News | Cardiac PACS | October 17, 2019

USF Health Expands Digisonics System With Vascular Reporting

Vascular reporting module will fully integrate with Epic EMR for full documentation in the USF Health Vascular Surgery Department

USF Health Expands Digisonics System With Vascular Reporting

October 17, 2019 — University of South Florida (USF) Health in Tampa, Fla., has enhanced their use of the Digisonics Cardiovascular Information System to include vascular reporting for improved workflow automation and efficiency.

The Digisonics vascular reporting module, which is compliant with Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) standards and guidelines, will enable the Vascular Surgery Department to quickly document velocities, flow, pressures, clinical indications, findings and general conclusions. Seamless integration with the facility’s doppler ultrasound systems will automate transmission of patient information and measurement data directly into the report, translating to improved turnaround times and accuracy by eliminating redundant data entry workflows.

User-friendly drawing tools allow clinicians to quickly modify built-in vascular diagrams which can be included on the report, depicting a comprehensive view of the patient’s anatomy and disease. Vascular images can be quickly viewed at the workstation via a slideshow mode as well as embedded directly in the report with annotation capabilities.

The Digisonics solution will be fully integrated with the facility’s Epic electronic medical record (EMR) for improved interoperability and ease of use. Clinicians will have the convenience of immediate access to the finalized formatted report (with embedded images and diagrams) and study images directly from a link in the Epic patient record, connected to WebView, Digisonics’ universal viewer application.  

As a result of expanding Digisonics for vascular, USF Health has standardized its reporting across departments for the best quality of patient care.

For more information: www.digisonics.com

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