Technology | February 13, 2013

Nuclear Medicine Information Systems and BioDose Rebrand, Relaunch Nuclear Image Dose Management Solution

February 13, 2013 — Nuclear Medicine Information Systems LLC (NMIS) and BioDose LLC have been renamed and rebranded as ec2 Software Solutions, company officials announced.

Somerset, N.J.-based NMIS was established in 1985 to help hospital and nuclear pharmacy administrators manage record keeping for nuclear medicine departments in hospitals and medical clinics specializing in nuclear medicine services. BioDose, based out of Las Vegas, was a 1999 spin-off positioned to help nuclear medicine teams implement and manage software needs in the nuclear medicine industry.

Today, the two companies offer industry-leading software solutions that help medical providers navigate the vast and complex administration and regulations of the nuclear medicine industry. The company has approximately 5,500 customers worldwide in hospitals, nuclear pharmacies and out-patient facilities.

"As our two companies evolved, it became clear to us that we needed a unified brand and identity," said CEO Scott Nelson. "We feel that ec2 Software Solutions is a much better way for us to be seen and understood by current and future customers. This rebrand takes our company to a new level."

The company's software also helps facilities move from paper-based environments to fully-electronic document management systems. Doses, histories, batch records and complete regulatory compliance are accurately managed with ec2's suite of software solutions. Many software options are available and are customized to meet individual needs.

In addition to a new name, ec2 Software Solutions' rebrand includes a new logo and supporting marketing materials. A new website is also being launched in the spring.

"Throughout the years, we have listened to our customers and developed comprehensive solutions for all of their needs," added Nelson. "As the industry continues to evolve, our technology and software solutions will continue to exceed customer need and expectation."

For more information: www.ec2software.com

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