Feature | September 07, 2012| Dave Fornell

CT Auto Coronary Lesion Detection May Improve Rural Hospital Outcomes

Computer-aided detection software for computed tomography may aid in immediate heart attack rule out for chest pain patients

There has been much debate whether computer-aided detection software for computed tomography (CT) to detect coronary blockages is really a worthwhile expense. There has long been apprehension by experienced cardiologists and radiologists who can easily read coronary CT angiography (CCTA) scans for plaque burden. However, the technology may have a niche application for immediate STAT reads of chest pain patients during off-hours, especially at rural medical centers.

Computer-aided detection software is used as a second set of eyes when reading radiology studies for breast or lung cancer and virtual colonoscopy. The software highlights areas that have a high probability of disease based on the optical review data from thousands of radiology studies.

Coronary artery disease blockages are more clear-cut to visualize on good-quality CCTA scans by experienced readers, rather than the detection of the sometimes-subtle shadows of lung cancer. But, at rural hospitals or emergency departments where radiologist experience reading CCTA might be limited, this software may offer a better triage tool. The software can immediately detect if there is coronary disease or not. The software was highlighted during a recent session the Society of Cardiac Computed Tomography (SCCT) annual meeting.

While a diagnosis should not be made solely by software, the absence of disease detection on a CT by the system will generally rule out coronary artery disease, said Robert Schwartz, M.D., FACC, professor of medicine at University of Minnesota Medical School, medical director at the Minnesota Cardiovascular Research Institute and a cardiologist at the Minneapolis Heart Institute. He said CT has a proven, high degree of negative predictability, so if CCTA scan shows there is no evidence of heart disease, it is extremely likely restricted blood flow in the coronary arteries is not the cause of chest pain.

Rcadia Medical Imaging offers the COR Analyzer automated computer-aided detection software for CCTA. It detects coronary lesions, highlights the anatomy and the measures the size of the lesion and degree of anatomical vessel blockage. 

“It’s not perfect, but it’s pretty good,” Schwartz said.

Related Content

Children's Hospital Los Angeles, CHLA, Frank Ing, 3-D printed model, pulmonary artery

Pediatric interventional cardiologist Frank Ing, M.D., chief of the Division of Cardiology and co-director of the Heart Institute at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Photo courtesy of Children's Hospital Los Angeles.

Feature | 3-D Printing| February 22, 2017
When Children’s Hospital Los Angeles cardiologists found evidence that a portion of Nate Yamane’s pulmonary artery they...
augmented reality, virtual reality, medical imaging, surgery, operating room

A 2-D view of what operators see when viewing actual 3-D medical images in the HoloLens augmented reality system using TeraRecon's new software.

Technology | Advanced Visualization| February 21, 2017
TeraRecon debuted their new high-performance, cloud-based augmented reality solution, the HoloPack Portal, at the 2017...
HeartFlow FFRct Analysis, NICE guidance, U.K., United Kingdom, guidelines, stable chest pain
News | CT Angiography (CTA)| February 14, 2017
The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom recently issued guidance for use of...
Vital Images, Vitrea VNA connect deployment, Olea Pulse, Modular Enterprise Imaging, HIMSS17, HIMSS 2017
Technology | Enterprise Imaging| February 09, 2017
Vital Images Inc. will feature its Vitrea Modular Enterprise Imaging interoperability solutions at the 2017 Healthcare...
Technology | Advanced Visualization| February 06, 2017
February 6, 2017 — At the Society of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) 20th Annual Scientific Sessions, GE Healthcare
CT, computed tomography, IV contrast media, acute kidney injury risk, Annals of Emergency Medicine study

A new study in Annals of Emergency Medicine finds no association between intravenous contrast media used in computed tomography (CT) and kidney damage. Roughly 80 million doses of IV contrast media are given every year. Credit: American College of Emergency Physicians

News | Contrast Media| January 30, 2017
Intravenous contrast media (typically iohexol or iodixanol) used in computed tomography (CT) does not appear to be...
Arterys, Cardiac MRI, cardiac MRI advances

An example of the Arterys blood flow imaging assessment software that can help automate cardiac MRI. 

Feature | Cardiac Imaging| January 16, 2017 | Dave Fornell
Each year imaging system manufacturers use the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting at the end of the
Arterys, Cardio DL cloud application, automated ventricle segmentation, MRI, FDA clearance
Technology | Advanced Visualization| January 09, 2017
Arterys has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its Arterys Cardio DL...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Cardiac Imaging| January 06, 2017
ITN and DAIC Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most innovative new technologies being displayed on the
Materialise, benefits of 3-D printing, RSNA 2016, workshops
News | 3-D Printing| December 19, 2016
Materialise NV showcased the benefits of 3-D-printed anatomical models for radiologists and their patients during the...
Overlay Init