News | Cardiac Imaging | August 18, 2017

ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis

Document crafted by multidisciplinary team of experts focuses on role of 18F-FDG PET/CT

ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis

August 18, 2017 — The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) has released a joint expert consensus document with the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) on the role of 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in cardiac sarcoid detection and therapy monitoring.

The recognition that randomized prospective trials are not available for this rare disease and are unlikely to be conducted has prompted the Cardiovascular Council of the SNMMI and the ASNC to assemble a multidisciplinary team of experts not only in imaging but also in clinical cardiology, cardiac electrophysiology, heart failure, and systemic sarcoidosis to develop this comprehensive consensus statement. 

The full document can be read here.

For more information: www.asnc.org, www.snmmi.org

 

Read the article "Recent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology." 

Watch the VIDEO "PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology." An interview with Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging. 

Watch the VIDEO "Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging." A discussion with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. 

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