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VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging

Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017

Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) meeting. Read the article "CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders."

Recent Videos View all 564 items

Heart Valve Technology | October 19, 2020

David Cohen, M.D., presents late-breaking data from the STS/ACC Transcatheter Valve Registry (TVT) showing the impact of using cerebral embolic protection devices during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). This is the press conference presentation followed by an expert panel discussion at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting.

The stroke rates were initially high in TAVR compared to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), but these rates have decreased in recent years as operators become more proficient during the procedures and the stroke rates are now comparable or lower than SAVR.

Cerebral embolic protection devices were developed to prevent emboli knocked off the aortic walls and from the aortic valve from traveling to the brain. However, this review of embolic protection device performance and use showed 66 percent of the 700 sites in the TVT Registry report not using these devices.

The rate of in-hospital stroke in the embolic protection group of patients was 1.39 percent. The rate of stroke in patients without embolic protection was 1.54 percent. There was no difference inn the rates of death, stroke, major bleeding or device success between these two groups, Cohen said.

The study also included a propensity-weighted analysis where the embolic group has a stroke rate of 1.3 percent and the no protection device group at 1.58 percent. 

Cohen said there was not a significant reduction in in-hospital or 30-day stroke rates. While there its a slight signal toward fewer strokes with embolic protection, he said the findings show clinical equipoise and provide strong rational for ongoing, large-scale randomized, controlled trials to see if embolic protection devices offer meaningful clinical benefit.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

Related TAVR Content:

VIDEO: Tracking Transcatheter Valve Outcomes in the STS-ACC TVT Registry — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

Key TAVR Takeaways From ACC 2020

U.S. TAVR Outcomes Need Improvement Based on TVT Registry Analysis

FDA Approves TAVR for Low-risk Patients Creates A Paradigm Shift in Cardiology

 

Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies | October 19, 2020

Roxana Mehran, M.D., and Marco Valgimiggle, M.D., present the results of the Xience 90/28 trials that evaluated the use of shortened 3-month and 1-month dual-antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) in high-risk bleeding patients. This is the press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting. It is followed by an expert panel discussion on the merits and meaning of the results.

The use of short duration DAPT has been a big topic of discussion at TCT the past few years. The first FDA cleared indication for shortened DAPT was was granted in late September 2020 for the Medtronic Endeavor stent. The data from these two trials will likely lead the Xience to a similar FDA indication expansion. 

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

 

Heart Valve Technology | October 19, 2020

Doctor Hans-Josef Feistritzerm, Heart Center of Leipzig, Germany, presents data on the use of general vs. local anesthesia in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) from the late-breaking SOLVE-TAVI one-year outcomes trial. This is the press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting. It is followed by an expert panel discussion on the merits and meaning of the results.

The results showed both approaches are safe to use and the outcomes are good.

The trial randomized patients to either self-expandable or balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) valves and the procedures used either general or local anesthesia. TAVR centers have been moving toward the procedure becoming a same day surgery to reduce overnight admissions and send them home as an out patient procedure. This can be accomplished using a local anesthesia if transesophageal echo (TEE) is not needed. However, many still use TEE or there are other factors that make this approach more appealing. Local anesthesia generally has a faster recovery time and reduces  potential complications in sicker and older patients.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

Related TAVR Content:

VIDEO: Tracking Transcatheter Valve Outcomes in the STS-ACC TVT Registry — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

Key TAVR Takeaways From ACC 2020

U.S. TAVR Outcomes Need Improvement Based on TVT Registry Analysis

FDA Approves TAVR for Low-risk Patients Creates A Paradigm Shift in Cardiology

 

Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies | October 17, 2020

Gregg Stone, M.D., presents the results of a pooled analysis of randomized trials of bivalirudin virus heparin in acute myocardial infarction patients in a press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting.

The study looked at periprocedural anticoagulation during percutaneous corona intervention in AMI patients. There has been conflicting results reported between several trials looking at which drug is best for anticoagulation during cath procedures.

This study pooled data from 8 studies that included more than 27,000 patients. The data included both STEMI and NSTEMI patients.

The pool analysis found STEMI patients, bivalirudin was associated with reductions mortality, serious bleeding and NACE events, despite higher rates of myocardial infarction  (MI) and stent thrombosis compared with heparin. The mortality benefit of bivalirudin was pronounced in patients with a post-PCI bivalirudin infusion to mitigate MI and stent thrombosis risks. 

In NSTEMI patients, bivalirudin was associated with a reduction in 30 day serious bleeding events, but similar rates of mortality, MI and stent thrombosis compared to heparin.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

Sponsored Videos View all 41 items

Information Technology | April 17, 2019

With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers' investments and best of breed systems. 

Hemodynamic Support Devices | March 06, 2019

Perwaiz Meraj, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of interventional cardiology, assistant professor, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Northwell Health System discusses the importance of hemodynamic support to safely perform a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with prior coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and comorbidities. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

In this video, Meraj discuss a complex coronary intervention of a 77-year-old woman with stage 4 CKD, prior CABG, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, who presented with angina and NSTEMI with an ejection fraction of 40 percent. The team at Northwell consulted with cardiac surgeons and the heart team, and determined that this patient was too high risk for another bypass surgery. Read more on this case.

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

 

Heart Failure | February 13, 2019

William O'Neill, M.D., highlights best practice protocols based on Impella Quality database and real-world evidence showing improved outcomes in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Complex PCI Involving Prior CABG and Comorbidities — Interview with Perwaiz Meraj, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

January 10, 2019

Mark Anderson, M.D., FACS, vice chair of cardiac surgery services and cardiothoracic surgeon at Hackensack University Medical Group, outlines a multi-disciplinary heart team approach in treament decision-making for patients in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

Anderson discusses improving outcomes for patients in cardiogenic shock through the early use of mechanical circulatory support and the development of a shock protocol with the heart team. He outlines Hackensack University Medical Center’s multi-disciplinary, heart team approach in treatment decision-making for patients in cardiogenic shock. The team includes cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists, heart failure specialists and intensivists. 

 

 

Conference Coverage View all 417 items

Heart Valve Technology | October 19, 2020

David Cohen, M.D., presents late-breaking data from the STS/ACC Transcatheter Valve Registry (TVT) showing the impact of using cerebral embolic protection devices during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). This is the press conference presentation followed by an expert panel discussion at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting.

The stroke rates were initially high in TAVR compared to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), but these rates have decreased in recent years as operators become more proficient during the procedures and the stroke rates are now comparable or lower than SAVR.

Cerebral embolic protection devices were developed to prevent emboli knocked off the aortic walls and from the aortic valve from traveling to the brain. However, this review of embolic protection device performance and use showed 66 percent of the 700 sites in the TVT Registry report not using these devices.

The rate of in-hospital stroke in the embolic protection group of patients was 1.39 percent. The rate of stroke in patients without embolic protection was 1.54 percent. There was no difference inn the rates of death, stroke, major bleeding or device success between these two groups, Cohen said.

The study also included a propensity-weighted analysis where the embolic group has a stroke rate of 1.3 percent and the no protection device group at 1.58 percent. 

Cohen said there was not a significant reduction in in-hospital or 30-day stroke rates. While there its a slight signal toward fewer strokes with embolic protection, he said the findings show clinical equipoise and provide strong rational for ongoing, large-scale randomized, controlled trials to see if embolic protection devices offer meaningful clinical benefit.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

Related TAVR Content:

VIDEO: Tracking Transcatheter Valve Outcomes in the STS-ACC TVT Registry — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

Key TAVR Takeaways From ACC 2020

U.S. TAVR Outcomes Need Improvement Based on TVT Registry Analysis

FDA Approves TAVR for Low-risk Patients Creates A Paradigm Shift in Cardiology

 

Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies | October 19, 2020

Roxana Mehran, M.D., and Marco Valgimiggle, M.D., present the results of the Xience 90/28 trials that evaluated the use of shortened 3-month and 1-month dual-antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) in high-risk bleeding patients. This is the press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting. It is followed by an expert panel discussion on the merits and meaning of the results.

The use of short duration DAPT has been a big topic of discussion at TCT the past few years. The first FDA cleared indication for shortened DAPT was was granted in late September 2020 for the Medtronic Endeavor stent. The data from these two trials will likely lead the Xience to a similar FDA indication expansion. 

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

 

Heart Valve Technology | October 19, 2020

Doctor Hans-Josef Feistritzerm, Heart Center of Leipzig, Germany, presents data on the use of general vs. local anesthesia in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) from the late-breaking SOLVE-TAVI one-year outcomes trial. This is the press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting. It is followed by an expert panel discussion on the merits and meaning of the results.

The results showed both approaches are safe to use and the outcomes are good.

The trial randomized patients to either self-expandable or balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) valves and the procedures used either general or local anesthesia. TAVR centers have been moving toward the procedure becoming a same day surgery to reduce overnight admissions and send them home as an out patient procedure. This can be accomplished using a local anesthesia if transesophageal echo (TEE) is not needed. However, many still use TEE or there are other factors that make this approach more appealing. Local anesthesia generally has a faster recovery time and reduces  potential complications in sicker and older patients.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

Related TAVR Content:

VIDEO: Tracking Transcatheter Valve Outcomes in the STS-ACC TVT Registry — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

Key TAVR Takeaways From ACC 2020

U.S. TAVR Outcomes Need Improvement Based on TVT Registry Analysis

FDA Approves TAVR for Low-risk Patients Creates A Paradigm Shift in Cardiology

 

Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies | October 17, 2020

Gregg Stone, M.D., presents the results of a pooled analysis of randomized trials of bivalirudin virus heparin in acute myocardial infarction patients in a press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting.

The study looked at periprocedural anticoagulation during percutaneous corona intervention in AMI patients. There has been conflicting results reported between several trials looking at which drug is best for anticoagulation during cath procedures.

This study pooled data from 8 studies that included more than 27,000 patients. The data included both STEMI and NSTEMI patients.

The pool analysis found STEMI patients, bivalirudin was associated with reductions mortality, serious bleeding and NACE events, despite higher rates of myocardial infarction  (MI) and stent thrombosis compared with heparin. The mortality benefit of bivalirudin was pronounced in patients with a post-PCI bivalirudin infusion to mitigate MI and stent thrombosis risks. 

In NSTEMI patients, bivalirudin was associated with a reduction in 30 day serious bleeding events, but similar rates of mortality, MI and stent thrombosis compared to heparin.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

Cath Lab View all 280 items

Heart Valve Technology | October 19, 2020

David Cohen, M.D., presents late-breaking data from the STS/ACC Transcatheter Valve Registry (TVT) showing the impact of using cerebral embolic protection devices during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). This is the press conference presentation followed by an expert panel discussion at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting.

The stroke rates were initially high in TAVR compared to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), but these rates have decreased in recent years as operators become more proficient during the procedures and the stroke rates are now comparable or lower than SAVR.

Cerebral embolic protection devices were developed to prevent emboli knocked off the aortic walls and from the aortic valve from traveling to the brain. However, this review of embolic protection device performance and use showed 66 percent of the 700 sites in the TVT Registry report not using these devices.

The rate of in-hospital stroke in the embolic protection group of patients was 1.39 percent. The rate of stroke in patients without embolic protection was 1.54 percent. There was no difference inn the rates of death, stroke, major bleeding or device success between these two groups, Cohen said.

The study also included a propensity-weighted analysis where the embolic group has a stroke rate of 1.3 percent and the no protection device group at 1.58 percent. 

Cohen said there was not a significant reduction in in-hospital or 30-day stroke rates. While there its a slight signal toward fewer strokes with embolic protection, he said the findings show clinical equipoise and provide strong rational for ongoing, large-scale randomized, controlled trials to see if embolic protection devices offer meaningful clinical benefit.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

Related TAVR Content:

VIDEO: Tracking Transcatheter Valve Outcomes in the STS-ACC TVT Registry — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

Key TAVR Takeaways From ACC 2020

U.S. TAVR Outcomes Need Improvement Based on TVT Registry Analysis

FDA Approves TAVR for Low-risk Patients Creates A Paradigm Shift in Cardiology

 

Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies | October 19, 2020

Roxana Mehran, M.D., and Marco Valgimiggle, M.D., present the results of the Xience 90/28 trials that evaluated the use of shortened 3-month and 1-month dual-antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) in high-risk bleeding patients. This is the press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting. It is followed by an expert panel discussion on the merits and meaning of the results.

The use of short duration DAPT has been a big topic of discussion at TCT the past few years. The first FDA cleared indication for shortened DAPT was was granted in late September 2020 for the Medtronic Endeavor stent. The data from these two trials will likely lead the Xience to a similar FDA indication expansion. 

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

 

Heart Valve Technology | October 19, 2020

Doctor Hans-Josef Feistritzerm, Heart Center of Leipzig, Germany, presents data on the use of general vs. local anesthesia in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) from the late-breaking SOLVE-TAVI one-year outcomes trial. This is the press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting. It is followed by an expert panel discussion on the merits and meaning of the results.

The results showed both approaches are safe to use and the outcomes are good.

The trial randomized patients to either self-expandable or balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) valves and the procedures used either general or local anesthesia. TAVR centers have been moving toward the procedure becoming a same day surgery to reduce overnight admissions and send them home as an out patient procedure. This can be accomplished using a local anesthesia if transesophageal echo (TEE) is not needed. However, many still use TEE or there are other factors that make this approach more appealing. Local anesthesia generally has a faster recovery time and reduces  potential complications in sicker and older patients.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

Related TAVR Content:

VIDEO: Tracking Transcatheter Valve Outcomes in the STS-ACC TVT Registry — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

Key TAVR Takeaways From ACC 2020

U.S. TAVR Outcomes Need Improvement Based on TVT Registry Analysis

FDA Approves TAVR for Low-risk Patients Creates A Paradigm Shift in Cardiology

 

Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies | October 17, 2020

Gregg Stone, M.D., presents the results of a pooled analysis of randomized trials of bivalirudin virus heparin in acute myocardial infarction patients in a press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting.

The study looked at periprocedural anticoagulation during percutaneous corona intervention in AMI patients. There has been conflicting results reported between several trials looking at which drug is best for anticoagulation during cath procedures.

This study pooled data from 8 studies that included more than 27,000 patients. The data included both STEMI and NSTEMI patients.

The pool analysis found STEMI patients, bivalirudin was associated with reductions mortality, serious bleeding and NACE events, despite higher rates of myocardial infarction  (MI) and stent thrombosis compared with heparin. The mortality benefit of bivalirudin was pronounced in patients with a post-PCI bivalirudin infusion to mitigate MI and stent thrombosis risks. 

In NSTEMI patients, bivalirudin was associated with a reduction in 30 day serious bleeding events, but similar rates of mortality, MI and stent thrombosis compared to heparin.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

Cardiac Imaging View all 261 items

Artificial Intelligence | September 25, 2020

Ernest Garcia, Ph.D., MASNC, FAHA, endowed professor in cardiac imaging, director of nuclear cardiology R&D laboratory, Emory University, developer of the Emory Cardiac Tool Box used in nuclear imaging and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in cardiac imaging. He said there is a tsunami of new AI applications that are starting to flood the FDA for market approval, and there are several examples of AI already in use in cardiac imaging. He spoke on this topic in a keynote session at the 2020 ASNC meeting.

Related Artificial Intelligence in Cardiology Content:

VIDEO: Machine Learning for Diagnosis and Risk Prediction in Nuclear Cardiology — Interview with Piotr J. Slomka, Ph.D.,

Artificial Intelligence Applications in Cardiology

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Improve Cath Lab Interventions — Interview with Nick West, M.D., Abbott CMO

How Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence for Echocardiography at Mass General — Interview with Judy Hung, M.D.

VIDEO: ACC Efforts to Advance Evidence-based Implementation of AI in Cardiovascular Care — Interview with John Rumsfeld, M.D.

VIDEO: Overview of Artificial Intelligence and its Use in Cardiology — Interview with Anthony Chang, M.D.

For more AI in cardiology content

 

Pharmaceuticals | September 10, 2020

Matthew Budoff, M.D., director of cardiovascular CT at The Lundquist Institute, and professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, presented the  EVAPORATE Study final results at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2020 Congress. He explains how cardiac CT was used to monitor patients taking icosapent ethyl (Vascepa) showed it showed a 17 percent reversal of low attenuation plaques in the coronary arteries.

Final results from Effect of Icosapent Ethyl on Progression of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Patients with Elevated Triglycerides on Statin Therapy (EVAPORATE) Trial showed a significant reduction in the primary endpoint of icosapent ethyl reducing LAP plaque volume from baseline. Whereas there was a progression of LAP plaque volume in the placebo group. There were significant differences between icosapent ethyl and placebo at study end for secondary endpoints of other types of plaque volume changes, including and sequentially total, total non-calcified, fibrofatty, and fibrous plaque volumes. All regressed in the icosapent ethyl group and progressed in the placebo group, (p<0.01 for all). The only secondary endpoint which did not achieve a significant difference between groups in multivariable modeling was dense calcium (p=0.053).

Read more in the article "Icosapent Ethyl Significantly Reduces Coronary Plaque in EVAPORATE Study."

Find more ESC news

 

 

Remote Viewing Systems | August 19, 2020

Enterprise viewers are designed to provide fast and easy access to a patient’s imaging history, and today’s modern healthcare systems require a clinical viewer capable of meeting the diverse needs of a large group of users. GE Healthcare’s Zero Footprint Viewer can quickly and easily display digital images, video clips and cine loops from any department and on many different devices.

It provides access to images and reports from anywhere, whether it’s on the hospital floor, in surgery, in clinic or at home, to allow clinicians to access and develop clinical insights that deliver patient results and drive operational efficiencies.

Learn more at https://www.gehealthcare.com/products/healthcare-it/enterprise-imaging/centricity-universal-viewer-zero-footprint

 

Cardiac Diagnostics View all 65 items

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | September 29, 2020

Deepika Thacker, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist with Nemours Children’s Health System, Wilmington, Del., helped discover one of the first cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) in the United States. She explains how they treated the first and subsequent pediatric patients with the COVID-19 related syndrome. Read more about the first case of MIS-C Nemours treated in the article Case Study Describes One of the First U.S. Cases of MIS-C.

The dangerous Kawasaki Disease-like syndrome occurs in a small number of children exposed to the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) virus. MIS-C is an autoimmune reaction where the COVID appears asymptomatic, but the immune system overeacts to the virus and begins attacking health tissues in the body. It causes severe causes inflammation of the heart, lungs and other vital organs.

 

CDC Reports 800 U.S. Children Diagnosed With MIC-C

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported as of Sept. 10, 2020, there have been 792 confirmed cases in the United States of the rare MIS-C condition in children that is linked to COVID-19.

The agency also reported there have been 16 deaths reported from the MIS-C cases reported in 42 states, New York City and Washington, D.C., as of Sept. 3. Nearly all cases of MIS-C occurred in children who tested positive for the new coronavirus, while the remainder were in children who were around a person with COVID-19.

The CDC report also gave the following statistics:

   • Most cases are in children between the ages of 1 and 14 years, with an average age of 8 years.
   • Cases have occurred in children from <1 year old to 20 years old.
   • More than 70% of reported cases have occurred in children who are Hispanic/Latino (276 cases) or non-Hispanic Black (230 cases).
   • 99% of cases (783) tested positive for SARS CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The remaining 1% were around someone with COVID-19.
   • Most children developed MIS-C 2-4 weeks after infection with SARS-CoV-2.
   • Slightly more than half (54%) of reported cases were male.
 

Find additional CDC statistics on U.S. MIS-C cases

 

Related Content on MIS-C:

Kawasaki-like Inflammatory Disease Affects Children With COVID-19

Case Study Describes One of the First U.S. Cases of MIS-C

NIH-funded Project Wants to Identify Children at Risk for MIS-C From COVID-19

New Study Looks at Post-COVID-19 Emerging Disease in Children

Cardiac MRI Aids Evaluation of Children With Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS-C) Associated With COVID-19

The Cardiovascular Impact of COVID-19

VIDEO: Example of a Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) Pediatric Echocardiogram

NIH-funded Project Wants to Identify Children at Risk for MIS-C From COVID-19

Cardiac Imaging | August 12, 2020

Advanced visualization company Medis recently purchased Advanced Medical Imaging Development S.r.l. (AMID), which developed software to automatically track and measure strain in echocardiograms. That technology is now being adapted for strain imaging in CT and MRI. Using this imaging data, the software also can noninvasively derive pressure gradient loops and curves, similar to using invasive pulmonary arterial (PA) hemodynamic pressure catheters. This information is useful in monitoring critically ill patients on hemodynamic support and to monitor worsening severity of heart failure. 

The technology was discussed at the 2020 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) virtual meeting. Examples of this technology are presented in this video. 
 

Find more news and video from SCCT 2020

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography
 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 28, 2020

Interview with Andrew D. Krahn, M.D.,FHRS, head of the division of cardiology at St. Paul’s Hospital, and professor of medicine at the University of British Columbia, and vice president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). He is an expert in long QT syndrome (LQTS) and is involved with the National Long QT Registry. He explains the issues with the drugs being used to treat coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) patients and why these combined with the cardiac impact of the virus is causing prolonged ECG QT segment prolongation, leading to deadly arrhythmias. COVID-19 can cause myocarditis that causes QT prolongation and the front-line COVID drugs hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin also cause QT prolongation.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a Drug Safety Communication April 23, 2020, reminding doctors there are serious side effects when using hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine in the off-label use to treat COVID-19 patients. This includes potentially life-threatening heart rhythm problems. The FDA said case reports from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System database, published medical literature and the American Association of Poison Control Centers National Poison Data System are reporting serious heart-related adverse events and patient deaths. Read more about this alert.

The FDA warning confirmed fears from the American Heart Association (AHA), the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). These societies April 8 jointly published a new guidance, “Considerations for Drug Interactions on QTc in Exploratory COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 19) Treatment,” to detail critical cardiovascular considerations in the use of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin for the treatment of COVID-19. The societies warned that use of  these agents in a large number of patients in combination would results in arrhythmias and deaths. Read more.

However, there are numerous advocates that argue hydroxychloroquine needs to be used in less sick patients who are not already hypoxic to treat COVID, but it is being used primarily in very sick patients where it is not effective. Advocates also argue the drug can be used to help prevent coronavirus, similar to the drug's effect in preventing malaria. In terms of drug safety, advocates argue the drug has been used in millions of patients for more than 50 years without a high risk of arrhythmias. Several trials are now underway in the United States to test its use against COVID-19, but enrollment has been hampered because of the FDA warning. There will likely be more interest in hydroxychloroquine after it was revealed May 18, 2020, that President Trump is taking the drug for prophylaxis against COVID-19.

 

Related Hydroxychloroquine Content:

FDA Revokes Emergency Use Authorization for Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19

WHO Database Shows Serious Health Impact of Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin Being Used to Treat COVID-19

VIDEO: Overview of Hydroxychloroquine and FDA Warning in its use to Treat COVID-19 — Interview with Marianne Pop, Pharm.D.

WHO Database Shows Serious Health Impact of Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin Being Used to Treat COVID-19

COVID-19 Hydroxychloroquine Treatment Brings Prolonged QT Arrhythmia Issues

 

FDA Reports of Deaths and Injuries From Use of Antimalarial hydroxychloroquine in COVID-19 Patients

VIDEO: Cardiologists Manage Trial Testing if Hydroxychloroquine Protects Clinicians From COVID-19 — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

First Large-scale U.S. Study on Hydroxychloroquine COVID-19 Prophylaxis Begins in Detroit

AHA, ACC, HRS Caution Use of COVID-19 Therapies Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin in Cardiac Patients

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 22, 2020

Justin Fried, M.D., Attending cardiologist at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York City, and assistant professor at at Columbia University and lead author on a report that explains the cardiovascular presentations of COVID-19. The study looked at four patient cases where cardiology became involved in the patient's care.

Novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) can present as a cardiovascular issue, or patients can develop myocarditis or cardiogenic shock as the virus progresses. SARS-CoV-2 has a much higher mortality rate in patients with comorbiditities, but is highest in patients with comorbidities like heart failure and coronary artery disease. Fried said these conditions are exacerbated by COVID-19.

"We tried to put together some of the observations we noted in our early experiences in these patients at out center with manifestations of COVID-19," explained Fried. "We are seeing significant cardiac involvement, but it is important to note that many of our patients with underlying cardiovascular disease, notably heart failure and coronary disease, are developing significant effects form COVID-19 that is destabilizing conditions, and that presents unique challenge. I worry most about our patients who have underlying cardiovascular disease, which can be exacerbated by COVID-19."

Read more details in the article "New York City Physicians Note Multiple Cardiovascular Presentations of COVID-19."

 

Other Impact of COVID-19 on Cardiology Content:

VIDEO: 9 Cardiologists Share COVID-19 Takeaways From Across the U.S.

VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on the Interventional Cardiology Program at Henry Ford Hospital — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

Image Gallery Showing Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic

ACC COVID-19 Clinical Guidance For the Cardiovascular Care Team

VIDEO: COVID-19 Precautions for Cardiac Imaging — Interview with Stephen Bloom, M.D.

Rapid Drop in Heart Attacks and Stroke at Hospitals Concerns ACC 

VIDEO: Cancelling Non-essential Cardiac Procedures During the COVID-19 Outbreak — an interview with SCCT President Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D.

VIDEO: Telemedicine in Cardiology and Medical Imaging During COVID-19 — Interview with Regina Druz, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

EP Lab View all 74 items

Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) Occluders | October 02, 2020

Horst Sievert, M.D., is the director of the Cardiovascular Center Frankfurt, and associate professor of internal medicine-cardiology at the University of Frankfurt. He discusses left atrial appendage (LAA) device advances and new developments for more effective LAA closure to reduce the stroke risk in atrial fibrillation (AFib or AF) patients and new developments for more effective LAA closure to reduce the stroke risk in atrial fibrillation (AFib or AF) patients.

He said there are current limitations using the Boston Scientific Watchman FLX and Abbott Amplatzer Amulet devices. One of the new concepts in transcatheter LAA occlusion technology from Append Medical is a suture delivery system that eliminate permanent metal implants and mimics a surgical suture closure without the need for an open chest procedure.

Sievert has more than 30 years experience in cardiology and has been the principal investigator in a number of clinical trials and has authored more than 130 manuscripts and 500 abstracts in peer-reviewed journals and 50 books and book contributions. He is also chairman of Scientific Advisory for Append Medical, developer of a novel LAA closure device.

Read more about the Append device — First-Of-Its-Kind, No-Implant LAA Occluder Noted for Innovation at 2019 ICI Meeting
 

Find more LAA occluder technology news

 

EP Lab | October 01, 2020

Peter Weiss M.D., MSc, director of ventricular arrhythmia management and robotics, and assistant clinical professor of medicine at the Heart Institute, Banner University of Arizona Medical Center, Phoenix, takes a video tour of Banner's new robotic electrophysiology (EP) lab. It is the site of the first U.S. install of the Stereotaxis Genesis robotic system. It is a smaller, more refined system from the earlier generation from a decade ago. Weiss performs a guided tour of the lab and its mapping technologies. 

 

Related EP Robotic Systems Content:

VIDEO: Advantages of Robotic Ablation in the EP Lab — Interview with Peter Weiss, M.D.

Time to Take Another Look at Robotics in Electrophysiology — Article by Peter Weiss, M.D.

Stereotaxis Announces Next-generation Robotic Magnetic Navigation and Imaging Systems

Stereotaxis and Acutus Medical Announce Strategic Collaboration
 

Find more news on robotic cath lab and EP lab systems

EP Lab | September 30, 2020

Peter Weiss M.D., MSc, director of ventricular arrhythmia management and robotics, and assistant clinical professor of medicine at the Heart Institute, Banner University of Arizona Medical Center, Phoenix, explains the advantages of using robotic navigation in the electrophysiology (EP) lab. He has used Stereotaxis robots for the past decade to reduce fluoro imaging and improve ablation outcomes. Banner just opened a new robotic EP lab with a Stereotaxis Genesis system, the first to be installed in the U.S. and only the second install in the world.

 

Related EP Robotic Systems Content:

VIDEO: Virtual Tour of the Robotic Electrophysiology Lab at Banner Health — Interview with Peter Weiss, M.D.

Time to Take Another Look at Robotics in Electrophysiology — Article by Peter Weiss, M.D.

Stereotaxis Announces Next-generation Robotic Magnetic Navigation and Imaging Systems

Stereotaxis and Acutus Medical Announce Strategic Collaboration
 

Find more news on robotic cath lab and EP lab systems

 

EP Lab | July 28, 2020

Devi G. Nair, M.D., FHRS, director of cardiac electrophysiology, St. Bernards Heart and Vascular Center, Jonesboro, Ark., explains the impact of COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) on her EP program and what was done to continue operations and recover procedural volume. She also shares how EP played a role in the team approach to treating coronavirus patients at her center.

Her experience is an example of how centers have dealt with issues related to the pandemic, including shutting down elective procedures, treating emergent cases, reopening services, new safety precautions and how telehealth played a role.

Nair is also chairman for the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) member engagement sub-committee and is a board member of the Arkansas chapter of the American College of Cardiology (ACC).

Watch Nair in this interview — VIDEO: Overview of LAA Occlusion Using the Watchman FLX

 

 

Related COVID-19 Cardiology Content:

VIDEO: Why QT-prolongation Occurs in COVID-19 Patients on Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin — Interview with Andrew Krahn, M.D.

The Cardiovascular Impact of COVID-19

How Cardiology Dealt With the COVID-19 Surge in New York City

Kawasaki-like Inflammatory Disease Affects Children With COVID-19 

 

VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on the Interventional Cardiology Program at Henry Ford Hospital — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

ACC COVID-19 Clinical Guidance For the Cardiovascular Care Team

FDA Reports of Deaths and Injuries From Use of Antimalarial hydroxychloroquine in COVID-19 Patients

New Research Highlights Blood Clot Dangers of COVID-19

 

How to Manage AMI Patients During the COVID-19 Pandemic 

Older Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients May Have Increased Risk of Bradycardia With Lopinavir and Ritonavir

VIDEO: Where Have all the STEMI Cases Gone Amid COVID-19? — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

Information Technology View all 156 items

Artificial Intelligence | September 25, 2020

Ernest Garcia, Ph.D., MASNC, FAHA, endowed professor in cardiac imaging, director of nuclear cardiology R&D laboratory, Emory University, developer of the Emory Cardiac Tool Box used in nuclear imaging and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in cardiac imaging. He said there is a tsunami of new AI applications that are starting to flood the FDA for market approval, and there are several examples of AI already in use in cardiac imaging. He spoke on this topic in a keynote session at the 2020 ASNC meeting.

Related Artificial Intelligence in Cardiology Content:

VIDEO: Machine Learning for Diagnosis and Risk Prediction in Nuclear Cardiology — Interview with Piotr J. Slomka, Ph.D.,

Artificial Intelligence Applications in Cardiology

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Improve Cath Lab Interventions — Interview with Nick West, M.D., Abbott CMO

How Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence for Echocardiography at Mass General — Interview with Judy Hung, M.D.

VIDEO: ACC Efforts to Advance Evidence-based Implementation of AI in Cardiovascular Care — Interview with John Rumsfeld, M.D.

VIDEO: Overview of Artificial Intelligence and its Use in Cardiology — Interview with Anthony Chang, M.D.

For more AI in cardiology content

 

Artificial Intelligence | September 21, 2020

Nick West, M.D., chief medical officer for Abbott, explains the details from a survey of 1,400 patients, physicians and healthcare executives in an effort to understand the needs to guide future technology development. Artificial intelligence (AI) is being looked at as a way to better personalize medicine. In the cath lab, AI might be used to help interpret intravascular images as a second set of eyes for the physician. AI also might enable immediate feedback on how to proceed with a case based on current guidelines and clinical evidence.

Read more about the survey in the article "Emerging Technology and Data Key to Closing Treatment Gaps to Improve Cardiovascular Care."

See Part 1 of this video where west describes the key findings of the survey in the VIDEO: Survey Shows Large Disconnect in Medical Technology Across Continuum of Care.

 

 

Cardiovascular Business | September 14, 2020

Nick West, M.D., chief medical officer for Abbott, explains the details from a survey of 1,400 patients, physicians and healthcare executives in an effort to understand the high-level issues regarding the use of technology in medicine, the gaps in communication, and patient perceptions to guide future technology development. 

Four high-level observations emerged from our study:

1. Patients are frustrated by the level of care they’re receiving – they understandably want a personalized healthcare experience “tailored for me,” across the care continuum.

2. Physicians lament the lack of time they have to spend with patients, their limited visibility into patient adherence to treatment and lifestyle changes, and challenges with other key factors that influence the quality of care they can provide.

3. Administrators are pressured to deliver patient satisfaction and reduce costs across multiple departments.

4. Diagnostic and data-driven technology holds the promise to move care from a point-in-time, intervention-only focus to a more holistic “whole patient” view by improving the accuracy of
diagnosis, appropriate interventions as required, and evidence-based post-procedural care.

Read more about the survey in the article "Emerging Technology and Data Key to Closing Treatment Gaps to Improve Cardiovascular Care."

See Part 2 of this video where West describes the how AI might be used in interventional cardiology in the VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Improve Cath Lab Interventions.

Remote Viewing Systems | August 19, 2020

Enterprise viewers are designed to provide fast and easy access to a patient’s imaging history, and today’s modern healthcare systems require a clinical viewer capable of meeting the diverse needs of a large group of users. GE Healthcare’s Zero Footprint Viewer can quickly and easily display digital images, video clips and cine loops from any department and on many different devices.

It provides access to images and reports from anywhere, whether it’s on the hospital floor, in surgery, in clinic or at home, to allow clinicians to access and develop clinical insights that deliver patient results and drive operational efficiencies.

Learn more at https://www.gehealthcare.com/products/healthcare-it/enterprise-imaging/centricity-universal-viewer-zero-footprint