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VIDEO: Telemedicine in Cardiology and Medical Imaging During COVID-19

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 27, 2020

Regina Druz, M.D., FASNC, a member of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Board of Directors, chairwomen of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Healthcare Innovation Section, and a cardiologist at Integrative Cardiology Center of Long Island, N.Y., explains the rapid expansion of telemedicine with the U.S. spread of novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2).

Druz spoke on the unprecedented expansion of telemedicine in the U.S. under COVID-19, seeing more use in the last two months, as opposed to the past two decades. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) previously only reimbursed for Telehealth in rural areas it determined had a shortage of doctors. However, in early March 2020, CMS dropped the geographic requirements and allowed Telehealth usage across th country as a way to mitigate person-to-person contact and keep vulnerable, older patients at home for routine check ups with doctors.

Druz has subspecialty certifications in nuclear cardiology, adult echocardiography and cardiac computed tomography (CT) and explains how Telehealth can be used to pre-screen patients and get patient sign off on procedures prior to coming in for an exam, helping speed the process in the hospital and limit personal contact.

Concerns about the rpaid spread of COVID-19 also has driven many radiology departments to convert to wider use of teleradiology to allow more radiologists to work from home and reduce person-to-person contact within the hospitals. 

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) adopt a $200 million telehealth program to support healthcare providers responding to the
ongoing coronavirus pandemic on April 2, 2020. Read more from the FCC.

CMS Expand Medicare Telehealth Benefits During COVID-19 Outbreak, including dropping requirements for rural health locations only, opening telehealth for use across the United States.

Watch the related VIDEO: Use of Teleradiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — an interview with John Kim, M.D., chairman, Department of Radiology, THR Presbyterian Plano, Texas, and chief technology officer at Texas Radiology Associates.

Recommendations from Druz are also included in the Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology Laboratories During the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic
 

 

Related COVID-19 Content:

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) — Interview with emergency physician Mike Stone, M.D.,

VIDEO: How China Leveraged Health IT to Combat COVID-19 — Interview with Jilan Liu, M.D., CEO for the HIMSS Greater China

Study Looks at CT Findings of COVID-19 Through Recovery

Experts Stress Radiology Preparedness for COVID-19

ACR Recommendations for the Use of Chest Radiography and CT for Suspected COVID-19 Cases

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

 


 

Information Technology

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 26, 2020

Regina Druz, M.D., FASNC, a member of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Board of Directors, chairwomen of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Healthcare Innovation Section, and a cardiologist at Integrative Cardiology Center of Long Island, N.Y., explains the rapid expansion of telemedicine with the U.S. spread of novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2).

Druz spoke on the unprecedented expansion of telemedicine in the U.S. under COVID-19, seeing more use in the last two months, as opposed to the past two decades. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) previously only reimbursed for Telehealth in rural areas it determined had a shortage of doctors. However, in early March 2020, CMS dropped the geographic requirements and allowed Telehealth usage across th country as a way to mitigate person-to-person contact and keep vulnerable, older patients at home for routine check ups with doctors.

Druz has subspecialty certifications in nuclear cardiology, adult echocardiography and cardiac computed tomography (CT) and explains how Telehealth can be used to pre-screen patients and get patient sign off on procedures prior to coming in for an exam, helping speed the process in the hospital and limit personal contact.

Concerns about the rpaid spread of COVID-19 also has driven many radiology departments to convert to wider use of teleradiology to allow more radiologists to work from home and reduce person-to-person contact within the hospitals. 

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) adopt a $200 million telehealth program to support healthcare providers responding to the
ongoing coronavirus pandemic on April 2, 2020. Read more from the FCC.

CMS Expand Medicare Telehealth Benefits During COVID-19 Outbreak, including dropping requirements for rural health locations only, opening telehealth for use across the United States.

Watch the related VIDEO: Use of Teleradiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — an interview with John Kim, M.D., chairman, Department of Radiology, THR Presbyterian Plano, Texas, and chief technology officer at Texas Radiology Associates.

Recommendations from Druz are also included in the Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology Laboratories During the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic
 

 

Related COVID-19 Content:

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) — Interview with emergency physician Mike Stone, M.D.,

VIDEO: How China Leveraged Health IT to Combat COVID-19 — Interview with Jilan Liu, M.D., CEO for the HIMSS Greater China

Study Looks at CT Findings of COVID-19 Through Recovery

Experts Stress Radiology Preparedness for COVID-19

ACR Recommendations for the Use of Chest Radiography and CT for Suspected COVID-19 Cases

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

 

 

FFR Technologies | March 26, 2020

James Udelson, M.D., chief of the division of cardiology, Tufts Medical Center, explains how cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans are being used to create image-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR) values to determine if a coronary lesion is flow limiting. The FFR-CT can help determine if the patient needs a stent, or if the disease can be treated with medication. Tufts uses FFR-CT evaluations on non-emergency chest pain patients to reduce the need for diagnostic catheterizations. 

 

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FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?

 

Find more news and video from Tufts Medical Center

 

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 20, 2020

An interview with Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D., FSCAI, chief, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, executive director of medicine, Cardiovascular Institute, director of  interventional cardiology and cardiac cath lab at UC San Diego Medical Center, and president of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI). He explains the how cardiology departments in the U.S. are now postponing cardiovascular procedures due to novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) containment efforts and new guidelines from Medicare calling for delay of all elective procedures in the country. 

Mahmud explains how patients are being prioritized, with acute myocardial infarction patients or others with acute, life-threatening conditions, or at high risk for a near term hospital admission, will still receive cardiac catheterizations, cardiovascular surgery or structural heart procedures for MitraClip and transcatheter aortic replacement (TAVR) under certain circumstances. All other procedures are being postponed until further notice based in the spread and infection rates of COVID-19. He said most hospitals, including his own, are moving to telehealth visits via phone or online to continue clinic work with patients, including those with chronic conditions such as heart failure.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced March 18, 2020, that all elective surgeries, and non-essential medical, surgical and dental procedures should be delayed during the coronavirus outbreak. This move is three-fold. 
   1. It is to help with containment efforts by reducing patient and family travel to hospitals, which are at the center of the COVID-19 outbreak. 
   2. Delaying procedures will help preserve and inventory of personal protective equipment (PPE), hospital beds and ventilators and other medical supplies. 
   3. With the start of social distancing and the shut down of all large gatherings, this has severely impacted blood drives and other blood donations, so the nation's blood banks have severely limited supplies.

“The reality is clear and the stakes are high — we need to preserve personal protective equipment for those on the front lines of this fight,” said CMS Administrator Seema Verma.

This will not only preserve equipment but also free up the healthcare workforce to care for the patients who are most in need. Additionally, as states and the nation as a whole work toward limiting the spread of COVID-19, healthcare providers should encourage patients to remain home, unless there is an emergency, to protect others while also limiting their exposure to the virus. 

Read Mahmud's SCAI President's letter The Evolving Pandemic of COVID-19 and Interventional Cardiology

 

Related Cardiology Related COVID-19 Content:

ACC COVID-19 recommendations for the cardiovascular care team

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

ESC Council on Hypertension Says ACE-I and ARBs Do Not Increase COVID-19 Mortality

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS)

CT Provides Best Diagnosis for Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Radiology Lessons for Coronavirus From the SARS and MERS Epidemics

Deployment of Health IT in China’s Fight Against the COVID-19 Epidemic

Emerging Technologies Proving Value in Chinese Coronavirus Fight

Radiologists Describe Coronavirus CT Imaging Features

Coronavirus Update from the FDA

CT Imaging of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia

CT Imaging Features of 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Chest CT Findings of Patients Infected With Novel Coronavirus 2019-nCoV Pneumonia 

 

Additional COVID-19 Resources for Clinicians:

   ACC COVID-19 Hub page   

   Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center with inteavtive map of cases in U.S. and worldwide 

   World Health Organization (WHO) COVID-19 situation reports

   World Health Organization (WHO) coronavirus information page

   U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) COVID-19 information page

   Centers for Disease Control (CDC) COVID-19 information page

   Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) frequently asked questions and answers (FAQs) for healthcare providers regarding COVID-19 related payments
 

 

RSNA | January 13, 2020

DAIC/ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most innovative new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 meeting. 

Technology examples include a robotic arm to perform remote ultrasound exams, integration of artificial intelligence (AI) to speed or automate radiology workflow, holographic medical imaging display screens, a new glassless digital radiography (DR) X-ray detector, augmented reality for transesophageal echo (TEE) training, moving DR X-ray images, 3-D printed surgical implants created from a patient's CT imaging, DR X-ray tomosynthesis datasets, radiation dose management and analytics software, and new computed tomography (CT) technologies.

 

Find more videos and news from RSNA 2019

 

Wearables | January 09, 2020

The Consumer Electronic Show (CES) is the world's gathering place for consumer technologies, with more than 175,000 attendees and more than 4,400 exhibiting companies. New healthcare technologies are among the top trends at CES. This video offers a quick look at the trends specific to healthcare technology.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is one of the hottest technology trends across all product across the CES floor this year. There is also discussion by key note speakers that the internet-of-things (IOT) concept introduced at CES nearly a decade ago is now morphing into a new meaning for the interconnectivity-of-things. This can be seen in healthcare products shown here and across all types of consumer and business products. 

The device technology at CES include many examples of how integrated wearables can digitally enable healthcare. The future of healthcare will include system where consumers are continuously monitored with sensors, software and services that can pinpoint digital biomarkers — earlier warning signs that predict health events. This is the prediction of Leslie Saxon, M.D., executive director of the University of Southern California (USC) Center for Body Computing (CBC), is speaking as a panelist about digital health trends and challenges in the session “Proving the Impact of Transformative Technology.” 

Saxon is a board-certified cardiologist and digital health expert who understands how developing technologies can more accurately assess wellness and human performance among elite athletes, military personnel and patients. She explained this digital healthcare model of the future is a vast contrast to the current point-of-care model.

 

 

Hemodynamic Support Devices | January 09, 2020

Richard Botto, CVT, RCSA, chief cardiovascular technologist, division of cardiology, cardiac cath lab, and Melissa Smith, RT, at Tufts Medical Center, Boston, explain the use of technology to remotely access data and waveforms on patients' temporary hemodynamic support system control consoles. 

Tufts Medical Center was one of the first hospitals to begin using the Abiomed Impella Connect technology, which enables remote smartphone access to Impella consoles. This allows a quick, remote check on patients using temporary hemodynamic support. The technology also is connected to a support center at Abiomed, so if a console or patient is experiencing issues out of the ordinary, techs can remote into the patient's Impella control console to take a look. Tuft's intensivists in the cardiac care unit (CCU) use the app to check on their patients' consoles without needing to walk into each room. 

Find VIDEOS and articles on Tufts cardiology program

 

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | December 20, 2019

This is the LVivo auto cardiac ejection fraction (EF) app that uses artificial intelligence (AI) from the vendor Dia, displayed at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2019. The user opens the app in a couple seconds the AI defines to myocardial border and calculates EF for left ventricle (LV). It is shown here integrated into the GE Healthcare VScan point-of-care-ultrasound system (POCUS).

The company also partners with Konica-Minolta to supply auto EF for ultrasound images on its cardio PACS.

Read more about the system from an ASE 2019 stud

Radiation Dose Management | December 19, 2019

 

Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM),a board member of the American College of Radiology (ACR), presented a late-breaking study on how medical imaging radiation dose has started to drop over the past decade. He is the co-chair of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measures Report (NCRP), and presented the most recent NCRP data analysis at the 2019 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting.

The new NCRP 184 report covers the period between 2006 and 2016, the period of the most current CMS data. It shows a decrease of about 20 percent in the radiation dose the U.S. population receives from medical imaging, compared to the NCRP 160 that covered the period of up to 2006.

Key findings of the study include:

   • CT dose dropped about 6 percent, despite a 20 percent increase CT scans since 2006;

   • Drop of more than 50 percent for nuclear imaging scans, mainly due to fewer procedures begin performed;

   • A 15-20 percent decrease across X-ray imaging modalities.

Mahesh says this shows the impact of using "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) principals, new dose guidelines outlined jointly by numerous medical societies, and dose reduction initiatives like Image Wisely, Image Gently, and the American College of radiology (ACR) Dose Index Registry.

He said there was growing concern a decade ago when the last council report was published, which show a steep increase in radiation dose. This was mainly due to a rapid increase in the use of computed tomography (CT) and other types of X-ray based and nuclear radiotracer medical imaging. This prompted the ACR top create the Image Wisely program and push for the use of more thoughtful imaging doses based on patient size, using the "as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA) principle. While CT dose was lowered, he said the biggest decline was in nuclear imaging.

 

 

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | December 19, 2019

This is an example of an augmented reality (AR) training system for transesophageal echo (TEE) created by the simulation company CAE. Rather than just looking at an overhead screen, this system allows the user to use a HoloLens visor to see the impact their probe manipulation has on the imaging and better shows the orientation of the ultrasound probe, the 2-D ultrasound image slice and the relation to the anatomy. It was displayed at the 2019 Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) meeting.

Read more about this technology.

Find more technology news and video from the RSNA meeting

 

 

RSNA | December 18, 2019

DAIC Editor Dave Fornell and Imaging Technology News (ITN) Consulting Editor Greg Freiherr offer a post-game report on the trends and technologies they saw on the expo floor of 2019 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting. This includes artificial intelligence (AI), augmented reality, holographic imaging, cybersecurity, and advances in digital radiography (DR) with a glassless detector plate, X-ray tomosynthesis, dual-energy X-ray and dynamic DR imaging. 

Find RSNA news and other videos

Artificial Intelligence | November 07, 2019

Piotr J. Slomka, Ph.D., FACC, research scientist in the Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Program, Department of Medicine at Cedars-Sinai, and professor of medicine in-residence of the David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA. He explains how his team at Cedars-Sinai is working on intelligent patient risk prediction algorithms that will automatically extract information from medical imaging. He spoke on artificial intelligence (AI) development for medical imaging in sessions at the 2019 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) annual meeting. 

Find more articles and video on AI

 

University of Colorado Hospital | October 02, 2019

Interview with John Carroll, M.D., director of interventional cardiology, Robert Quaife, M.D., director of advanced cardiac imaging, and James Chen, Ph.D., associate professor of medicine and director of the 3-D imaging lab at the Cardiac and Vascular Center at the University of Colorado Hospital. They discuss how the structural heart program was created and how they invested in advanced imaging to grow into one of the most advanced programs in the country. They explain how the program now incorporates transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), transcatheter mitral valve repair, transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR), left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion and transcatheter closure of holes in the heart. 

The heart team in this video stressed the need for advanced imaging to plan and guide the procedures. They explain how the center developed its own 3-D imaging software and worked with Philips healthcare to commercialize some of the technologies, including the EchoNavigator system used to fuse live angiography with live transesophageal echo (TEE).

 

Related University of Colorado Hospital Content:

Highlighting Innovation at the University of Colorado Hospital Cardiology Program

VIDEO: Evolution of Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair at the University of Colorado — Interview with John Carroll, M.D., and Robert Quaife, M.D.

VIDEO: The Role of Advanced Imaging in Structural Heart Interventions — Interview with Robert Quaife, M.D.

VIDEO: Advice For Hospitals Starting a Structural Heart Program — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

VIDEO: The Evolution of Complex PCI at University of Colorado — Interview with John Messenger, M.D., and Kevin Rogers, M.D.

VIDEO: Developing New Cath Lab Technologies With Real-time Collaboration Between Industry, Doctors

360 View of the TEE Echo Workstation During a MitraClip Procedure

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VIDEO: The Cardiac Surgeon Perspective on Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair — Interview with Joe Cleveland, M.D.

VIDEO: An Overview of PFO Closure to Treat Cryptogenic Stroke — Interview with Karen Orjuela, M.D.,

 

(This video was originally posted in May 2019 and was updated Oct. 2, 2019)

 

Cath Lab | September 28, 2019

A discussion with Nicolas Bevins, Ph.D., vice chair, physics and research, and Jessica Harrington, RCIS. They explain the use of shields, technique and use of newer angiography technologies to reduce X-ray radiation dose in the cardiac cath labs at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit.

Watch the VIDEO: Technologies and Techniques to Reduce Radiation Dose in the Cardiac Cath Lab — Interview with Akshay Khandelwal, M.D., director of medical operations at the Henry Ford Heart and Vascular Institute

Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital 

 

For more on how to reduce dose in the cath lan, read these related articles:

Cardiology Societies Call for Better Radiation Dose Tracking

Defining the Cath Lab Workplace Radiation Safety Hazard

Dose-Lowering Practices for Cath Lab Angiography

5 Technologies to Reduce Cath Lab Radiation Exposure

VIDEO: Heart Surgeon Shares Effects of Fluoroscopic Radiation Exposure

Helping Interventional Cardiologists Reduce Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

14 Ways to Reduce Radiation Exposure in the Cath Lab

 

(Editor's note - this video was originally published in September 2018 and was revised September 2019)

September 27, 2019

Akshay Khandelwal, M.D., director of medical operations at the Henry Ford Heart and Vascular Institute, Detroit, and associate professor of cardiology at Wayne State University, explains how his center has reduced X-ray radiation dose in the cardiac catheterization labs.

Watch the related VIDEO: Reducing Cath Lab Radiation Dose at Henry Ford Hospital — Discussion with Nicolas Bevins, Ph.D., vice chair, physics and research, and Jessica Harrington, RCIS, Henry Ford Hospital.

Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital 

 

For more on how to reduce dose in the cath lan, read these related articles:

Cardiology Societies Call for Better Radiation Dose Tracking

Defining the Cath Lab Workplace Radiation Safety Hazard

Dose-Lowering Practices for Cath Lab Angiography

5 Technologies to Reduce Cath Lab Radiation Exposure

VIDEO: Heart Surgeon Shares Effects of Fluoroscopic Radiation Exposure

Helping Interventional Cardiologists Reduce Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

14 Ways to Reduce Radiation Exposure in the Cath Lab

 

(Editor's note - this video was originally published in November 2018 and was revised September 2019)

 

Advanced Visualization | August 09, 2019

An example of Siemens' photo-realistic Cinematic image reconstruction. This image is from a CTA exam from a Siemens Force CT scanner. 

Vendors who offer this realistic type of CT image rendering say it is not used for diagnostics. However, the technology can be helpful when explaining things to the patient and their family, educating physicians and staff, and for surgeons, since it offers a realistic view of the anatomy that is easier for most people to understand who are not familiar with cardiac anatomy as it appears in traditional CT multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images. 

This example of software was demonstrated on the expo floor at the 2019 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) meeting. 

 

Find more news and videos from the SCCT meeting

CT Angiography (CTA) | August 08, 2019

This is a quick video example of a cardiac computed tomography (CT) exam showing a Medtronic CoreValve transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) device implanted. The image was reconstructed using Canon Medical’s Global Illumination photo-realistic rendering advanced visualization post-processing software. Vendors who offer this realistic type of CT image rendering say it is not used for diagnostics. However, the technology can be helpful when explaining things to the patient and their family, educating physicians and staff, and for surgeons, since it offers a realistic view of the anatomy that is easier for most people to understand who are not familiar with cardiac anatomy as it appears in traditional CT multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images. 

This example of software was demonstrated on the expo floor at the 2019 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) meeting. 

 

 

 

Heart Valve Technology | July 24, 2019

Joao Cavalcante, M.D., FSCCT, director of structural heart CT and cardiac MRI, Minneapolis Heart Institute, discusses transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) imaging requirements at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. SCCT held its first TMVR planning hands-on workshop, which he was involved in. TMVR is expanding with currently FDA cleared valve-in-valve (VIV) and valve-in-ring (VIR) procedures.

 

Related TMVR Content:

Interventional Imagers: The Conductors of the Heart Team Orchestra

VIDEO: The Importance of the Neo-LVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement  — Interview with Dee Dee Wang, M.D.

VIDEO: Transcatheter Structural Heart Procedure Navigation Technology Advances  — Interview with Stephen Little, M.D.

Recent Advances in Transcatheter Valve Technology

Abbott Begins Tendyne Transcatheter Mitral Valve U.S. Pivotal Trial

VIDEO: The Essentials of CT Transcatheter Valve Imaging — Interview with Jonathon Leipsic, M.D.,

New LAMPOON Technique Reduces LVOT Obstruction in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement

Find more SCCT news and videos

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 10, 2019

This is an example of a cardiac echocardiography exam performed using an iPhone and the Butterfly IQ ultrasound transducer and app. The company is exhibiting at the American Society Of Echocardiography (ASE) 2019 meeting. This is the first “ultrasound system on a chip.” The Butterfly IQ ultrasound system consists of a transducer that connects to an iPhone or iPad to record ultrasound exams. The system has 18 different applications for specialized images, including cardiac imaging, vascular, lung, abdominal and others. The apps allow for quantification and offers many of the features of larger cart-based systems. The company is working on incorporating artificial intelligence technologies to automate some processes, such as auto ejection fractions.

This technology was picked as one of the big ultrasound advances in the VIDEO: 4 Recent Advances in Echocardiography Technology and in the VIDEO: Editor's Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018.

Artificial Intelligence | July 02, 2019

Judy Hung, M.D., director of echocardiography, Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, discusses how her center is partnering to develop artificial intelligence (AI) applications to help improve image quality and speed workflow in cardiac ultrasound. She spoke to DAIC at the 2019 American Society of Echocardiography (ASE).

 

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 01, 2019

Partho Sengupta, M.D., MBBS, chief of cardiology, West Virginia Heart and Vascular Institute, explains how wearable, smartphone-based apps and medical devices, and artificial intelligence (AI) might be used to cost-effectively triage larger numbers of patients in rural areas and in the developing world for serious diseases. He spoke at the 2019 American Society Of Echocardiography (ASE) meeting.

Sengupta is involved with a pilot program using the Butterfly app and transducer to turn a smartphone into an inexpensive ultrasound system. He said the idea is to have novice ultrasound users screen more patients with these types of devices and the exams either being sent to a remote hospital for reading. He said AI algorithms also could be used to help flag any exams that show abnormalities, which would greatly speed reads and getting these patients treatment. 

Watch the related VIDEO: How Smartphones May Revolutionize Healthcare in the Developing World — Interview with Jacques Kpodonu, M.D.,

Find more news and video from ASE 2019

 

Artificial Intelligence | June 28, 2019

This is a quick example of how artificial intelligence (AI) is being integrated on the back end of cardiac ultrasound systems to help automate and speed workflows. This video segment is from the expo floor of the 2019  American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) meeting. It shows AI-based AFI automation features incorporated into the GE Vivid E95 echo system. 

Read a blog about how AI will help advance cardiac ultrasound imaging, Combatting the No. 1 Cause of Death With the Help of Artificial Intelligence and Advanced Technology.

Find more ASE 2019 coverage

 

Virtual and Augmented Reality | June 27, 2019

Roberto Lang, M.D., director of cardiac imaging at the University of Chicago, has been working with TomTec for the past three years on a project to use virtual reality (VR) to edit and view 3-D cardiac ultrasound and CT scans. He spoke at a couple sessions this week at the 2019 American Society Of Echocardiography (ASE) meeting, where doctors were able to view the session using VR headsets. The hands-on demonstration of this technology in the TomTec booth at ASE 2018 and 2019 was one of the most popular exhibits with attendees both years.

Read more about this technology in Top Technology Trends in Echocardiography at ASE 2018

See examples of VR technology for echo in the  VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative Echo Technology at ASE 2018

Here is a video example of this technology being demonstrated at ASE19.

 

Wearables | June 21, 2019

Jacques Kpodonu, M.D., FACC, cardiac surgeon, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and professor at Harvard Medical School, explains how medical devices and wearables that interface with smartphones and apps might be used to eliminate healthcare disparities in rural areas of the developed world and help raise the level of care in the developing world. He spoke at the 2019 AI-Med Cardiology conference. 

 

Related Smartphone and Wearable Content:

VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation — Interview with Robert Klempfner, M.D.

VIDEO: Use of Wearables to Track Electrophysiology Patients — Interview with Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D.

Smartphones Used to Successfully Screen More than 60,000 for Atrial Fibrillation

VIDEO: The Future of Wearables in Healthcare — Interview with Karl Poterack, M.D.

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence Applications for Cardiology — Interview with Anthony Chang, M.D.
 

Atrial Fibrillation | June 21, 2019

Sanjaya Gupta, M.D., electrophysiologist, St. Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, and assistant professor, University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Medicine, explains how his center developed an artificial intelligence (AI) application to automatically risk stratify atrial fibrillation (AFib) patients. The Epic-based app stratifies patients into those who should be placed on anticoagulation and those who are candidates for left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion. He spoke at the 2019 AI-Med Cardiology conference

His center hopes to develop similar guidelines based AI apps for other types of cardiac risk scoring. Gupta said he is looking for other centers to partner with to co-develop and test these AI apps.    

 

Related Cardiology AI Content:

VIDEO: Overview of Artificial Intelligence and its Use in Cardiology — Interview with Anthony Chang, M.D.

VIDEO: ACC Efforts to Advance Evidence-based Implementation of AI in Cardiovascular Care — Interview with John Rumsfeld, M.D.

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence Applications for Cardiology — Interview with Anthony Chang, M.D.

PODCAST: Fitting Artificial Intelligence Into Cardiology — Interview with Anthony Chang, M.D.

VIDEO: How Hospitals Should Prepare for Artificial Intelligence Implementation — Interview with Paul Chang, M.D.

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 

Artificial Intelligence | June 20, 2019

John Rumsfeld, M.D., Ph.D., FACC, American College Cardiology (ACC) chief innovation officer, and professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the ACC is working with artificial intelligence (AI) vendors to directly impact cardiac care. He said there is a tremendous amount of investment in and hype surrounding AI in healthcare, but to date there has been very little of this has translated in to changes in the way cardiology care is delivered. He outlines several areas to successfully apply AI to improve cardiovascular care and outcomes. He also discussed the current ACC efforts to advance evidence-based implementation of AI in cardiac care including applications for the NCDR.

He spoke at the 2019 Cardiology AI-Med conference

Watch the related VIDEO: Overview of Artificial Intelligence and its Use in Cardiology, an interview with Anthony Chang, M.D., chief artificial intelligence officer, Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), and founder of AIMed.  

 

 

 

Artificial Intelligence | June 18, 2019

Anthony Chang, M.D., chief artificial intelligence officer, Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), and founder, AIMed, explains the basic principles of artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine. He outlines some basic AI definitions, potential programming biases and use cases. He also explains the need for the Cardiology AI-Med conference, which held its inaugural meeting in June 2019 in Chicago.

 

Related AI Content:

Link to all the recorded AI-Med Cardiology conference sessions

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence Applications for Cardiology — Interview with Anthony Chang, M.D.

PODCAST: Fitting Artificial Intelligence Into Cardiology — Interview with Anthony Chang, M.D.

VIDEO: How Hospitals Should Prepare for Artificial Intelligence Implementation — Interview with Paul Chang, M.D.

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 

Medical 3-D Printing | May 21, 2019

This is a sample of the 3-D printed hearts and coronary anatomy models created from patient CT scans to enable anatomical assessment, device sizing and plan which devices to use and navigation for complex structural heart cases at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. These hearts are in the office of Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, at Henry Ford. She is in charge of a robust 3-D printing program to aid the structural heart program, which surpassed its 1,000th patient printed heart earlier in 2019. 

 

Realted Content With Wang:

VIDEO: Applications in Cardiology for 3-D Printing and Computer Aided Design

VIDEO: The Importance of the Neo-LVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement

Interventional Imagers: The Conductors of the Heart Team Orchestra

 

Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital 

 

Heart Valve Technology | May 20, 2019

A demonstration of how to calculate the neo-left ventricular outflow tract (neo-LVOT) on CT imaging for a transcatheter mitral valve replacement using Circle Imaging's advanced visualization software. The demonstration looks at the use of an Edward's Sapien valve being implanted for a mitral valve-in-valve procedure. The overhang of the Sapien can block the LVOT blood flow, which can be catastrophic for the patient. So, assessment of the neo-LVOT in a simulation of the implant is required prior to the procedure to find the ideal landing zone and assess if the patient's anatomy is compatible with this technique.  

Watch the related VIDEO: The Importance of the Neo-LVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement — an interview with Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, Henry Ford Hospital. 

This clip was recorded on the expo floor at the 2018 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).

 

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | May 16, 2019

This is an example of how the heart's left atrial appendage (LAA) can be evaluated for thrombus and possible transcatheter occlusion using a new cardiac ultrasound lighting technology called TrueVue. It is a movable virtual light source that can interact with the echocardiography images to show photorealistic, virtual surgical views of the cardiac anatomy. The light source can be moved anywhere in the image, including behind structures to backlight them. The technology is offered on the Philips Healthcare Epiq CVx cardiovascular ultrasound system. It was shown for the first time in the U.S. at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2018 meeting.

See another VIDEO example of the photo-realistic lighting technology showing a transcatheter ASD closure with two Amplatzer occluders.

 

Stroke | May 16, 2019

This is an example of a carotid artery reporting module from Change Healthcare at 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting. It shows how the PACS can bring in ultrasound imaging of the carotid artery and the graphical report can be modified to match the patient anatomy. The text and modifications made to the vessel tree convert into text to help auto-fill fields in the written report to help speed workflow. The vessel tree is similar to cath lab reporting systems that use a similar model of the coronaries that can be modified and helps auto complete the cath report.

 

Related Content:

VIDEO: What to Look for in PACS Workflow Efficiency

6 Key Health Information Technology Trends at HIMSS 2019

The Building Blocks of Enterprise Imaging

Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging

Find more RSNA 2018 coverage.

 

 

Cath Lab Navigation Aids | May 01, 2019

Alex Haak, Ph.D., clinical scientist at Philips Health Systems North America, is based at the University of Colorado Hospital, to work directly with physicians in the cath lab to gather immediate feedback and improve next generation fusion imaging technologies used for structural heart interventions. Philips worked with the University of Colorado to develop the EchoNavigator, which fuses 3-D anatomical imaging, live transesophageal echo (TEE) and live fluoroscopy in the cath lab to help guide structural heart procedures. Haak is permanently based at the hospital to help trouble shoot and tweak the new EchoNavigator and other interventional guidance technologies being alpha-tested there prior to final commercialization.

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

 

 

Structural Heart | April 25, 2019

Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich., explains how patient survival depends on keeping the left ventricular outflow track (LVOT) clear and using 3-D imaging to predict what the neo-LVOT will look like prior to transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures. The close proximity between the aortic and mitral valves in the left ventricle anatomy makes it critical to assess any mitral valve overhang that will obstruct blood flow out of the left ventricle. This issue has been raised in several cardiovascular imaging structural heart intervention planning sessions at conferences over the past two years, most notably at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).

Read the related article Interventional Imagers: The Conductors of the Heart Team Orchestra, which Wang helped author.

Watch the related VIDEO: Overview of the Henry Ford Hospital Structural Heart Program.

 

Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital 

 

 

Information Technology | April 17, 2019

With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers' investments and best of breed systems. 

Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019

Paul Chang, M.D., professor of radiology, vice chair of radiology informatics and medical director for enterprise imaging, University of Chicago, explains some of the issues with artificial intelligence (AI) and how hospitals can better prepare for its eventual implementation across the field medicine. A key takeaway is that hospitals need an infrastructure and roadway for AI and deep-learning algorithms to operate. Chang said most health systems will not invest directly in AI, but will invest in analytics, which Chang said uses much of the same infrastructure required by AI.

Chang spoke on this topic at an AIMed breakfast briefing seminar in Chicago April 9, 2019. Listen to a webcast of this hour and 15 minute talk.

 

 

 

Wearables | March 26, 2019

Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D., MPH, staff physician in the Section of Electrophysiology and Pacing in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart and Vascular Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, explains how wearable devices and smart phone apps can be used to aid electrophysiologists in patient care. He said the devices offer a constant remote monitoring of patient heart data, which can be helpful in diagnosing various types of arrhythmias and cardiac conditions. However, the main issue is how to sort through the large volumes of data and to figure out what the clinical value of some of this consumer data is through studies.  He spoke at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.

 

Other Cardiac Wearable Content:

VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation — Interview with Robert Klempfner, M.D.

VIDEO: The Future of Wearables in Healthcare — Interview with Karl Poterack, M.D.

 

 

Wearables | March 08, 2019

Karl Poterack, M.D., medical director, applied clinical informatics, Mayo Clinic, explains the role wearable devices will play in healthcare. He presented in several sessions at the 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.

Poterack said there is a brewing tsunami of data in wearable technologies that healthcare systems will have to figure out how to integrate in the coming years. He said the key issue with wearable data is that there needs to be outcomes data showing the value of how many steps a patient accumulates, changes in heart rate over time, or blood pressure changes in patients with specific aliments. Without this , he said there is limited value in the information. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Advanced Visualization | March 05, 2019

Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are starting to be adopted for physician training, patient education about their planned procedures, treatment planning and it is expected to be used as a procedure guidance tool in the near future. This example of AR displayed at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meetingwas among the most innovative because it allows users to "feel" the 3-D hologram of the heart. Developed by the company SoftServe., the “Touch My Heart” work-in-progress technology allows anyone wearing an AR headset to see and interact with the heart and get a touch sensation when they reach into the virtual tissue. A pad below the image is composed of dozens of ultrasound transducers that emit sound waves in the shape of the heart so users feel touch sensations when interacting with the virtual tissue.

Read the article "Virtual Reality Boosts Revenues and Patient Understanding,"

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Artificial Intelligence | March 04, 2019

Anthony Chang, M.D., chief intelligence and innovation officer, Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), and medical director of the Sharon Disney Lund Medical Intelligence and Innovation Institute. He is expert in artificial intelligence (AI). He spoke in several sessions at Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting on the integration of AI in healthcare. 

He said AI will play a big roll in imaging assessments of adult congenital heart disease to help relieve the burden on the small number of congenital cardiologists. 

Chang also explained there is a tsunami of data about to wash over healthcare as wearable devices begin to be integrated into patient care. AI will play a key role in sorting through all this data by monitoring the information to identify trends or disease markers and alert clinicians and the patient.

He was a keynote speaker at HIMSS19 with his session "Synergies Between Man and Machine — Future AI apps can be directed to help mitigate physician burnout by decreasing the EHR burden, improving medical education, and automating quality improvement."

Chang is head of the artificial intelligence organization AIMed, which hosts educational sessions and an annual meeting on AI applications in medicine.

Listen to Chang in the PODCAST: Fitting Artificial Intelligence Into Cardiology.
 

Read the article 6 Key Health Information Technology Trends at HIMSS 2019.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.