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VIDEO: How to Reduce COVID Exposure, Speed Exams and Cut Readmissions in Cardiology Departments

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | November 11, 2020

Keith Ellis, M.D., is the director of cardiovascular services and the director of the Chest Pain Center at Houston Methodist Sugar Land Hospital, and has been the director of nuclear cardiology for Diagnostic Cardiology of Houston. He explains how his department has implemented protocols and new technology to mitigate COVID-19 contamination risks and to prevent readmissions. New technologies include the use of telemedicine, CT angiography, and a contrast reduction system in the cath lab to prevent kidney injury that would result in a patient readmission. The hospital also is using techniques to help cut procedure times, including use of radial access in the cath lab and abbreviated nuclear scan protocols to shorten exam times.

He said there can be a lot of cardiovascular involvement in severe COVID patients, ranging from development of myocarditis, STEMI with and without clots, arrhythmias, venous thromboembolism (VTE), and the need for hemodynamic support, including ECMO. He said the most surprising management issue with the COVID patients has been the large amount of VTE, often resulting in deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (PE). Ellis said this often requires interventional strategies, including the use of Ekos ultrasonic catheter based thrombolysis to break up the clots.

 

Related Cardiac COVID-19 Content:

COVID-19 Positive STEMI Patients Have Higher Mortality 

VIDEO: ECMO Hemodynamic Support Effective in Sickest COVID-19 Patients — Interview with Ryan Barbaro, M.D.

The Cardiovascular Impact of COVID-19

VIDEO: Multiple Cardiovascular Presentations of COVID-19 in New York — Interview with Justin Fried, M.D., explaining a case that used VV-ECMO abnd VAV-ECMO

 

VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on the Interventional Cardiology Program at Henry Ford Hospital — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

Kawasaki-like Inflammatory Disease Affects Children With COVID-19 

VIDEO: Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — Interview with Hicham Skali, M.D.

VIDEO: Cancelling Non-essential Cardiac Procedures During the COVID-19 Outbreak — Interview with Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D. 

 

VIDEO: 9 Cardiologists Share COVID-19 Takeaways From Across the U.S.  

VIDEO: Telemedicine in Cardiology and Medical Imaging During COVID-19 — Interview with Regina Druz, M.D.

VIDEO: COVID-19 Precautions for Cardiac Imaging — Interview with Stephen Bloom, M.D.,

Find more cardiology related COVID-19 content

 

Cath Lab

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | November 10, 2020

Keith Ellis, M.D., is the director of cardiovascular services and the director of the Chest Pain Center at Houston Methodist Sugar Land Hospital, and has been the director of nuclear cardiology for Diagnostic Cardiology of Houston. He explains how his department has implemented protocols and new technology to mitigate COVID-19 contamination risks and to prevent readmissions. New technologies include the use of telemedicine, CT angiography, and a contrast reduction system in the cath lab to prevent kidney injury that would result in a patient readmission. The hospital also is using techniques to help cut procedure times, including use of radial access in the cath lab and abbreviated nuclear scan protocols to shorten exam times.

He said there can be a lot of cardiovascular involvement in severe COVID patients, ranging from development of myocarditis, STEMI with and without clots, arrhythmias, venous thromboembolism (VTE), and the need for hemodynamic support, including ECMO. He said the most surprising management issue with the COVID patients has been the large amount of VTE, often resulting in deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (PE). Ellis said this often requires interventional strategies, including the use of Ekos ultrasonic catheter based thrombolysis to break up the clots.

 

Related Cardiac COVID-19 Content:

COVID-19 Positive STEMI Patients Have Higher Mortality 

VIDEO: ECMO Hemodynamic Support Effective in Sickest COVID-19 Patients — Interview with Ryan Barbaro, M.D.

The Cardiovascular Impact of COVID-19

VIDEO: Multiple Cardiovascular Presentations of COVID-19 in New York — Interview with Justin Fried, M.D., explaining a case that used VV-ECMO abnd VAV-ECMO

 

VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on the Interventional Cardiology Program at Henry Ford Hospital — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

Kawasaki-like Inflammatory Disease Affects Children With COVID-19 

VIDEO: Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — Interview with Hicham Skali, M.D.

VIDEO: Cancelling Non-essential Cardiac Procedures During the COVID-19 Outbreak — Interview with Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D. 

 

VIDEO: 9 Cardiologists Share COVID-19 Takeaways From Across the U.S.  

VIDEO: Telemedicine in Cardiology and Medical Imaging During COVID-19 — Interview with Regina Druz, M.D.

VIDEO: COVID-19 Precautions for Cardiac Imaging — Interview with Stephen Bloom, M.D.,

Find more cardiology related COVID-19 content

 

Hemodynamic Support Devices | October 20, 2020

Chuck Simonton, M.D., chief medical officer at Abiomed, discusses some of the new technologies and clinical trials the company is working on and highlighted hemodynamic presentations at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting.

In this interview Simonton discusses:
   • The new Impella 5.5 device
   • The new Impella ECP expandable pump that collapses to a very small diameter to aid vascular access is about to start first-in-human trials.
   • Smart Assist technology that will incorporated artificial intelligence (AI) to better monitor Impella patients.
   • The Door to Unloading (DTU) Trial that is using Impella first in STEMI patients prior to PCI to prevent reperfusion injury
   •The PROTECT III and IV trials. 

Prior Abiomed, Simonton was the CMO at Abbott Vascular, and was a practicing interventional cardiologist for nearly 30 years at Duke University Medical Center and then at the Sanger Clinic. At Sanger he created his own research team to study patient outcomes following the use of new cardiac technologies. He also founded the Carolinas Cardiovascular Research Foundation at the Carolinas Heart Institute, now part of Atrium Health.
 

Find more TCT news, video and the late-breaking studies

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | October 20, 2020

Chuck Simonton, M.D., chief medical officer at Abiomed, explains when advanced hemodynamic support in required in COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) patients. Abiomed received two FDA emergency use authorizations in 2020 to use Impella is certain clinical circumstances, including a provision to use the Impella RP for right heart failure in COVID patients and for the Impella CP to be used in tandem with ECMO to help support critially ill COVID patients.

Find more cardiology related COVID news 

 

Cath Lab | October 19, 2020

Dean Kereiakes, M.D., medical director, The Christ Hospital Heart and Vascular Center, medical director, The Christ Hospital Research Institute, and professor of clinical medicine at The Ohio State University, explains the late-breaking Disrupt CAD III study at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting. 

The trial will likely pave the way for U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for intravascular lithotripsy to be used in the coronary arteries. He offers details on the data and and use of this technology in the cath lab compared to the current techniques of atherectomy, cutting balloons and high pressure balloons that can cause vessel trauma, leading to poorer outcomes. 

The lithotripsy technology breaks up calcium in the vessel walls without trauma, using a compliant balloon and relying on sonic waves to bust the calcium rather than brute force. He said this could be a paradigm shift in how calcified lesions are treated.

Read more on this trial and the technology in the article Shockwave Technology to Sonically Bust Calcified Coronary Lesions Shows Safety and Efficacy in U.S. Pivotal IDE Trial.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies | October 19, 2020

The COMPARE CRUSH Trial looked at the effect of pre-hospital crushed prasugrel tablets in patients with STEMI planned for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).[1] This video is of the press conference presentation of this late-breaking study by doctor George Vlachojannis, from UMC Utrecht, at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting. 

The idea was to crush the tablets to enable faster antiplatelet inhibition, but the findings of this study showed it did not improve TIMI 3 flow on first angiography or ST-segment resolution at 1 hour post PCI.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

Reference:

1. Vlachojannis GJ, Vogel RF, Wilschut JM, Lemmert ME, Delewi R, Diletti R, van Vliet R, van der Waarden N, Nuis RJ, Paradies V, Alexopoulos D, Zijlstra F, Montalescot G, Angiolillo DJ, Krucoff MW, Van Mieghem NM, Smits PC. COMPARison of pre-hospital CRUSHed vs. uncrushed Prasugrel tablets in patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary interventions: Rationale and design of the COMPARE CRUSH trial. Am Heart J. 2020 Jun;224:10-16. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2020.03.005. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

 

Stents Drug Eluting | October 19, 2020

Dean Kereiakes, M.D., medical director, The Christ Hospital Heart and Vascular Center, medical director, The Christ Hospital Research Institute, and professor of clinical medicine at The Ohio State University, explains the late-breaking OPTIMIZE Trial at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting. 

OPTIMIZE looked at the safety and efficacy of the novel Svelte drug eluting stent (DES). It is a thin strut cobalt chromium stent that uses a bioresorbable amino acid-based drug carrier to elute sirolimus. It also was designed specifically for transradial access and direct stenting with a very low crossing profile. 

The trial showed the device did not meet non inferiority for existing DES by a small margin, but there were questions raised about the criteria used in the design of the trial being flawed, rather than the device itself. Kereiakes explains these issues in the video. 

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

 

 

Heart Valve Technology | October 19, 2020

David Cohen, M.D., presents late-breaking data from the STS/ACC Transcatheter Valve Registry (TVT) showing the impact of using cerebral embolic protection devices during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). This is the press conference presentation followed by an expert panel discussion at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting.

The stroke rates were initially high in TAVR compared to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), but these rates have decreased in recent years as operators become more proficient during the procedures and the stroke rates are now comparable or lower than SAVR.

Cerebral embolic protection devices were developed to prevent emboli knocked off the aortic walls and from the aortic valve from traveling to the brain. However, this review of embolic protection device performance and use showed 66 percent of the 700 sites in the TVT Registry report not using these devices.

The rate of in-hospital stroke in the embolic protection group of patients was 1.39 percent. The rate of stroke in patients without embolic protection was 1.54 percent. There was no difference inn the rates of death, stroke, major bleeding or device success between these two groups, Cohen said.

The study also included a propensity-weighted analysis where the embolic group has a stroke rate of 1.3 percent and the no protection device group at 1.58 percent. 

Cohen said there was not a significant reduction in in-hospital or 30-day stroke rates. While there its a slight signal toward fewer strokes with embolic protection, he said the findings show clinical equipoise and provide strong rational for ongoing, large-scale randomized, controlled trials to see if embolic protection devices offer meaningful clinical benefit.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

Related TAVR Content:

VIDEO: Tracking Transcatheter Valve Outcomes in the STS-ACC TVT Registry — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

Key TAVR Takeaways From ACC 2020

U.S. TAVR Outcomes Need Improvement Based on TVT Registry Analysis

FDA Approves TAVR for Low-risk Patients Creates A Paradigm Shift in Cardiology

 

Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies | October 19, 2020

Roxana Mehran, M.D., and Marco Valgimiggle, M.D., present the results of the Xience 90/28 trials that evaluated the use of shortened 3-month and 1-month dual-antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) in high-risk bleeding patients. This is the press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting. It is followed by an expert panel discussion on the merits and meaning of the results.

The use of short duration DAPT has been a big topic of discussion at TCT the past few years. The first FDA cleared indication for shortened DAPT was was granted in late September 2020 for the Medtronic Endeavor stent. The data from these two trials will likely lead the Xience to a similar FDA indication expansion. 

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

 

Heart Valve Technology | October 19, 2020

Doctor Hans-Josef Feistritzerm, Heart Center of Leipzig, Germany, presents data on the use of general vs. local anesthesia in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) from the late-breaking SOLVE-TAVI one-year outcomes trial. This is the press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting. It is followed by an expert panel discussion on the merits and meaning of the results.

The results showed both approaches are safe to use and the outcomes are good.

The trial randomized patients to either self-expandable or balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) valves and the procedures used either general or local anesthesia. TAVR centers have been moving toward the procedure becoming a same day surgery to reduce overnight admissions and send them home as an out patient procedure. This can be accomplished using a local anesthesia if transesophageal echo (TEE) is not needed. However, many still use TEE or there are other factors that make this approach more appealing. Local anesthesia generally has a faster recovery time and reduces  potential complications in sicker and older patients.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

Related TAVR Content:

VIDEO: Tracking Transcatheter Valve Outcomes in the STS-ACC TVT Registry — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

Key TAVR Takeaways From ACC 2020

U.S. TAVR Outcomes Need Improvement Based on TVT Registry Analysis

FDA Approves TAVR for Low-risk Patients Creates A Paradigm Shift in Cardiology

 

Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies | October 17, 2020

Gregg Stone, M.D., presents the results of a pooled analysis of randomized trials of bivalirudin virus heparin in acute myocardial infarction patients in a press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting.

The study looked at periprocedural anticoagulation during percutaneous corona intervention in AMI patients. There has been conflicting results reported between several trials looking at which drug is best for anticoagulation during cath procedures.

This study pooled data from 8 studies that included more than 27,000 patients. The data included both STEMI and NSTEMI patients.

The pool analysis found STEMI patients, bivalirudin was associated with reductions mortality, serious bleeding and NACE events, despite higher rates of myocardial infarction  (MI) and stent thrombosis compared with heparin. The mortality benefit of bivalirudin was pronounced in patients with a post-PCI bivalirudin infusion to mitigate MI and stent thrombosis risks. 

In NSTEMI patients, bivalirudin was associated with a reduction in 30 day serious bleeding events, but similar rates of mortality, MI and stent thrombosis compared to heparin.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

Cath Lab | October 17, 2020

Gregg Stone, M.D., presents the results of the PROSPECT ABSORB Trial in a press conference at the 2020 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Connect virtual meeting. 

The PROSPECT ABSORB Trial was a randomized evaluation of vulnerable plaques using the Abbott Absorb fully bioresorbable stent. The hypothesis of the trial  was to treat lesions prior to plaque ruptured to avoid heart attacks, rather than treating them after plaque rupture when a potential infarct and permanent heart damage is caused. Patients were randomized to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using an Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) stents vs. guideline directed medical therapy (GDMT).

This is the first study that proactively identifies and preemptively treats vulnerable plaques. 

Lesion related MACE events 4 years showed medical therapy alone resulted in 10.7 percent events and the BVS treat patients were 4.3 percent. Stone said the favorable BVS MACE rates warrants a larger, adequately powered randomized trial to determine if PCI treatment of focal vulnerable plaques improves patient outcomes.

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

Heart Failure | October 16, 2020

The late-breaking MitraBridge Study was presented at Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2020 meeting showed the transcatheter MitraClip mitral leaflet repair system can be used as bridge therapy to heart transplantation. About 25 percent of patients in this study were actually taken off the transplant list because they became asymptomatic.[1] 

This is the press conference for the study presented by Cosmo Godino, M.D., an interventional cardiologist from San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy. It is followed by a discussion by several well-known interventional cardiologists and structural heart experts.

The MitraBridge Study showed the transcatheter MitraClip mitral leaflet repair system can be used as bridge therapy for patients on the heart transplant list. It was used to reduce the amount of mitral regurgitation to help ease symptoms in advanced heart failure who need a need a heart transplant, but may have to wait long periods before a heart becomes available.  

The 119-patient study found it not only helped improve patient symptoms for the majority of patients, but 23.5 percent of patients in this study improved so much they were actually taken off the transplant. 

There is a large and growing imbalance between the demand and supply of donor hearts, Godino explained. With the expansion of waiting lists and prolonged waitings times are generally more than a year and it becomes difficult to manage these patients, resulting in a one-year mortality rate of 15 percent. 

Patients selected for MitraClip had advanced/end stage heart failure and concomitant, severe mitral regurgitation with a median left ventricular ejection fraction of 26%. These patients make up between 1 to 10% of the overall heart failure population, Godino said.

There was an 87.5% procedural success rate and no deaths at 30-day. Two thirds of patients remained free of development of composite adverse events at one-year. Of those that improved, 15.5% become eligible for a heart transplant. nearly a quarter could be removed from the list for HTx due to clinical improvement
 

Find additional TCT 2020 news, video and late-breaking studies

 

Reference:

1. Cosmo Godino, Andrea Munafò, Andrea Scotti, et al. MitraClip in secondary mitral regurgitation as a bridge to heart transplantation: 1-year outcomes from the International MitraBridge Registry. The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published September 16, 2020. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healun.2020.09.005.

 

Cath Lab | October 16, 2020

This is an example pf the Shockwave Medical Intravascular Lithotripsy (IVL) catheter system designed to break up heavily calcified plaque in coronary and periperal vessels. The system uses sonic waves that penetrate the vessel wall and crack the calcium without causing vessel trauma, which commonly occures with atherectomy and high pressure balloon angioplasty.  

This demonstration was on the exhibit floor of the 2019 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) annual meeting. The material used in the demonstration are gypsym beads.

 

Related Content on Intervascular Lithotripsy:

Shockwave Technology to Sonically Bust Calcified Coronary Lesions Shows Safety and Efficacy in U.S. Pivotal IDE Trial

FDA Grants Shockwave Medical Breakthrough Status for Coronary Intravascular Lithotripsy

Intravascular Lithotripsy: Will This New Investigational Technology Crack Calcium’s Code in the U.S.? — by Dean Kereiakes, M.D.

Intravascular Lithotripsy May Offer Solution for Calcified Coronary Lesions — By Azeem Latib, M.D.

VIDEO: Breaking Up Calcified Lesions Without Vessel Trauma — Interview with Todd Brinton, M.D.

Shockwave Launches Coronary Intravascular Lithotripsy in Europe

Lithotripsy Safe and Effective in Calcified Stenotic Peripheral Arteries

Shockwave Initiates U.S. Pivotal Study for Coronary Intravascular Lithotripsy

Radial Access | October 07, 2020

Jordan G. Safirstein, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of transradial catheterization for Atlantic Health System’s Morristown Medical Center, Morristown, N.J., explains the new radial access lounge at the Gagnon Cardiovascular Institute.

Transradial access lounges are specifically designed to meet the needs of cardiac catheterization patients who have had their procedure performed through a catheter inserted into their radial artery in the wrist, also known as transradial catheterization. This procedure, which has a shorter recovery period and less bleeding risk than traditional cardiac catheterizations done through the femoral (groin) artery, is now an option for many patients who are catheterized in order to conduct a diagnostic angiogram or have an angioplasty or stent procedure. 

Patients can walk around, use the washroom, get coffee and sit in lounge chairs for their recovery while being monitored via wireless telemetry. This is a stark contrast to the transfemoral artery access recovery, which requires six hours of bed rest and can be very uncomfortable for the patient.

“Nearly half of all cardiac catheterizations are now done transradially, and there is plenty of data to show it is very safe and can be done as an outpatient procedure” Safirstein explained. “We saw the need for a recovery area for these patients that was more comfortable.  These patients don’t need a traditional recovery room. Our goal is to safely send patients home on the same day of their procedure but while they spend time with us, it should be time spent relaxing, reading, receiving education about their procedure and prevention of future events. If they need new medications, we can provide that to them before they leave.”

Read more about the lounge in the article Atlantic Health Morristown Medical Center Opens Radial Lounge for Post-procedure Recovery.

 

Related Transradial Access Content:

VIDEO: Tour of a Radial Access Recovery Lounge That Mimics Cafe Atmosphere — Interview with Jack P. Chen, M.D.

VIDEO: The Benefits of Transradial Access — Interview with Jack P. Chen, M.D.

Radial Access Recovery Lounge Mimics Cafe Atmosphere

VIDEO: History of Radial Artery Access - an interview with Ferdinand Kiemeneij, M.D.

 

VIDEO: Radial Access Lounge Walk Through at Morristown Medical Center

Radial Access, Same-Day Cardiac Procedure Could Save $300 Million Annually

VIDEO: Update on U.S. Transradial Access Adoption — an interview with Sunil Rao, M.D.

VIDEO: Trends in Radial Access for Percutaneous Coronary Interventions — Interview with Sunil Rao, M.D., and Prashant Kaul, M.D.

 

Transradial Access Celebrates 25 Years

Find more radial access news and video

 

Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) Occluders | October 02, 2020

Horst Sievert, M.D., is the director of the Cardiovascular Center Frankfurt, and associate professor of internal medicine-cardiology at the University of Frankfurt. He discusses left atrial appendage (LAA) device advances and new developments for more effective LAA closure to reduce the stroke risk in atrial fibrillation (AFib or AF) patients and new developments for more effective LAA closure to reduce the stroke risk in atrial fibrillation (AFib or AF) patients.

He said there are current limitations using the Boston Scientific Watchman FLX and Abbott Amplatzer Amulet devices. One of the new concepts in transcatheter LAA occlusion technology from Append Medical is a suture delivery system that eliminate permanent metal implants and mimics a surgical suture closure without the need for an open chest procedure.

Sievert has more than 30 years experience in cardiology and has been the principal investigator in a number of clinical trials and has authored more than 130 manuscripts and 500 abstracts in peer-reviewed journals and 50 books and book contributions. He is also chairman of Scientific Advisory for Append Medical, developer of a novel LAA closure device.

Read more about the Append device — First-Of-Its-Kind, No-Implant LAA Occluder Noted for Innovation at 2019 ICI Meeting
 

Find more LAA occluder technology news

 

Artificial Intelligence | September 21, 2020

Nick West, M.D., chief medical officer for Abbott, explains the details from a survey of 1,400 patients, physicians and healthcare executives in an effort to understand the needs to guide future technology development. Artificial intelligence (AI) is being looked at as a way to better personalize medicine. In the cath lab, AI might be used to help interpret intravascular images as a second set of eyes for the physician. AI also might enable immediate feedback on how to proceed with a case based on current guidelines and clinical evidence.

Read more about the survey in the article "Emerging Technology and Data Key to Closing Treatment Gaps to Improve Cardiovascular Care."

See Part 1 of this video where west describes the key findings of the survey in the VIDEO: Survey Shows Large Disconnect in Medical Technology Across Continuum of Care.

 

 

Structural Heart | September 16, 2020

Juan F. Granada, M.D., CEO of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) explains structural heart innovations and new technologies have exploded in the past few years after the success of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVR) with the MitraClip. 

Granada said device technologies in development for interventional heart failure therapies, mitral valve and tricuspid replacements and repairs have grown rapidly in just the past couple years. He said the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapies (TCT) 2020 received a very large number of presentation proposals for new structural heart innovations.

Hear more about the TCT 2020 virtual meeting in the VIDEO: What to Expect at the Virtual TCT 2020 Meeting, an interview with Juan Granada.

 

 

 

Cardiovascular Business | September 14, 2020

Nick West, M.D., chief medical officer for Abbott, explains the details from a survey of 1,400 patients, physicians and healthcare executives in an effort to understand the high-level issues regarding the use of technology in medicine, the gaps in communication, and patient perceptions to guide future technology development. 

Four high-level observations emerged from our study:

1. Patients are frustrated by the level of care they’re receiving – they understandably want a personalized healthcare experience “tailored for me,” across the care continuum.

2. Physicians lament the lack of time they have to spend with patients, their limited visibility into patient adherence to treatment and lifestyle changes, and challenges with other key factors that influence the quality of care they can provide.

3. Administrators are pressured to deliver patient satisfaction and reduce costs across multiple departments.

4. Diagnostic and data-driven technology holds the promise to move care from a point-in-time, intervention-only focus to a more holistic “whole patient” view by improving the accuracy of
diagnosis, appropriate interventions as required, and evidence-based post-procedural care.

Read more about the survey in the article "Emerging Technology and Data Key to Closing Treatment Gaps to Improve Cardiovascular Care."

See Part 2 of this video where West describes the how AI might be used in interventional cardiology in the VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Improve Cath Lab Interventions.

Radial Access | September 11, 2020

Atlantic Health System’s Morristown Medical Center has opened one of the region’s first radial lounges in its Gagnon Cardiovascular Institute. Radial access lounges are specifically designed to meet the needs of cardiac catheterization patients who have had their procedure performed through a catheter inserted into their radial artery in the wrist, also known as transradial catheterization. This procedure, which has a shorter recovery period and less bleeding risk than traditional cardiac catheterizations done through the femoral (groin) artery, is now an option for many patients who are catheterized in order to conduct a diagnostic angiogram or have an angioplasty or stent procedure. 

Unlike traditional recovery areas for femoral access that require constant compression of the groin for several hours and requires the patient not to move from the bed, radial patients in the lounge sit is recliners and can use the washroom and get coffee and snacks and are able to walk around with just a compression wrist band. lounges like this are being used at several centers for same-day percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures, eliminating overnight stays and helping to reduce healthcare costs.

Read more about the lounge in the article Atlantic Health Morristown Medical Center Opens Radial Lounge for Post-procedure Recovery.

 

Related Transradial Access Content:

VIDEO: Tour of a Radial Access Recovery Lounge That Mimics Cafe Atmosphere — Interview with Jack P. Chen, M.D.

VIDEO: The Benefits of Transradial Access — Interview with Jack P. Chen, M.D.

Radial Access Recovery Lounge Mimics Cafe Atmosphere

VIDEO: History of Radial Artery Access - an interview with Ferdinand Kiemeneij, M.D.

 

Radial Access Adoption in the United States

VIDEO: New Frontiers in Radial Access — an interview with Mladen I. Vidovich, M.D.

Radial Access, Same-Day Cardiac Procedure Could Save $300 Million Annually

VIDEO: Update on U.S. Transradial Access Adoption — an interview with Sunil Rao, M.D.

 

VIDEO: Trends in Radial Access for Percutaneous Coronary Interventions — Interview with Sunil Rao, M.D., and Prashant Kaul, M.D.

Transradial Access Celebrates 25 Years

Drug-Eluting Balloons | September 09, 2020

Juan F. Granada, M.D., CEO of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) worked on preclinical development work for a couple drug-eluting balloons (DEBs) and offers an overview on the technology. 

Granada also sheds some light on the biggest question regarding drug-coated balloons (DCBs) with the 2019 U.S. Food and Drug Administration warning that the devices might cause higher mortality, based on a December 2018 meta-analysis of trial data that showed an increased mortality signal. This was a big topic of discussion at TCT 2019 and again at SCAI in 2020 and more recent study data has shown there is no safety issue. 

The basic DCB technology is also discussed by Granada, who explains how the excipients used to carry to anti-proliferative drug on the balloon surface and the crystalline structure of the drug are key differentiators. He said these two elements are key in how much drug is delivered and the duration of its elution in the vessel wall.
 

Related Drug-eluting Balloon Content:

Recent Developments in Drug-Coated Balloons

Comparison Chart of Drug-eluting Balloons (requires login but is free to signup)

Positive Data for the Ranger Drug-coated Balloon and Eluvia Vascular Stent

LEVANT Trial Data Shows Safety of Drug-Coated Balloon Shown

Drug-coated Balloon Maintains Good Outcomes in 4-Year IN.PACT Global Study Data

No Difference Between Drug-coated Balloons and Plain Balloons After Laser Atherectomy

Philips Shares Three-Year Results for Stellarex .035 Drug-Coated Balloon

VIDEO: SCAI Prospective on Key Takeaways at TCT 2019 — Interview with Chandan Devireddy, M.D., including discussion of the LEVANT study results

Cardiac Imaging | August 12, 2020

Advanced visualization company Medis recently purchased Advanced Medical Imaging Development S.r.l. (AMID), which developed software to automatically track and measure strain in echocardiograms. That technology is now being adapted for strain imaging in CT and MRI. Using this imaging data, the software also can noninvasively derive pressure gradient loops and curves, similar to using invasive pulmonary arterial (PA) hemodynamic pressure catheters. This information is useful in monitoring critically ill patients on hemodynamic support and to monitor worsening severity of heart failure. 

The technology was discussed at the 2020 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) virtual meeting. Examples of this technology are presented in this video. 
 

Find more news and video from SCCT 2020

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography
 

TCT | August 01, 2020

With COVID-19 forcing all medical conferences to go virtual in 2020, Juan F. Granada, M.D., CEO of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) explains how this year's Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2020 meeting is being structured and some of the advantages of the virtual format. He also shares how the virtual format was actually very helpful at CRF's Transcatheter Valve Therapeutics (TVT) Structural Heart Summit earlier this summer.

Virtual cardiology meetings so far in 2020 have found the format enables much more participation by international physicians than in the past. TCT is using this idea to focus sessions aimed at Asia and Europe at different parts that correspond to the end of the work day in those parts of the world. Granada said U.S. focused sessions will take place toward the end of the day across the United States to accommodate more attendees during the sessions, since many will be attending after they are finished for the day, rather than take days off to attend.

Virtual Cardiology Meetings During COVID-19 Allowing More International Attendance

VIDEO: Insights Into How HRS Organized its Virtual Meeting — a discussion with Krahn after the HRS 2020 virtual meeting on lessons learned.

Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) Occluders | July 24, 2020

Devi G. Nair, M.D., FHRS, director of cardiac electrophysiology, St. Bernards Heart and Vascular Center, Jonesboro, Ark., was an investigator in the PINNACLE FLX clinical trial for the Boston Scientific Watchman FLX left atrial appendage (LAA) occluder device. 

The newest iteration of the Watchman was cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 2020. Read more about the Watchman FLX 

The transcatheter implant is used in close the LAA, a pouch that forms part of the left atrium. The LAA is implicated in the formation of blood clots that cause stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The Watchman FLX is indicated to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with non-valvular AF (NVAF) who need an alternative to oral anticoagulation therapy by permanently closing off the left atrial appendage.

Nair is currently involved with another trial of the Watchman FLX, OPTION FLX trial, which is examining the use of LAA occlusion in post-ablation patients.

Nair is also chairman for the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) member engagement sub-committee and is a board member of the Arkansas chapter of the American College of Cardiology (ACC).
 

Watch Nair in this interview — VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on Electrophysiology Programs

 

Cardiogenic Shock | July 15, 2020

Navin Kapur, M.D., FAHA, FACC, FSCAI, director, Acute Mechanical Circulatory Support Program and executive director of The Cardiovascular Center for Research and Innovation (CVCRI), Tufts Medical Center, explains the research being done by the Cardiogenic Shock Working Group, which is headed by Tufts. 

The Cardiogenic Shock Working Group (CSWG) has created a patient registry now includes 15-20 centers in the United States and data on more than 2,000 patients who suffered shock either from heart failure or acute myocardial infarction (MI). It also includes hemodynamic data on more than 1,100 patients. It also includes all types of mechanical circulatory support devices, from intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP),  incrementally higher levels with a percutaneous Impella pump, TandemHeart, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).

Research last year showed three types of phenotype profiles in cardiogenic shock patients, including non-congested, cardio-renal and cardio-renal-hepatic. Kapur also said there is evidence that there is venous involvement that needs to be considered in future research.

The large amount of variables in the patient data from the CSWG is partly examined by artificial intelligence (AI), which helped identify the three shock phenotype profiles.

 

 

Related Cardiogenic Shock and Hemodyanmic Support Content:

VIDEO: Door-to-Unloading (DTU) Trial May Change STEMI Care

VIDEO: Tufts Uses a Hemodynamic Support Algorithm to Determine What Devices to Use

VIDEO: Hemodynamic Support Protocols at Henry Ford Hospital

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Initiative Continues to Reduce Mortality by 50 Percent

 

VIDEO: How to Reduce Cardiogenic Shock Mortality by 50 Percent

SCAI Releases New Consensus Document on Classification Stages of Cardiogenic Shock

Cardiogenic Shock Survival Rates Improve in Three Years Since Impella FDA Approval

VIDEO: The Importance of Ventricular Unloading in AMI and Cardiogenic Shock

 

VIDEO: Escalation of Support and Algorithms for Cardiogenic Shock

10 Reasons Why it is Time to Learn More About Cardiogenic Shock

New Approaches to Reduce Cardiogenic Shock Mortality

 

Find more content on Tufts Medical Center 

 

Cath Lab | July 15, 2020

Richard Botto, CVT, RCSA, chief cardiovascular technologist, division of cardiology, cardiac cath lab, offers an overview of the interventional catheterization laboratories at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. 

Botto also explains the latest hybrid cath lab completed in 2018. The state-of-the-art Cath Lab Room 3, licensed as a hybrid operating room, is used by Tufts interventionalists and surgeons to perform some of the most advanced therapeutic procedures, including transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), MitraClip mitral valve leaflet repairs and acute mechanical circulatory support procedures. Two babies also were delivered in this room due to extremely high-risk pregnancies. Tufts is the only facility in Boston to have a fully-functional operating room geographically located within the cardiac catheterization laboratory. 
 

Additional Videos From Tufts Medical Center:

VIDEO: Tufts Uses a Hemodynamic Support Algorithm to Determine What Devices to Use

VIDEO: Overview of the Structural Heart Program at Tufts Medical Center

VIDEO: Tufts Medical Center Spearheads Innovation With its Preclinical Cath Lab

VIDEO: Developing a Heart Failure Care Team

VIDEO: Overview of the TAVR Program at Tufts Medical Center

Additional videos and articles on Tufts Medical Center Channel

 

 

Cath Lab | July 13, 2020

The Vieussens’ arterial ring (VAR) is a connection between the conus artery and the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery’s proximal right ventricular branch. VAR is present in about 48 percent of the population as an embryonic conotruncal ring remnant. This ring can be exploited as an alternative coronary artery revascularization route in patients where this anatomy is present. Guidewires can be navigated from the right coronary artery through the conus to the LAD.

Jay Mohan, D.O., RPVI, interventional cardiology fellow at William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, created this video to briefly explain the use of the Vieussens’ arterial ring in interventional cardiology.  

Mohan is board certified in cardiology, internal medicine, echocardiography and nuclear cardiology. He also serves as vice president of the Dr. Ramesh Kumar Foundation

Mohan shares regular updates on Twitter about recent cardiology technology devices, takeaway points from conferences and short educational videos he produces. Follow or contact him via Twitter or Instagram at @cardiologyoncall.

 

Related Cardiovascular Educational Videos Created by Jay Mohan, D.O.:

VIDEO: The Latest Data on COVID-19 and Cardiovascular Disease

VIDEO: Creating a Home COVID-19 Decontamination Area for the Clinician

 

Hemodynamic Support Devices | June 05, 2020

This is a quick animation demonstrating how the new 9 French Abiomed Impella ECP expands to approximately 18 French and provides peak flows of 3.5 L/min. The device was approved for a U.S. FDA investigational device exemption (IDE) first-in-human trial in June 2020. Read more on the IDE. It uses a collapsible cannula instead of the fix size cannula used on the current generation of Impella devices. The design addresses issues with needing large bore vascular access and associated bleeding complications.

The Impella series of hemodynamic support devices from Abiomed are percutaneously delivered, catheter-based heart pumps that offer temporary ventricular assist support.  

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Demonstration of the Impella Percutaneous Hemodynamic Support Device

VIDEO: Door-to-Unloading (DTU) Trial May Change STEMI Care — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Hemodynamic Support Protocols at Henry Ford Hospital — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: Tufts Uses a Hemodynamic Support Algorithm to Determine What Devices to Use — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

Photo Gallery of the Abiomed Impella Production Line

VIDEO: Justification for Hemodynamic Support in Complex PCI — Interview with Jeffrey J. Popma, M.D.

VIDEO: How to Reduce Cardiogenic Shock Mortality by 50 Percent — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Importance of Ventricular Unloading in AMI and Cardiogenic Shock — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.

 

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 29, 2020

Jay Mohan, D.O., RPVI, interventional cardiology fellow at William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, created this video. It shows other clinicians how he set up his home COVID-19 decontamination area where he changes clothes, shoes and sterilizes before entering his house in order to protect his family. He has been involved with direct care of COVID-19 patients the past two months.

Since the start of the SAR-CoV-2 pandemic, clinicians and first-responders who are in contact with, or possible contact with, COVID-19 patients have developed ways to not bring and viral contamination home with them. This often includes on transition spot in the garage or designed room where they can change out of work clothing and shoes and into new clothing and shoes. Shoes and coats are separated into ones used for home and those dedicated for use at work only. Those who wear and reuse N95 masks also have developed ways to take the mask off by the straps only so they do not touch it and strapping it over a tupperware container that can then be sealed, or stored inside a disposable paper or plastic bag.

Mohan is board certified in cardiology, internal medicine, echocardiography and nuclear cardiology. He also serves as vice president of the Dr. Ramesh Kumar Foundation

Mohan shares regular updates on Twitter about recent cardiology technology devices, takeaway points from conferences and short educational videos he produces. Follow or contact him via Twitter or Instagram at @cardiologyoncall.

Watch a video animation he created — VIDEO: The Latest Data on COVID-19 and Cardiovascular Disease.
 

Find more cardiovascular related COVID-19 content

HRS | May 22, 2020

Interview with Andrew D. Krahn, M.D., FHRS, head of the division of cardiology at St. Paul’s Hospital, and professor of medicine at the University of British Columbia. He is also vice president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). He moderated the late-breaking sessions at 2020 HRS virtual meeting and explains the highlights of the new technologies and data presented. 

Technologies include a nasal spray to stop supraventricular tachycardia, pulsed field ablation technology that may offer improvement over current technology, subcutaneous ICD (S-ICD) technology performing as well as traditional transvenous lead ICDs, contact force sensing ablation improves outcomes, use of smart watches to help atrial fibrillation patients adhere to oral anticoagulation therapy, and the first pacemaker to interface with the patient's smart phone.

Watch another interview with Krahn in the VIDEO: Insights Into How HRS Organized its Virtual Meeting.

Find a complete list of the Heart Rhythm 2020 meeting late-breaking studies with links to articles on each.

Find more news and video from the Heart Rhythm Society.
 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 01, 2020

Thomas Maddox, M.D., MSc, FACC, the chair of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Science and Quality Committee, explains concerns by ACC in a large drop in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) heart attacks and strokes since the U.S. spread of COVID-19. Maddox is also the executive director of the Healthcare Innovation Lab of BJC Healthcare and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. He is also an assistant professor of cardiology at Washington University.

The ACC is concerned about the 35-40 percent drop in STEMI and stroke patients presenting to emergency rooms across the U.S. and internationally since the start of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. Maddox is alarmed by the drop in cases and suspects patients are deciding to stay home rather than go to the hospitals out of fear about catching COVID-19. ACC launched a public relations campaign April 14, 2020, aimed at the public to get them to call 911 or go to hospitals if they have symptoms of stoke of a heart attack. Maddox said hospitals are still seeing and treating non-COVID-19 patients and the cardiovascular departments are still activating their cath labs to handle and acute cardiac cases that come in. 

He said Spain, which was hit earlier than the U.S. by the virus, saw a STEMI case decrease of about 40 percent. Based on limited U.S. data, he said U.S. cath lab activations are down about 35 percent. A clearer picture of the actual numbers of STEMI and other PCI cases will not be known from the ACC National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) until later this year, since most hospitals pull this data quarterly.

ACC is offering resources for the public  at www.cardiosmart.org/Coronavirus to evaluate their symptoms and help decide it they should go to the hospital or call 911.

Read the related article "Rapid Drop in Heart Attacks and Stroke at Hospitals Concerns ACC."

Watch another interview with Maddox in the VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19.

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 22, 2020

Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D., FSCAI, president of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) and chief, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at UC San Diego Medical Center, explains the SCAI precaution guidelines for treating patients in the cath lab under the COVID-19 pandemic.

He explains the how cardiology departments in the U.S. are operating to treat acute patients during novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) containment efforts. 

The guidelines are outlined in the document "Considerations for Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory Procedures During the COVID‐19 Pandemic" can be accessed online in the SCAI journal Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions.[1]

 

Other Impact of COVID-19 on Cardiology Content:

How to Manage AMI Patients During the COVID-19 Pandemic

VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on the Interventional Cardiology Program at Henry Ford Hospital — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: 9 Cardiologists Share COVID-19 Takeaways From Across the U.S.

VIDEO: Multiple Cardiovascular Presentations of COVID-19 in New York — Interview with Justin Fried, M.D.

Image Gallery Showing Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic

ACC COVID-19 Clinical Guidance For the Cardiovascular Care Team

VIDEO: COVID-19 Precautions for Cardiac Imaging — Interview with Stephen Bloom, M.D.

Rapid Drop in Heart Attacks and Stroke at Hospitals Concerns ACC 

VIDEO: Cancelling Non-essential Cardiac Procedures During the COVID-19 Outbreak — an interview with SCCT President Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D.

VIDEO: Telemedicine in Cardiology and Medical Imaging During COVID-19 — Interview with Regina Druz, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

Reference:

1. Molly Szerlip  Saif Anwaruddin  Herbert D. Aronow, et al. Considerations for Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory Procedures During the COVID‐19 Pandemic Perspectives from the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Emerging Leader Mentorship (SCAI ELM) Members and Graduates. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions. First published:25 March 2020. https://doi.org/10.1002/ccd.28887.

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 17, 2020

DAIC Editor Dave Fornell has conducted numerous video interviews remotely from his home office in March and April 2020 with nine cardiologists from around the United States. After each interview he asked how COVID-19 has impacted their hospital and them personally. This video offers a candid overview of their thoughts in the fight against the novel coronavirus.

Each was interviewed for other videos and some of the comments used here were from a questions after the main interview on how novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) is impacting them, their patients or their cardiology departments. 

Insights include the following doctors. Click on the names to see their videos from March and April 2020:

   • Thomas Maddox, M.D., Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis
   • Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D., UC San Diego Medical Center
   • William O’Neill, M.D., Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit
   • Regina Druz, M.D., Integrative Cardiology Center of Long Island, N.Y.
   • Justin Fried, M.D., Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York City
   • Hicham Skali, M.D., Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston
   • Stephen Bloom, M.D., FASNC, Midwest Heart and Vascular Associates, Overland Park, Kansas
   • Michael Mack, M.D., Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas
   • Basel Ramlawi, M.D, Heart and Vascular Center at Valley Health System in Virginia

Find more videos and news on the impact of COVID-19 on cardiology

 

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 14, 2020

Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D., FSCAI, president of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) and chief, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at UC San Diego Medical Center, explains the new American College of Cardiology (ACC) and SCAI precaution guidelines for treating transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) patients in the cath lab during the COVID-19 pandemic.

He explains recommendations for how structural heart programs can continue to treat acutely ill patients during novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) containment efforts. The key message in the guidelines is to defer patients who can wait until containemnt efforts loosen in the coming months, while acute patients who are very sick should be treated.

The guidelines are outlined in the document "Triage Considerations for Patients Referred for Structural Heart Disease Intervention During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID‐19) Pandemic: An ACC /SCAI Consensus Statement." can be accessed online in the SCAI journal Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions.[1]

 

Related COVID-19 Cardiology Content:

VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on the Cardiovascular Program at Henry Ford Hospital — Interview with William O’Neill, M.D.

First Large-scale U.S. Study on Hydroxychloroquine COVID-19 Prophylaxis Begins in Detroit

New York City Physicians Note Multiple Cardiovascular Presentations of COVID-19

VIDEO: Cancelling Non-essential Cardiac Procedures During the COVID-19 Outbreak — Interview with Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D.

ACC COVID-19 recommendations for the cardiovascular care team

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

AHA, ACC, HRS Caution Use of COVID-19 Therapies Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin in Cardiac Patients

FDA Approves ECMO to Treat COVID-19 Patients

COVID-19 STEMI Registry Created to Study Acute Cardiovascular Effects of the Virus

Image Gallery Showing Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic

VIDEO: Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

 

 

Reference:

1. Pinak B. Shah, Frederick G.P. Welt, Ehtisham Mahmud, et al. Triage Considerations for Patients Referred for Structural Heart Disease Intervention During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID‐19) Pandemic: An ACC /SCAI Consensus Statement. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions. First published:06 April 2020 https://doi.org/10.1002/ccd.28910.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 10, 2020

Detroit, Michigan, has been one the hardest hit regions with a large number of COVID-19 cases. William O’Neill, M.D., medical director of the Center for Structural Heart Disease at Henry Ford Hospital, explains the impact of novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) on the cardiology program and his takeaways on COVID-19 cardiovascular involvement based on cases he has seen.

O'Neill said ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) cases have mysteriously dropped off significantly since quarantines began, a reflection of a nationwide trend. He also said he has not seen a lot of myocarditis or cardiogenic shock COVID-19 patients, except for a small handful. These conditions have been reported elsewhere in COVID-19 patients, but O'Neill said the patients he has seen die of COVID-19 usually have an onset of a cytokine storm, lose vascular integrity and then all their organs fail. He has not seen a primary cardiac component involved in most of the critically ill patients where hemodynamic support would have helped. 

 

Related COVID-19 Cardiology Content:

First Large-scale U.S. Study on Hydroxychloroquine COVID-19 Prophylaxis Begins in Detroit

New York City Physicians Note Multiple Cardiovascular Presentations of COVID-19

AHA, ACC, HRS Caution Use of COVID-19 Therapies Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin in Cardiac Patients

FDA Approves ECMO to Treat COVID-19 Patients

COVID-19 STEMI Registry Created to Study Acute Cardiovascular Effects of the Virus

Image Gallery Showing Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic

VIDEO: Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic

VIDEO: Cancelling Non-essential Cardiac Procedures During the COVID-19 Outbreak — Interview with Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D.

ACC COVID-19 recommendations for the cardiovascular care team

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

 

 

Structural Heart | April 03, 2020

Basel Ramlawi, M.D., chairman of The Heart and Vascular Center at Valley Health System in Virginia, director of the Advanced Valve and Aortic Center, and co-principal investigator for an American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2020 Scientific Session late-breaking trial that looks at the clinical implications of TAVR in patients who have bicuspid aortic valve leaflets offers an overview of the data from ACC.20.

Patients with bicuspid, or two-leaflet, aortic valves who undergo transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures had a high rate of success and low risk of death or disabling stroke at 30 days, according to new data presented at the ACC 2020. The session was part of the virtual, online late-breaking presentations, since the live meeting was cancelled due to the spread of COVID-19. 

TAVR has become increasingly popular in recent years as a less-invasive alternative to open-heart valve replacement surgery. However, few studies have examined its safety in patients with a bicuspid valve, a genetic variation of the aortic valve in some patients, rather than the typic three-leaflet valve. The condition affecting roughly 2-5 percent of people in which two of the three flaps in the aortic valve are fused together.

A bicuspid valve is more likely to become stenosis. Valve replacement, either through TAVR or open-heart surgery, is the main treatment option available for people with severe aortic stenosis, which causes fatigue and other symptoms and raises the risk of other heart problems when left untreated. The new study is the first to prospectively examine TAVR’s safety for treating severe aortic stenosis in relatively young, healthy patients—in whom open-heart surgery would pose a low risk—who have a bicuspid valve. It also is one of the first studies involving such patients in which doctors used a newer self-expanding artificial valve.

“This clearly has clinical implications with patients with bicuspid valves who want TAVR," said Basel Ramlawi, M.D., cardiothoracic surgeon at Valley Health System in Virginia and the study’s co-principal investigator. "TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis is a very viable and safe procedure in low-risk bicuspid patients and achieved excellent early results. Though additional follow-up is necessary to determine long-term outcomes, early results suggest this procedure can be performed successfully in low-risk individuals with a good outcome.” 

The study prospectively tracked 150 patients who underwent TAVR at 25 medical centers in the U.S. 

Read the aricle on the study

 

Find more ACC news and video

 

 

Structural Heart | April 01, 2020

A review of the PARTNER 3 Low-Risk Trial with Michael Mack, M.D., chairman, cardiovascular service line,  Baylor Scott and White Health, Dallas Texas, chairman of the board of the BSW Health Research institute, Dallas, and co-principal investigator of the trial. The PARTNER 3 Low-Risk Trial two-year data were presented as a late-breaking study at the virtual American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2020 annual meeting. The trial offers additional evidence that TAVR performs as well as surgery in select low-risk patients. 

Mack said the trial included patients over the age of 65, and there is still a question about long-term durability of the Sapien 3 TAVR valve used in trial before it is used in younger patients. He said patients in this trial will be tracked out to 10 years, which will offer a lot of information on durability of the current iteration of this valve. In the video, he also elaborates on TAVR issues involved with bicuspid aortic valves and other patient selection issues.

PARTNER 3 enrolled 1,000 patients with severe aortic stenosis and a Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) risk score of less than 4 percent. All patients had a tricuspid aortic valve. Half of the participants were randomly assigned to undergo TAVR and half underwent surgery. At two years, 11.5 percent of patients receiving TAVR and 17.4 percent of those receiving surgery died, suffered a stroke or were rehospitalized for cardiovascular problems, a difference in the composite primary endpoint that researchers reported as showing non-inferiority, meaning neither treatment was superior to the other.

In a secondary analysis, rates of death and stroke were found to be not significantly different between the two groups. Death occurred in 2.4 percent of those receiving TAVR and 3.2 percent of those receiving surgery, while stroke occurred in 2.4 percent of those receiving TAVR and 3.6 percent of those receiving surgery. Rehospitalization rates showed a significant difference in favor of TAVR; 8.5 percent of those receiving TAVR and 12.5 percent of those receiving surgery were rehospitalized for cardiovascular reasons during the study period. 

Read more details about this trial 

Read the one year trial results from ACC 2019

Find other ACC news and videos
 

FFR Technologies | March 26, 2020

James Udelson, M.D., chief of the division of cardiology, Tufts Medical Center, explains how cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans are being used to create image-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR) values to determine if a coronary lesion is flow limiting. The FFR-CT can help determine if the patient needs a stent, or if the disease can be treated with medication. Tufts uses FFR-CT evaluations on non-emergency chest pain patients to reduce the need for diagnostic catheterizations. 

 

Related FFR-CT Content:

Image-based FFR May Replace Pressure Wires and Adenosine

New Technology Directions in Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR)

8 Cardiovascular Technologies to Watch in 2020

VIDEO: Using FFR-CT in Everyday Practice

FFR-CT is Ready for Prime-time Evaluation of Coronary Disease

6 Hot Topics in Interventional Cardiology at TCT 2019

FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?

 

Find more news and video from Tufts Medical Center

 

 

Structural Heart Occluders | March 24, 2020

Interview with Carey Kimmelstiel, M.D., FACP, FACC, director, cardiac catheterization laboratory, director, interventional cardiology, Tufts Medical Center, discusses the patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure program at Tufts.  

Tufts was the lead enrollment site in the Gore and Amplatzer PFO closure device trials. The center works very closely with neurology to select patients who might benefits from PFO closure to help prevent cryptogenic stroke and or migraine headaches. Tufts uses structural heart transcatheter occluders in various anatomical positions and in the left atrial appendage (LAA).

 

Related PFO Closure Content:

VIDEO: How Transcatheter PFO Closure Can Reduce Cryptogenic Stroke — Interview with John Rhodes, M.D.

SCAI Offers Recommendations for Safe Use of PFO Closure Technologies

VIDEO: An Overview of PFO Closure to Treat Cryptogenic Stroke — Interview with Karen Orjuela, M.D.

VIDEO: Demonstration of a Transcatheter PFO Occluder Implantation

VIDEO: Addressing Adult Congenital Heart Referrals — Interview with Ami Bhatt, M.D.

VIDEO: Transcatheter Closure of Holes in the Heart — Interview with Ziyad Hijazi, M.D.
 

Find more videos and content on the Tufts Medical Center

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 20, 2020

An interview with Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D., FSCAI, chief, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, executive director of medicine, Cardiovascular Institute, director of  interventional cardiology and cardiac cath lab at UC San Diego Medical Center, and president of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI). He explains the how cardiology departments in the U.S. are now postponing cardiovascular procedures due to novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) containment efforts and new guidelines from Medicare calling for delay of all elective procedures in the country. 

Mahmud explains how patients are being prioritized, with acute myocardial infarction patients or others with acute, life-threatening conditions, or at high risk for a near term hospital admission, will still receive cardiac catheterizations, cardiovascular surgery or structural heart procedures for MitraClip and transcatheter aortic replacement (TAVR) under certain circumstances. All other procedures are being postponed until further notice based in the spread and infection rates of COVID-19. He said most hospitals, including his own, are moving to telehealth visits via phone or online to continue clinic work with patients, including those with chronic conditions such as heart failure.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced March 18, 2020, that all elective surgeries, and non-essential medical, surgical and dental procedures should be delayed during the coronavirus outbreak. This move is three-fold. 
   1. It is to help with containment efforts by reducing patient and family travel to hospitals, which are at the center of the COVID-19 outbreak. 
   2. Delaying procedures will help preserve and inventory of personal protective equipment (PPE), hospital beds and ventilators and other medical supplies. 
   3. With the start of social distancing and the shut down of all large gatherings, this has severely impacted blood drives and other blood donations, so the nation's blood banks have severely limited supplies.

“The reality is clear and the stakes are high — we need to preserve personal protective equipment for those on the front lines of this fight,” said CMS Administrator Seema Verma.

This will not only preserve equipment but also free up the healthcare workforce to care for the patients who are most in need. Additionally, as states and the nation as a whole work toward limiting the spread of COVID-19, healthcare providers should encourage patients to remain home, unless there is an emergency, to protect others while also limiting their exposure to the virus. 

Read Mahmud's SCAI President's letter The Evolving Pandemic of COVID-19 and Interventional Cardiology

 

Related Cardiology Related COVID-19 Content:

ACC COVID-19 recommendations for the cardiovascular care team

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

ESC Council on Hypertension Says ACE-I and ARBs Do Not Increase COVID-19 Mortality

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS)

CT Provides Best Diagnosis for Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Radiology Lessons for Coronavirus From the SARS and MERS Epidemics

Deployment of Health IT in China’s Fight Against the COVID-19 Epidemic

Emerging Technologies Proving Value in Chinese Coronavirus Fight

Radiologists Describe Coronavirus CT Imaging Features

Coronavirus Update from the FDA

CT Imaging of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia

CT Imaging Features of 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Chest CT Findings of Patients Infected With Novel Coronavirus 2019-nCoV Pneumonia 

 

Additional COVID-19 Resources for Clinicians:

   ACC COVID-19 Hub page   

   Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center with inteavtive map of cases in U.S. and worldwide 

   World Health Organization (WHO) COVID-19 situation reports

   World Health Organization (WHO) coronavirus information page

   U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) COVID-19 information page

   Centers for Disease Control (CDC) COVID-19 information page

   Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) frequently asked questions and answers (FAQs) for healthcare providers regarding COVID-19 related payments
 

 

Heart Failure | March 13, 2020

Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D., FAHA, FACC, FSCAI, executive director, The CardioVascular Center for Research and Innovation (CVCRI), and director of Cardiac Biology Research Center, Molecular Cardiology Research Institute (MCRI), Tufts Medical Center, Boston. He explains how temporary occlusion of the superior vena cava (SVC) appears to help reset the heart to normal function in heart failure patients. Kapur is currently involved in a trial using the PreCardia device pioneered at Tufts Medical Center.

Read more about the first late-breaking presentation of this technology at SCAI 2019 — Novel Therapeutic Approach Effective at Reducing Pressure for Heart Failure Patients
 

Find more videos and content on the Tufts Medical Center