Videos | Cardiogenic Shock | November 16, 2021

VIDEO: Updates Made to the SCAI Cardiogenic Shock Classifications

Recent Videos View all 626 items

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 18, 2022

Orlando Simonetti, Ph.D., professor, cardiovascular medicine, worked with Siemens to help develop a new, lower-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, the Magnetom Free.Max. It can scan patients that previously may have been contraindicated because of implantable medical devices. The first system installed in the U.S. is at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. It has a much lower magnetic field and a larger patient opening, removing barriers to MRI imaging for many patients.

Simonetti and his colleagues developed new techniques to boost the signal-to-noise ratio in MRI machines, which allowed the creation of a machine with a lower magnetic field strength that still enables high quality images.

The system gained FDA clearance in July 2021 and was featured by Siemens at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 meeting.

The interview and footage was provided by The Ohio University State University Wexner Medical Center.

Read more in the article New FDA-approved MRI Expands Access to Life-saving Imaging.

 

Artificial Intelligence | January 13, 2022

Here are two examples of artificial intelligence (AI) driven pulmonary embolism (PE) response team apps featured by vendors Aidoc and Viz.AI at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 meeting.

The AI scans computed tomography (CT) image datasets as they came off the imaging system and looked for evidence of PE. If detected by the algorithm, it immediately sends an alert to the stroke care team members via smartphone messaging. This is done before the images are even loaded into the PACS. The radiologist on the team can use a link on the app to open the CT dataset and has basic tools for scrolling, windowing and leveling to determine if there is a PE and the severity. The team can then use the app to send messages, access patient information, imaging and reports. This enabled them all to be on the same page and can communicate quickly via mobile devices, rather than being required to use dedicated workstations in the hospital. 

Both vendors showed similar apps for stroke at RSNA 2019. That idea for rapid alerts, diagnosis and communications for acute care teams has now expanded to PE and also for aortic dissection and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). AI.Viz and Aidoc are looking at expanding this type of technology for other acute care team rolls, including heart failure response. 

Read more about this technology in the article AI Can Facilitate Automated Activation of Pulmonary Embolism Response Teams.

Find more AI news

Find more RSNA news and video

 

 

Cath Lab | January 13, 2022

Advancements in analytics and data visualizations are helping to streamline operations and improve productivity at cath labs across the country. Kootenai Health in Coeur d'Alene Idaho has a single cath lab performing more than 2,000 cases per year. Diane Penkert, executive director of heart and vascular services, discusses how the implementation of the Philips Performance Bridge analytics platform has enabled them to better leverage cardiovascular procedure data.

Heart Failure | January 11, 2022

The University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) announced the first successful transplant of a genetically modified pig’s heart into a human patient took place Jan. 9, 2022. The innovative procedure may pave the way to eliminating the current heart transplant wait lists. The cardiologists who developed this procedure believe in the near future, an unlimited number of pig hearts could be used to allow heart transplants in any patients who need them on demand, and regardless of the medical requirements that currently limit access to human heart transplants.

Cardiac surgeons Muhammad M. Mohiuddin, M.D., scientific and program director, Cardiac Xenotransplantation Program, University of Maryland, and Bartley P. Griffith, M.D., M.D., explain how the procedure and technology works. They surgically transplanted a pig heart into the human patient after the patient had no options left and did not qualify for the heart transplant list. The patient was surviving in the hospital only through the use of an ECMO heart-lung machine.

The patient, 57-year-old Maryland resident David Bennett, was granted a FDA emergency authorization for the surgery on New Year’s Eve through its expanded access (compassionate use) provision. It is used when an experimental medical product, in this case the genetically-modified pig’s heart, is the only option available for a patient faced with end-stage heart failure, a serious or life-threatening medical condition. The authorization to proceed was granted in the hope of saving the patient’s life.

“This was a breakthrough surgery and brings us one step closer to solving the organ shortage crisis. There are simply not enough donor human hearts available to meet the long list of potential recipients,” said Griffith, the Thomas E. and Alice Marie Hales Distinguished Professor in Transplant Surgery at UMSOM. “We are proceeding cautiously, but we are also optimistic that this first-in-the-world surgery will provide an important new option for patients in the future.”

This video includes video footage from the historic procedure and interviews with Griffith, Mohiuddin and other officials at University of Maryland Medical Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

Read more in the article First Human Receives a Pig Heart Transplant.

Transplanting Pig Hearts Into Humans One Step Closer

Sponsored Videos View all 42 items

Cath Lab | January 13, 2022

Advancements in analytics and data visualizations are helping to streamline operations and improve productivity at cath labs across the country. Kootenai Health in Coeur d'Alene Idaho has a single cath lab performing more than 2,000 cases per year. Diane Penkert, executive director of heart and vascular services, discusses how the implementation of the Philips Performance Bridge analytics platform has enabled them to better leverage cardiovascular procedure data.

Information Technology | April 17, 2019

With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers' investments and best of breed systems. 

Hemodynamic Support Devices | March 06, 2019

Perwaiz Meraj, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of interventional cardiology, assistant professor, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Northwell Health System discusses the importance of hemodynamic support to safely perform a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with prior coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and comorbidities. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

In this video, Meraj discuss a complex coronary intervention of a 77-year-old woman with stage 4 CKD, prior CABG, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, who presented with angina and NSTEMI with an ejection fraction of 40 percent. The team at Northwell consulted with cardiac surgeons and the heart team, and determined that this patient was too high risk for another bypass surgery. Read more on this case.
 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

 

Heart Failure | February 13, 2019

William O'Neill, M.D., highlights best practice protocols based on Impella Quality database and real-world evidence showing improved outcomes in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Complex PCI Involving Prior CABG and Comorbidities — Interview with Perwaiz Meraj, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

Conference Coverage View all 451 items

Artificial Intelligence | January 13, 2022

Here are two examples of artificial intelligence (AI) driven pulmonary embolism (PE) response team apps featured by vendors Aidoc and Viz.AI at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 meeting.

The AI scans computed tomography (CT) image datasets as they came off the imaging system and looked for evidence of PE. If detected by the algorithm, it immediately sends an alert to the stroke care team members via smartphone messaging. This is done before the images are even loaded into the PACS. The radiologist on the team can use a link on the app to open the CT dataset and has basic tools for scrolling, windowing and leveling to determine if there is a PE and the severity. The team can then use the app to send messages, access patient information, imaging and reports. This enabled them all to be on the same page and can communicate quickly via mobile devices, rather than being required to use dedicated workstations in the hospital. 

Both vendors showed similar apps for stroke at RSNA 2019. That idea for rapid alerts, diagnosis and communications for acute care teams has now expanded to PE and also for aortic dissection and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). AI.Viz and Aidoc are looking at expanding this type of technology for other acute care team rolls, including heart failure response. 

Read more about this technology in the article AI Can Facilitate Automated Activation of Pulmonary Embolism Response Teams.

Find more AI news

Find more RSNA news and video

 

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | December 14, 2021

Jean Jeudy, M.D., professor of radiology and vice chair of informatics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, presented a late-breaking study at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting on COVID-19 linked myocarditis in college athletes. 

A small but significant percentage of college athletes with COVID-19 develop myocarditis, a potentially dangerous inflammation of the heart muscle, that can only be seen on cardiac MRI, according to the study Jeudy presented. Myocarditis, which typically occurs as a result of a bacterial or viral infection, can affect the heart’s rhythm and ability to pump and often leaves behind lasting damage in the form of scarring to the heart muscle. It has been linked to as many as 20% of sudden deaths in young athletes. The COVID-19 pandemic raised concerns over an increased incidence of the condition in student-athletes.

For the new study, clinicians at schools in the highly competitive Big Ten athletic conference collaborated to collect data on the frequency of myocarditis in student-athletes recovering from COVID-19 infection. Conference officials had required all athletes who had COVID-19 to get a series of cardiac tests before returning to play, providing a unique opportunity for researchers to collect data on the athletes’ cardiac status.

Jeudy serves as the cardiac MRI core leader for the Big Ten Cardiac Registry. This registry oversaw the collection of all the data from the individual schools of the Big Ten conference. He reviewed the results of 1,597 cardiac MRI exams collected at the 13 participating schools. 

Thirty-seven of the athletes, or 2.3%, were diagnosed with COVID-19 myocarditis, a percentage on par with the incidence of myocarditis in the general population. However, an alarmingly high proportion of the myocarditis cases were found in athletes with no clinical symptoms. Twenty of the patients with COVID-19 myocarditis (54%) had neither cardiac symptoms nor cardiac testing abnormalities. Only cardiac MRI identified the problem.

Read more details in the article COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes.

Related COVID-19 Imaging and Myocarditis Content:

Overview of Myocarditis Cases Caused by the COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes — RSNA 2021 late-breaker

VIDEO: Cardiac MRI Assessment of Non-ischemic Myocardial Inflammation Caused by COVID-19 Vaccinations — Interview with Kate Hanneman, M.D.

Cardiac MRI of Myocarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination in Adolescents

Large International Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications - RSNA 2021 late-breaker

COVID-19 During Pregnancy Doesn’t Harm Baby’s Brain

VIDEO: Large Radiology Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications — Interview with Scott Faro, M.D.

FDA Adds Myocarditis Warning to COVID mRNA Vaccine Clinician Fact Sheets

Small Number of Patients Have Myocarditis-like Illness After COVID-19 Vaccination

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | November 24, 2021

Examples of TrueView and GlassView 3D cardiac ultrasound visualization and artificial intelligence (AI) assisted automated measurements on the Philips Healthcare Epiq CV version 9.0 echo system. The latest version of the system was FDA cleared in October 2021 and shown at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting for the first time. The Epiq is an AI-based platform, starting with anatomical intelligence to identify the anatomy being images automatically. The latest version of the system adds additional AI auto measurements and quantification to save time, speed workflow and reduce intra-operator variability. 

The short video shows photo-realistic rendering of the mitral valve and a new feature where the opacity of the tissue can be dialed in our out to show glass-like ghost view of the tissue. This can make it easier to navigate or see anatomical landmarks without rotating or slicing through the image planes in the 3D rendering.

Find more RSNA news and video

Find more cardiac echo technology news
 

EP Lab | November 22, 2021

Christine Albert, M.D., MPH, professor, chair of the Department of Cardiology and the Lee and Harold Kapelovitz Distinguished Chair in Cardiology, and former president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). She spoke at the American Heart Association (AHA) 2021 meeting on innovations in electrophysiology (EP) technologies. 

Advances she discusses include:
   • Leadless pacing and CRT systems  
   • Wearable patch heart monitors and that are largely replacing traditional Holter monitors.
   • Pulsed field ablation (also called electroporation) that may improve cardiac ablations and prevent damage to underlying tissues.
   • Cryo-ablation balloons.
   • Improved EP mapping technologies.
   • and left atrial appendage (LAA) occluders.

Find more EP lab technology news

Find More AHA 2021 Late-breaking News

Cath Lab View all 313 items

Artificial Intelligence | January 13, 2022

Here are two examples of artificial intelligence (AI) driven pulmonary embolism (PE) response team apps featured by vendors Aidoc and Viz.AI at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 meeting.

The AI scans computed tomography (CT) image datasets as they came off the imaging system and looked for evidence of PE. If detected by the algorithm, it immediately sends an alert to the stroke care team members via smartphone messaging. This is done before the images are even loaded into the PACS. The radiologist on the team can use a link on the app to open the CT dataset and has basic tools for scrolling, windowing and leveling to determine if there is a PE and the severity. The team can then use the app to send messages, access patient information, imaging and reports. This enabled them all to be on the same page and can communicate quickly via mobile devices, rather than being required to use dedicated workstations in the hospital. 

Both vendors showed similar apps for stroke at RSNA 2019. That idea for rapid alerts, diagnosis and communications for acute care teams has now expanded to PE and also for aortic dissection and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). AI.Viz and Aidoc are looking at expanding this type of technology for other acute care team rolls, including heart failure response. 

Read more about this technology in the article AI Can Facilitate Automated Activation of Pulmonary Embolism Response Teams.

Find more AI news

Find more RSNA news and video

 

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | December 14, 2021

Jean Jeudy, M.D., professor of radiology and vice chair of informatics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, presented a late-breaking study at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting on COVID-19 linked myocarditis in college athletes. 

A small but significant percentage of college athletes with COVID-19 develop myocarditis, a potentially dangerous inflammation of the heart muscle, that can only be seen on cardiac MRI, according to the study Jeudy presented. Myocarditis, which typically occurs as a result of a bacterial or viral infection, can affect the heart’s rhythm and ability to pump and often leaves behind lasting damage in the form of scarring to the heart muscle. It has been linked to as many as 20% of sudden deaths in young athletes. The COVID-19 pandemic raised concerns over an increased incidence of the condition in student-athletes.

For the new study, clinicians at schools in the highly competitive Big Ten athletic conference collaborated to collect data on the frequency of myocarditis in student-athletes recovering from COVID-19 infection. Conference officials had required all athletes who had COVID-19 to get a series of cardiac tests before returning to play, providing a unique opportunity for researchers to collect data on the athletes’ cardiac status.

Jeudy serves as the cardiac MRI core leader for the Big Ten Cardiac Registry. This registry oversaw the collection of all the data from the individual schools of the Big Ten conference. He reviewed the results of 1,597 cardiac MRI exams collected at the 13 participating schools. 

Thirty-seven of the athletes, or 2.3%, were diagnosed with COVID-19 myocarditis, a percentage on par with the incidence of myocarditis in the general population. However, an alarmingly high proportion of the myocarditis cases were found in athletes with no clinical symptoms. Twenty of the patients with COVID-19 myocarditis (54%) had neither cardiac symptoms nor cardiac testing abnormalities. Only cardiac MRI identified the problem.

Read more details in the article COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes.

Related COVID-19 Imaging and Myocarditis Content:

Overview of Myocarditis Cases Caused by the COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes — RSNA 2021 late-breaker

VIDEO: Cardiac MRI Assessment of Non-ischemic Myocardial Inflammation Caused by COVID-19 Vaccinations — Interview with Kate Hanneman, M.D.

Cardiac MRI of Myocarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination in Adolescents

Large International Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications - RSNA 2021 late-breaker

COVID-19 During Pregnancy Doesn’t Harm Baby’s Brain

VIDEO: Large Radiology Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications — Interview with Scott Faro, M.D.

FDA Adds Myocarditis Warning to COVID mRNA Vaccine Clinician Fact Sheets

Small Number of Patients Have Myocarditis-like Illness After COVID-19 Vaccination

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | November 24, 2021

Examples of TrueView and GlassView 3D cardiac ultrasound visualization and artificial intelligence (AI) assisted automated measurements on the Philips Healthcare Epiq CV version 9.0 echo system. The latest version of the system was FDA cleared in October 2021 and shown at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting for the first time. The Epiq is an AI-based platform, starting with anatomical intelligence to identify the anatomy being images automatically. The latest version of the system adds additional AI auto measurements and quantification to save time, speed workflow and reduce intra-operator variability. 

The short video shows photo-realistic rendering of the mitral valve and a new feature where the opacity of the tissue can be dialed in our out to show glass-like ghost view of the tissue. This can make it easier to navigate or see anatomical landmarks without rotating or slicing through the image planes in the 3D rendering.

Find more RSNA news and video

Find more cardiac echo technology news
 

EP Lab | November 22, 2021

Christine Albert, M.D., MPH, professor, chair of the Department of Cardiology and the Lee and Harold Kapelovitz Distinguished Chair in Cardiology, and former president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). She spoke at the American Heart Association (AHA) 2021 meeting on innovations in electrophysiology (EP) technologies. 

Advances she discusses include:
   • Leadless pacing and CRT systems  
   • Wearable patch heart monitors and that are largely replacing traditional Holter monitors.
   • Pulsed field ablation (also called electroporation) that may improve cardiac ablations and prevent damage to underlying tissues.
   • Cryo-ablation balloons.
   • Improved EP mapping technologies.
   • and left atrial appendage (LAA) occluders.

Find more EP lab technology news

Find More AHA 2021 Late-breaking News

Cardiac Imaging View all 276 items

Artificial Intelligence | January 13, 2022

Here are two examples of artificial intelligence (AI) driven pulmonary embolism (PE) response team apps featured by vendors Aidoc and Viz.AI at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 meeting.

The AI scans computed tomography (CT) image datasets as they came off the imaging system and looked for evidence of PE. If detected by the algorithm, it immediately sends an alert to the stroke care team members via smartphone messaging. This is done before the images are even loaded into the PACS. The radiologist on the team can use a link on the app to open the CT dataset and has basic tools for scrolling, windowing and leveling to determine if there is a PE and the severity. The team can then use the app to send messages, access patient information, imaging and reports. This enabled them all to be on the same page and can communicate quickly via mobile devices, rather than being required to use dedicated workstations in the hospital. 

Both vendors showed similar apps for stroke at RSNA 2019. That idea for rapid alerts, diagnosis and communications for acute care teams has now expanded to PE and also for aortic dissection and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). AI.Viz and Aidoc are looking at expanding this type of technology for other acute care team rolls, including heart failure response. 

Read more about this technology in the article AI Can Facilitate Automated Activation of Pulmonary Embolism Response Teams.

Find more AI news

Find more RSNA news and video

 

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | December 14, 2021

Jean Jeudy, M.D., professor of radiology and vice chair of informatics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, presented a late-breaking study at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting on COVID-19 linked myocarditis in college athletes. 

A small but significant percentage of college athletes with COVID-19 develop myocarditis, a potentially dangerous inflammation of the heart muscle, that can only be seen on cardiac MRI, according to the study Jeudy presented. Myocarditis, which typically occurs as a result of a bacterial or viral infection, can affect the heart’s rhythm and ability to pump and often leaves behind lasting damage in the form of scarring to the heart muscle. It has been linked to as many as 20% of sudden deaths in young athletes. The COVID-19 pandemic raised concerns over an increased incidence of the condition in student-athletes.

For the new study, clinicians at schools in the highly competitive Big Ten athletic conference collaborated to collect data on the frequency of myocarditis in student-athletes recovering from COVID-19 infection. Conference officials had required all athletes who had COVID-19 to get a series of cardiac tests before returning to play, providing a unique opportunity for researchers to collect data on the athletes’ cardiac status.

Jeudy serves as the cardiac MRI core leader for the Big Ten Cardiac Registry. This registry oversaw the collection of all the data from the individual schools of the Big Ten conference. He reviewed the results of 1,597 cardiac MRI exams collected at the 13 participating schools. 

Thirty-seven of the athletes, or 2.3%, were diagnosed with COVID-19 myocarditis, a percentage on par with the incidence of myocarditis in the general population. However, an alarmingly high proportion of the myocarditis cases were found in athletes with no clinical symptoms. Twenty of the patients with COVID-19 myocarditis (54%) had neither cardiac symptoms nor cardiac testing abnormalities. Only cardiac MRI identified the problem.

Read more details in the article COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes.

Related COVID-19 Imaging and Myocarditis Content:

Overview of Myocarditis Cases Caused by the COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes — RSNA 2021 late-breaker

VIDEO: Cardiac MRI Assessment of Non-ischemic Myocardial Inflammation Caused by COVID-19 Vaccinations — Interview with Kate Hanneman, M.D.

Cardiac MRI of Myocarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination in Adolescents

Large International Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications - RSNA 2021 late-breaker

COVID-19 During Pregnancy Doesn’t Harm Baby’s Brain

VIDEO: Large Radiology Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications — Interview with Scott Faro, M.D.

FDA Adds Myocarditis Warning to COVID mRNA Vaccine Clinician Fact Sheets

Small Number of Patients Have Myocarditis-like Illness After COVID-19 Vaccination

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | November 24, 2021

Examples of TrueView and GlassView 3D cardiac ultrasound visualization and artificial intelligence (AI) assisted automated measurements on the Philips Healthcare Epiq CV version 9.0 echo system. The latest version of the system was FDA cleared in October 2021 and shown at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting for the first time. The Epiq is an AI-based platform, starting with anatomical intelligence to identify the anatomy being images automatically. The latest version of the system adds additional AI auto measurements and quantification to save time, speed workflow and reduce intra-operator variability. 

The short video shows photo-realistic rendering of the mitral valve and a new feature where the opacity of the tissue can be dialed in our out to show glass-like ghost view of the tissue. This can make it easier to navigate or see anatomical landmarks without rotating or slicing through the image planes in the 3D rendering.

Find more RSNA news and video

Find more cardiac echo technology news
 

EP Lab | November 22, 2021

Christine Albert, M.D., MPH, professor, chair of the Department of Cardiology and the Lee and Harold Kapelovitz Distinguished Chair in Cardiology, and former president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). She spoke at the American Heart Association (AHA) 2021 meeting on innovations in electrophysiology (EP) technologies. 

Advances she discusses include:
   • Leadless pacing and CRT systems  
   • Wearable patch heart monitors and that are largely replacing traditional Holter monitors.
   • Pulsed field ablation (also called electroporation) that may improve cardiac ablations and prevent damage to underlying tissues.
   • Cryo-ablation balloons.
   • Improved EP mapping technologies.
   • and left atrial appendage (LAA) occluders.

Find more EP lab technology news

Find More AHA 2021 Late-breaking News

Cardiac Diagnostics View all 74 items

Artificial Intelligence | January 13, 2022

Here are two examples of artificial intelligence (AI) driven pulmonary embolism (PE) response team apps featured by vendors Aidoc and Viz.AI at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 meeting.

The AI scans computed tomography (CT) image datasets as they came off the imaging system and looked for evidence of PE. If detected by the algorithm, it immediately sends an alert to the stroke care team members via smartphone messaging. This is done before the images are even loaded into the PACS. The radiologist on the team can use a link on the app to open the CT dataset and has basic tools for scrolling, windowing and leveling to determine if there is a PE and the severity. The team can then use the app to send messages, access patient information, imaging and reports. This enabled them all to be on the same page and can communicate quickly via mobile devices, rather than being required to use dedicated workstations in the hospital. 

Both vendors showed similar apps for stroke at RSNA 2019. That idea for rapid alerts, diagnosis and communications for acute care teams has now expanded to PE and also for aortic dissection and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). AI.Viz and Aidoc are looking at expanding this type of technology for other acute care team rolls, including heart failure response. 

Read more about this technology in the article AI Can Facilitate Automated Activation of Pulmonary Embolism Response Teams.

Find more AI news

Find more RSNA news and video

 

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | December 14, 2021

Jean Jeudy, M.D., professor of radiology and vice chair of informatics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, presented a late-breaking study at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting on COVID-19 linked myocarditis in college athletes. 

A small but significant percentage of college athletes with COVID-19 develop myocarditis, a potentially dangerous inflammation of the heart muscle, that can only be seen on cardiac MRI, according to the study Jeudy presented. Myocarditis, which typically occurs as a result of a bacterial or viral infection, can affect the heart’s rhythm and ability to pump and often leaves behind lasting damage in the form of scarring to the heart muscle. It has been linked to as many as 20% of sudden deaths in young athletes. The COVID-19 pandemic raised concerns over an increased incidence of the condition in student-athletes.

For the new study, clinicians at schools in the highly competitive Big Ten athletic conference collaborated to collect data on the frequency of myocarditis in student-athletes recovering from COVID-19 infection. Conference officials had required all athletes who had COVID-19 to get a series of cardiac tests before returning to play, providing a unique opportunity for researchers to collect data on the athletes’ cardiac status.

Jeudy serves as the cardiac MRI core leader for the Big Ten Cardiac Registry. This registry oversaw the collection of all the data from the individual schools of the Big Ten conference. He reviewed the results of 1,597 cardiac MRI exams collected at the 13 participating schools. 

Thirty-seven of the athletes, or 2.3%, were diagnosed with COVID-19 myocarditis, a percentage on par with the incidence of myocarditis in the general population. However, an alarmingly high proportion of the myocarditis cases were found in athletes with no clinical symptoms. Twenty of the patients with COVID-19 myocarditis (54%) had neither cardiac symptoms nor cardiac testing abnormalities. Only cardiac MRI identified the problem.

Read more details in the article COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes.

Related COVID-19 Imaging and Myocarditis Content:

Overview of Myocarditis Cases Caused by the COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes — RSNA 2021 late-breaker

VIDEO: Cardiac MRI Assessment of Non-ischemic Myocardial Inflammation Caused by COVID-19 Vaccinations — Interview with Kate Hanneman, M.D.

Cardiac MRI of Myocarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination in Adolescents

Large International Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications - RSNA 2021 late-breaker

COVID-19 During Pregnancy Doesn’t Harm Baby’s Brain

VIDEO: Large Radiology Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications — Interview with Scott Faro, M.D.

FDA Adds Myocarditis Warning to COVID mRNA Vaccine Clinician Fact Sheets

Small Number of Patients Have Myocarditis-like Illness After COVID-19 Vaccination

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | November 24, 2021

Examples of TrueView and GlassView 3D cardiac ultrasound visualization and artificial intelligence (AI) assisted automated measurements on the Philips Healthcare Epiq CV version 9.0 echo system. The latest version of the system was FDA cleared in October 2021 and shown at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting for the first time. The Epiq is an AI-based platform, starting with anatomical intelligence to identify the anatomy being images automatically. The latest version of the system adds additional AI auto measurements and quantification to save time, speed workflow and reduce intra-operator variability. 

The short video shows photo-realistic rendering of the mitral valve and a new feature where the opacity of the tissue can be dialed in our out to show glass-like ghost view of the tissue. This can make it easier to navigate or see anatomical landmarks without rotating or slicing through the image planes in the 3D rendering.

Find more RSNA news and video

Find more cardiac echo technology news
 

EP Lab | November 22, 2021

Christine Albert, M.D., MPH, professor, chair of the Department of Cardiology and the Lee and Harold Kapelovitz Distinguished Chair in Cardiology, and former president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). She spoke at the American Heart Association (AHA) 2021 meeting on innovations in electrophysiology (EP) technologies. 

Advances she discusses include:
   • Leadless pacing and CRT systems  
   • Wearable patch heart monitors and that are largely replacing traditional Holter monitors.
   • Pulsed field ablation (also called electroporation) that may improve cardiac ablations and prevent damage to underlying tissues.
   • Cryo-ablation balloons.
   • Improved EP mapping technologies.
   • and left atrial appendage (LAA) occluders.

Find more EP lab technology news

Find More AHA 2021 Late-breaking News

EP Lab View all 82 items

Artificial Intelligence | January 13, 2022

Here are two examples of artificial intelligence (AI) driven pulmonary embolism (PE) response team apps featured by vendors Aidoc and Viz.AI at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 meeting.

The AI scans computed tomography (CT) image datasets as they came off the imaging system and looked for evidence of PE. If detected by the algorithm, it immediately sends an alert to the stroke care team members via smartphone messaging. This is done before the images are even loaded into the PACS. The radiologist on the team can use a link on the app to open the CT dataset and has basic tools for scrolling, windowing and leveling to determine if there is a PE and the severity. The team can then use the app to send messages, access patient information, imaging and reports. This enabled them all to be on the same page and can communicate quickly via mobile devices, rather than being required to use dedicated workstations in the hospital. 

Both vendors showed similar apps for stroke at RSNA 2019. That idea for rapid alerts, diagnosis and communications for acute care teams has now expanded to PE and also for aortic dissection and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). AI.Viz and Aidoc are looking at expanding this type of technology for other acute care team rolls, including heart failure response. 

Read more about this technology in the article AI Can Facilitate Automated Activation of Pulmonary Embolism Response Teams.

Find more AI news

Find more RSNA news and video

 

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | December 14, 2021

Jean Jeudy, M.D., professor of radiology and vice chair of informatics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, presented a late-breaking study at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting on COVID-19 linked myocarditis in college athletes. 

A small but significant percentage of college athletes with COVID-19 develop myocarditis, a potentially dangerous inflammation of the heart muscle, that can only be seen on cardiac MRI, according to the study Jeudy presented. Myocarditis, which typically occurs as a result of a bacterial or viral infection, can affect the heart’s rhythm and ability to pump and often leaves behind lasting damage in the form of scarring to the heart muscle. It has been linked to as many as 20% of sudden deaths in young athletes. The COVID-19 pandemic raised concerns over an increased incidence of the condition in student-athletes.

For the new study, clinicians at schools in the highly competitive Big Ten athletic conference collaborated to collect data on the frequency of myocarditis in student-athletes recovering from COVID-19 infection. Conference officials had required all athletes who had COVID-19 to get a series of cardiac tests before returning to play, providing a unique opportunity for researchers to collect data on the athletes’ cardiac status.

Jeudy serves as the cardiac MRI core leader for the Big Ten Cardiac Registry. This registry oversaw the collection of all the data from the individual schools of the Big Ten conference. He reviewed the results of 1,597 cardiac MRI exams collected at the 13 participating schools. 

Thirty-seven of the athletes, or 2.3%, were diagnosed with COVID-19 myocarditis, a percentage on par with the incidence of myocarditis in the general population. However, an alarmingly high proportion of the myocarditis cases were found in athletes with no clinical symptoms. Twenty of the patients with COVID-19 myocarditis (54%) had neither cardiac symptoms nor cardiac testing abnormalities. Only cardiac MRI identified the problem.

Read more details in the article COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes.

Related COVID-19 Imaging and Myocarditis Content:

Overview of Myocarditis Cases Caused by the COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes — RSNA 2021 late-breaker

VIDEO: Cardiac MRI Assessment of Non-ischemic Myocardial Inflammation Caused by COVID-19 Vaccinations — Interview with Kate Hanneman, M.D.

Cardiac MRI of Myocarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination in Adolescents

Large International Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications - RSNA 2021 late-breaker

COVID-19 During Pregnancy Doesn’t Harm Baby’s Brain

VIDEO: Large Radiology Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications — Interview with Scott Faro, M.D.

FDA Adds Myocarditis Warning to COVID mRNA Vaccine Clinician Fact Sheets

Small Number of Patients Have Myocarditis-like Illness After COVID-19 Vaccination

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | November 24, 2021

Examples of TrueView and GlassView 3D cardiac ultrasound visualization and artificial intelligence (AI) assisted automated measurements on the Philips Healthcare Epiq CV version 9.0 echo system. The latest version of the system was FDA cleared in October 2021 and shown at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting for the first time. The Epiq is an AI-based platform, starting with anatomical intelligence to identify the anatomy being images automatically. The latest version of the system adds additional AI auto measurements and quantification to save time, speed workflow and reduce intra-operator variability. 

The short video shows photo-realistic rendering of the mitral valve and a new feature where the opacity of the tissue can be dialed in our out to show glass-like ghost view of the tissue. This can make it easier to navigate or see anatomical landmarks without rotating or slicing through the image planes in the 3D rendering.

Find more RSNA news and video

Find more cardiac echo technology news
 

EP Lab | November 22, 2021

Christine Albert, M.D., MPH, professor, chair of the Department of Cardiology and the Lee and Harold Kapelovitz Distinguished Chair in Cardiology, and former president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). She spoke at the American Heart Association (AHA) 2021 meeting on innovations in electrophysiology (EP) technologies. 

Advances she discusses include:
   • Leadless pacing and CRT systems  
   • Wearable patch heart monitors and that are largely replacing traditional Holter monitors.
   • Pulsed field ablation (also called electroporation) that may improve cardiac ablations and prevent damage to underlying tissues.
   • Cryo-ablation balloons.
   • Improved EP mapping technologies.
   • and left atrial appendage (LAA) occluders.

Find more EP lab technology news

Find More AHA 2021 Late-breaking News

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Artificial Intelligence | January 13, 2022

Here are two examples of artificial intelligence (AI) driven pulmonary embolism (PE) response team apps featured by vendors Aidoc and Viz.AI at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 meeting.

The AI scans computed tomography (CT) image datasets as they came off the imaging system and looked for evidence of PE. If detected by the algorithm, it immediately sends an alert to the stroke care team members via smartphone messaging. This is done before the images are even loaded into the PACS. The radiologist on the team can use a link on the app to open the CT dataset and has basic tools for scrolling, windowing and leveling to determine if there is a PE and the severity. The team can then use the app to send messages, access patient information, imaging and reports. This enabled them all to be on the same page and can communicate quickly via mobile devices, rather than being required to use dedicated workstations in the hospital. 

Both vendors showed similar apps for stroke at RSNA 2019. That idea for rapid alerts, diagnosis and communications for acute care teams has now expanded to PE and also for aortic dissection and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). AI.Viz and Aidoc are looking at expanding this type of technology for other acute care team rolls, including heart failure response. 

Read more about this technology in the article AI Can Facilitate Automated Activation of Pulmonary Embolism Response Teams.

Find more AI news

Find more RSNA news and video

 

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | December 14, 2021

Jean Jeudy, M.D., professor of radiology and vice chair of informatics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, presented a late-breaking study at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting on COVID-19 linked myocarditis in college athletes. 

A small but significant percentage of college athletes with COVID-19 develop myocarditis, a potentially dangerous inflammation of the heart muscle, that can only be seen on cardiac MRI, according to the study Jeudy presented. Myocarditis, which typically occurs as a result of a bacterial or viral infection, can affect the heart’s rhythm and ability to pump and often leaves behind lasting damage in the form of scarring to the heart muscle. It has been linked to as many as 20% of sudden deaths in young athletes. The COVID-19 pandemic raised concerns over an increased incidence of the condition in student-athletes.

For the new study, clinicians at schools in the highly competitive Big Ten athletic conference collaborated to collect data on the frequency of myocarditis in student-athletes recovering from COVID-19 infection. Conference officials had required all athletes who had COVID-19 to get a series of cardiac tests before returning to play, providing a unique opportunity for researchers to collect data on the athletes’ cardiac status.

Jeudy serves as the cardiac MRI core leader for the Big Ten Cardiac Registry. This registry oversaw the collection of all the data from the individual schools of the Big Ten conference. He reviewed the results of 1,597 cardiac MRI exams collected at the 13 participating schools. 

Thirty-seven of the athletes, or 2.3%, were diagnosed with COVID-19 myocarditis, a percentage on par with the incidence of myocarditis in the general population. However, an alarmingly high proportion of the myocarditis cases were found in athletes with no clinical symptoms. Twenty of the patients with COVID-19 myocarditis (54%) had neither cardiac symptoms nor cardiac testing abnormalities. Only cardiac MRI identified the problem.

Read more details in the article COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes.

Related COVID-19 Imaging and Myocarditis Content:

Overview of Myocarditis Cases Caused by the COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes — RSNA 2021 late-breaker

VIDEO: Cardiac MRI Assessment of Non-ischemic Myocardial Inflammation Caused by COVID-19 Vaccinations — Interview with Kate Hanneman, M.D.

Cardiac MRI of Myocarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination in Adolescents

Large International Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications - RSNA 2021 late-breaker

COVID-19 During Pregnancy Doesn’t Harm Baby’s Brain

VIDEO: Large Radiology Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications — Interview with Scott Faro, M.D.

FDA Adds Myocarditis Warning to COVID mRNA Vaccine Clinician Fact Sheets

Small Number of Patients Have Myocarditis-like Illness After COVID-19 Vaccination

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | November 24, 2021

Examples of TrueView and GlassView 3D cardiac ultrasound visualization and artificial intelligence (AI) assisted automated measurements on the Philips Healthcare Epiq CV version 9.0 echo system. The latest version of the system was FDA cleared in October 2021 and shown at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting for the first time. The Epiq is an AI-based platform, starting with anatomical intelligence to identify the anatomy being images automatically. The latest version of the system adds additional AI auto measurements and quantification to save time, speed workflow and reduce intra-operator variability. 

The short video shows photo-realistic rendering of the mitral valve and a new feature where the opacity of the tissue can be dialed in our out to show glass-like ghost view of the tissue. This can make it easier to navigate or see anatomical landmarks without rotating or slicing through the image planes in the 3D rendering.

Find more RSNA news and video

Find more cardiac echo technology news
 

EP Lab | November 22, 2021

Christine Albert, M.D., MPH, professor, chair of the Department of Cardiology and the Lee and Harold Kapelovitz Distinguished Chair in Cardiology, and former president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). She spoke at the American Heart Association (AHA) 2021 meeting on innovations in electrophysiology (EP) technologies. 

Advances she discusses include:
   • Leadless pacing and CRT systems  
   • Wearable patch heart monitors and that are largely replacing traditional Holter monitors.
   • Pulsed field ablation (also called electroporation) that may improve cardiac ablations and prevent damage to underlying tissues.
   • Cryo-ablation balloons.
   • Improved EP mapping technologies.
   • and left atrial appendage (LAA) occluders.

Find more EP lab technology news

Find More AHA 2021 Late-breaking News

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