Technology | December 08, 2014

COR Medical Technologies Launches CORcare System to Improve Cardiovascular Outcomes

Relational database comprises thousands of symptoms, imaging findings and other tools for point-of-care diagnosis

December 8, 2014 – COR Medical Technologies (COR) introduces CORcare, a comprehensive instant outcome support system for rapid and accurate diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up management of patients with acute and chronic, common and rare diseases involving the cardiovascular system. Developed by Vincent Friedewald, M.D., FACC, COR is a relational database comprising thousands of signs and symptoms, imaging findings, laboratory abnormalities, electrocardiographic results, body area networking (BAN) measures, and genomics, as well as drugs and devices used for treatment. CORcare is available to healthcare professionals on a variety of technology platforms including mobile devices. Targeted users of CORcare include physicians, emergency medical technicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, physician groups, hospitals and academic institutions and their students. 

CORcare helps healthcare professionals consider all possible conditions associated with any single or combination of clinical features for rapid assistance in differential diagnosis and narrowing down to the final diagnosis. It is the first system to embed American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association (ACCF/AHA) Guidelines specific to data points within each condition, providing instant graded opinions of leading authorities. This feature fully supports and uses the “Guideline Directed Medical Therapy (GDMT)” initiative of the AHA and ACC.  

Also based on ACCF/AHA Guidelines, CORcare provides order sets for many of the common conditions, a feature proven to reduce physician ordering time by up to 50 percent. After diagnoses and management strategies are in place, CORcare provides a secure platform for patient follow-up – called MyCOR – which includes tools to improve medication adherence and other telemedicine functions.

CORcare has other applications as well, all aimed at improving outcomes, such as a “Structured Primary Experiential Learning (SPEL)” professional education module.

CORcare also provides a means for gathering otherwise unattainable clinical outcome data directly from patients themselves. By incorporating the new ICD-10 coding requirements and appropriate XML structures in database construction, CORcare can be integrated with electronic health records.  

Currently, there are three options to sign up for CORcare: standard, premium and organization. The standard option, which is read-only, is free. The premium option, which is currently available for a 30-day free trial, is $240 a year.

For more information: www.cormedtec.com

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