Technology | February 25, 2009

New HemCon Patch Offers Expanded Uses

February 25, 2009 - The HemCon Patch, a flexible hemostatic dressing from HemCon Medical Technologies Inc., is now available for external, temporary control of bleeding during interventional and diagnostic cardiac catheterization, interventional radiology, electrophysiology and dialysis access procedures. The HemCon Patch reportedly delivers a flexible hemostatic solution where rapid arterial hemostasis is critically important to ensure quality care and safety, reliably and quickly stopping bleeding and minimizing risk of artery damage. “The HemCon Patch is a safe, effective option for achieving hemostasis, and its antibacterial barrier adds a layer of protection against dangerous patient infections,” said Ziyad Hijazi, M.D., director of the Rush Center for Congenital and Structural Heart Disease at Rush University Medical Centers, Chicago. “Using the HemCon Patch, we have been able to decrease our hold times and bed rest requirements in addition to providing improved patient comfort. Its proven efficacy makes it the right non-invasive hemostatic choice for medical professionals who want to improve the standard of patient care and safety while also improving their bottom line." As one of the only hemostatic products to obtain an FDA antibacterial barrier claim, the HemCon Patch provides a barrier against a wide spectrum of micro-organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Enterococcus faecalis (VRE) and Acinetobacter baumannii. This unique barrier may help to reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections for both patients and providers. The HemCon Patch is also ideal for patients that take anticoagulant medications or suffer from clotting or bleeding disorders. For more information: www.hemcon.com

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