News | EP Lab | June 08, 2016

All-Women Panel Discusses Cardiac Rhythm Management at Cardiostim Conference

Symposium organized by EPIC Alliance to encourage women to join the field of electrophysiology

EPIC Alliance, women in electrophysiology, cardiac rhythm management, Cardiostim 2016 conference

June 8, 2016 — Physicians presented original research and real-world clinical evidence at a symposium organized by the Electrophysiologist International Community (EPIC) Alliance, an initiative to promote women in the field of electrophysiology. The symposium took place during the Cardiostim 2016 conference, June 8-11 in Nice, France.

Physicians spoke about remote monitoring, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) guidelines, implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) programming and new approaches to defibrillation and pacing during the symposium, titled “Hear the Experts: Contemporary Issues in Cardiac Rhythm Management.” Fewer than 10 percent of electrophysiologists (EPs) in Europe and the United States are women, and even fewer speak at scientific congresses or hold leadership positions in hospitals or professional associations.

Anja Schade, M.D., Helios Clinic, Erfurt, Germany, kicked off the symposium by discussing how ICDs should be programmed for primary and secondary prevention. Gemma Pelargonio, M.D., Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, went on to question whether the CRT guidelines are too restrictive.

Laura Vitali Serdoz, M.D., Fürth Clinic, Germany, told the audience about the real-world benefits of remote monitoring. “I’d highly recommend my colleagues start a remote monitoring program, especially for heart failure patients,” she said. “Over the last several years, it has led to significant health benefits in patients and improved our clinic's daily workflow. A lack of reimbursement in some countries is limiting the technology's wider utilization.”

Finally, Jordana Kron, M.D,. Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Pauley Heart Center, Richmond, Va., spoke about the next chapter of defibrillation and pacing with innovations such as leadless pacemakers.

“We all need role models to look up to and learn from,” said Andrea Russo, M.D., Cooper University Hospital, Camden, New Jersey, who co-chaired the session. “Panels like these show young physicians that women with different styles and personalities can become successful electrophysiologists. I hope that this encourages more women to choose the exciting and rewarding field of electrophysiology.”

The EPIC Alliance is a global network of over 200 women EPs and cardiac device specialists. Founded in 2010, its aims to diversify the medical field by promoting women in their professional and personal lives. The alliance fosters peer support, clinical research opportunities and career development to help women gain leadership positons in their clinics, professional associations and at scientific congresses.

Biotronik sponsors EPIC with an educational grant.

For more information: www.epic-alliance.com

Related Content

A new infection risk scoring system has been developed based on data from the large PADIT Trial.[1] The new scoring system was presented as a follow up to that study during a late-breaking session at Heart Rhythm 2019, the Heart Rhythm Society's 40th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Figure 1: The PADIT infection risk score ranging from 0 to 14 points classified patients into three risk groups, low (0-4), intermediate (5-6) and high (≥7). The risk groups had rates of hospitalization for infection of 0.51%, 1.42% and 3.41%, respectively 

News | EP Lab | May 15, 2019
May 15, 2019 — A new infection risk scoring system has been developed based on data from the large PADIT Trial.[1] Th
Studies Find Race and Gender Disparities in Implantable Heart Devices
News | EP Lab | May 15, 2019
May 15, 2019 - Three new studies show that patients who are medically indicated for implantable heart devices, includ
Heart Rhythm 2019 study shows travelers with common cardiac devices can pass through without restrictions or precautions. HRS 2019, #HRS #HRS19

A new study shows travelers with common cardiac devices can pass through airport body scanners without restrictions or precautions.

News | EP Lab | May 14, 2019
May 14, 2019 – Results from new research show that passengers with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), su
News | EP Lab | May 13, 2019
May 13, 2019 – Results from a new survey are the first to report a large discrepancy in patient’s knowledge of their
Concerto CRT-D and Virtuoso ICD implantable cardiac devices are among several Medtronic electrophysiology devices included in a safety alert because of their lack of cybersecurity measures to avoid hacking, according to the FDA.

Concerto CRT-D and Virtuoso ICD implantable cardiac devices are among several Medtronic electrophysiology devices included in a safety alert because of their lack of cybersecurity measures to avoid hacking, according to the FDA.

Feature | EP Lab | March 22, 2019
March 22, 2019 — The U.S.
Medtronic Tyrx Envelope Significantly Reduces Major Infections in Cardiac Implantable Device Patients
News | EP Lab | March 20, 2019
Results from the landmark Worldwide Randomized Antibiotic Envelope Infection Prevention Trial (WRAP-IT) demonstrated...
Videos | EP Lab | February 27, 2019
This is a virtual heart with the same electrophysiology characteristics as the real patient being developed to help o
Seth Worley, M.D., senior consultant, section of cardiac electrophysiology, MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute, developed tools and techniques to optimize transvenous left ventricular (LV) lead implantation, including the I-CRT approach. Here he holds the tools that he personally developed for left ventricular lead implantation to treat heart failure. Photo courtesy of MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute at MedStar Washington Hospital Center.

Seth Worley, M.D., senior consultant, section of cardiac electrophysiology, MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute, developed tools and techniques to optimize transvenous left ventricular (LV) lead implantation, including the I-CRT approach. Here he holds the tools that he personally developed for left ventricular lead implantation to treat heart failure. Photo courtesy of MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute at MedStar Washington Hospital Center.

Feature | EP Lab | January 21, 2019 | Matthew S. McKillop, M.D., FACC, FHRS, and Seth J. Worley, M.D.
Interventional...
An implanted ICD showing its three venous leads. These multiple CRT leads can cause issues when they need to be replaced and are abandoned with new leads put over them in the SVC, which may require lead extraction.

An implanted ICD showing its three leads in the venous system. 

Feature | EP Lab | January 13, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
To extract or abandon broken or infected implantable, venous...
Overlay Init