, M.D.

Watch a VIDEO of the first author Adhir R. Shroff, M.D., explaining the new guidelines at SCAI 2019.

 

Reference:
1. Adhir R. Shroff MD, MPH, FSCAI (Chair)  Rajiv Gulati MD, PhD, FSCAI (Co‐Chair)  Douglas E. Drachman MD, FSCAI  Dmitriy N. Feldman MD, FSCAI  Ian C. Gilchrist MD, FSCAI, et al. SCAI expert consensus statement update on best practices for transradial angiography and intervention. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions. First published: 27 December 2019 https://doi.org/10.1002/ccd.28672
 

Related Content

SpectraWave is developing a a new intravascular imaging system that combines two currently available modalities. This likely includes optical coherence tomography (OCT), left, which can define structures within the vessel and vessel wall.  Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), right, enables a spectral chemical analysis of the vessel walls to show areas of high lipid content, and specifically can identify lipid-core plaques that are associated with heart attack-causing plaque ruptures.

News | Cath Lab | February 16, 2021
February 16, 2021 – SpectraWave Inc.
Videos | Cath Lab | February 04, 2021
Cindy Grines, M.D., MSCAI, FACC, president
Among high-risk, chronic, coronary patients who undergo angioplasty, there were no additional benefits from ticagrelor compared to the current standard of care clopidogrel. #AHA #AHA20 #AHA2020
News | Cath Lab | November 16, 2020
November 16, 2020 — The use of the more potent antiplatelet medication ticagrelor (Brilinta) was not superior to clop
A large subgroup analysis of the VOYAGER PAD randomized clinical trial showed neither a mortality risk nor benefit associated with the use of paclitaxel drug-coated devices (DCD) in the treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD). The study also found that the benefit of rivaroxaban use on reducing ischemic limb and cardiovascular outcomes was consistent regardless of whether a DCD was used. #TCT2020 #TCTconnect
Feature | Cath Lab | October 18, 2020
October 18, 2020 – A large subgroup analysis of a randomized clinical trial showed neither a mortality risk nor benef
A longitudinal vessel assessment may demonstrate co-existence of multiple plaque morphologies on OCT, including superficial calcification with thrombus, healed plaque, plaque rupture, lipidic plaque with a thin capped fibrous atheroma (TCFA). #TCTconnect #TCT2020

A longitudinal vessel assessment may demonstrate co-existence of multiple plaque morphologies on OCT, including superficial calcification with thrombus, healed plaque, plaque rupture, lipidic plaque with a thin cap fibro-atheroma (TCFA).

News | Cath Lab | October 18, 2020
October 18, 2020 – Data from the...
The DISRUPT CAD III study showed intravascular lithoplasty from Shockwave Medical was effective in breaking up calcified coronary lesions. #TCT2-0

The DISRUPT CAD III study showed intravascular lithoplasty from Shockwave Medical was effective in breaking up calcified coronary lesions.

Feature | Cath Lab | October 16, 2020
October 15, 2020 — Shockwave Medical's Intravascular Lithotripsy (IVL) system to treat severely calcified coronary ar
Videos | Cath Lab | October 16, 2020
This is an example pf the Shockwave Medical Intravascular Lithotripsy (IVL) catheter system designed to break up heav
Videos | Cath Lab | July 15, 2020
Richard Botto, CVT, RCSA, chief cardiovascular technologist, division of cardiology, cardiac cath lab, offers an over