News | Cardiac Diagnostics | September 12, 2017

Shingles Increases Risk of Heart Attack, Stroke

Study says it is important patients with shingles are made aware of heart disease risk

September 12, 2017 — Contracting shingles, a reactivation of the chickenpox virus, increases a person’s risk of stroke and heart attack, according to a research letter published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, almost 1 out of every 3 people in the United States will develop shingles in their lifetime. Anyone who has suffered from chickenpox may develop shingles; however, the risk of shingles increases as a person gets older.

Researchers in South Korea used the National Health Insurance Service’s “medical check-up” database to identify patients with newly diagnosed herpes zoster—or shingles, stroke and heart attack — using the relevant International Classification of Disease-10 (ICD-10) diagnostics codes.

A total of 519,880 patients were followed from 2003-2013, during this period there were 23,233 cases of shingles. The final cohort of 23,213 was matched with the same number of shingles-free patients to serve as control subjects.

Patients with shingles were more likely to be female and common risk factors for stroke and heart attack — such as old age, high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol — were also more commonly seen in these patients. However, this group was also less likely to smoke, have a lower alcohol intake, more exercise and be part of a higher socioeconomic class.

Shingles was found to raise the risk of a composite of cardiovascular events including heart attack and stroke by 41 percent, the risk of stroke by 35 percent and the risk of heart attack by 59 percent. The risk for stroke was highest in those under 40 years old, a relatively younger population with fewer risks for atherosclerosis. The risks of both stroke and heart attack were highest the first year after the onset of shingles and decreased with time. However, these risks were evenly distributed in the shingles-free group.

“While these findings require further study into the mechanism that causes shingles patients to have an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, it is important that physicians treating these patients make them aware of their increased risk,” said Sung-Han Kim, M.D., Ph.D., a physician in the department of infectious diseases at Asan Medical Center in Seoul and one of the study authors.

For more information: www.onlinejacc.org

Related Content

U.S. Soldiers Have Worse Heart Health Than Civilians
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | June 06, 2019
Active duty Army personnel have worse cardiovascular health compared to people of similar ages in the civilian...
Late Dinner and No Breakfast Worsens Outcomes After Heart Attack
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | May 23, 2019
People who skip breakfast and eat dinner near bedtime have worse outcomes after a heart attack, according to research...
HRS Releases New Expert Consensus Statement on Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | May 14, 2019
The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) released a first-of-its-kind consensus statement with guidance on the evaluation and...
New Best Practices Help Manage Heart Attack Patients Without Significant Signs
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | April 15, 2019
For the first time in the United States, doctors with the American Heart Association (AHA) have outlined best practices...
The most recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance was Siemens Healthineers high-sensitivity troponin I assays (TnIH) for the Atellica IM and ADVIA Centaur XP/XPT in vitro diagnostic analyzers. The test helps in the early diagnosis of myocardial infarctions without the need for serial tropic testing. The time to first results is 10 minutes.

The most recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance was Siemens Healthineers high-sensitivity troponin I assays (TnIH) for the Atellica IM and ADVIA Centaur XP/XPT in vitro diagnostic analyzers. The test helps in the early diagnosis of myocardial infarctions without the need for serial tropic testing. The time to first results is 10 minutes. 

Feature | Cardiac Diagnostics | March 22, 2019 | Linda C. Rogers, Ph.D.
Troponins are a family of proteins found in skeletal and heart (cardiac) muscle fibers that produce muscular contract
ACC/AHA Update Guidance for Preventing Heart Disease; Stroke
Feature | Cardiac Diagnostics | March 18, 2019
The choices we make every day can have a lasting effect on our heart and vascular health. Adopting a heart healthy...
AHA Statement Warns Hookah Smoking May Harm the Heart
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | March 08, 2019
Smoking tobacco in waterpipes, more commonly known as hookahs, results in inhaling toxic chemicals, often at levels...
PTSD Alone Does Not Increase Heart Disease Risk in Veterans
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | February 20, 2019
February 20, 2019 — Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by itself does not explain the...
Hormone Therapy May Increase Cardiovascular Risk During Gender Transition
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | February 18, 2019
Patients receiving hormone therapy as part of their gender-transition treatment had an elevated risk for cardiovascular...
Overlay Init