News | November 15, 2013

Aspirin Ineffective in 20 Percent of Heart Disease Patients

Study highlights importance of measuring thromboxane biomarker to determine aspirin response

antiplatelet therapy clinical trial blood test platelet function corgenix

November 15, 2013 — A study conducted in Ireland found that aspirin does not adequately protect 20 percent of patients with established heart disease. Corgenix Medical Corp., developer of the AspirinWorks Test for aspirin effect, said the study adds more evidence to the importance of accurately measuring aspirin response by measuring levels of the biomarker thromboxane.
 
“These and other major trials have established that the failure of patients to respond to the intended beneficial effect of aspirin may be a key factor in putting millions at increased risk of heart attack and stroke,” said Douglass Simpson, president and CEO, Corgenix. “The AspirinWorks Test accurately measures thromboxane levels in healthy individuals, allowing physicians to identify its potential interference with aspirin’s ability to help reduce heart attack and stroke risk.”
 
The Irish study conducted by the Irish Heart Foundation’s National Cardiovascular and Stroke Research Network (NCSRN) prospectively evaluated aspirin response in 700 patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) by measuring thromboxane levels. Results showed that age, high blood pressure, weight and alcohol consumption were significant risk factors for a poor response to aspirin. Full study results were presented at the 64th Irish Cardiac Society Annual Scientific Meeting in Killarney, Ireland.
 
AspirinWorks is the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared test that measures the urinary biomarker 11-dehydro thromboxane B2 (11dhTxB2) to determine aspirin effect in apparently healthy individuals. The test identifies those individuals who have elevated thromboxane levels despite taking a daily aspirin dose, with studies showing up to 25 percent of individuals not seeing the expected beneficial effects of aspirin.
 
For more information: www.corgenix.com, www.aspirinworks.com, www.irishheart.ie

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