News | June 04, 2013

CMS Reports Reduced Cost Growth Will Extend Medicare Solvency

CMS says a number of factors have contributed to the improved outlook

June 4, 2013 — The Medicare trustees have projected that the trust fund that finances Medicare’s hospital insurance coverage will remain solvent until 2026, two years beyond what was projected in last year’s report.

“The Medicare Hospital Insurance trust fund is projected to be solvent for longer, which is good news for beneficiaries,” said Marilyn Tavenner, Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). “Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, we are taking important steps to improve the delivery of care for seniors with Medicare. These reforms aim to reduce spending while improving the quality of care, and they are an important down payment on solving Medicare’s long-term financial issues.”

A number of factors have contributed to the improved outlook, including lower-than-expected Part A spending in 2012, and lower projected Medicare Advantage program costs. Recent data from the Medicare Advantage program indicate that certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act will help reduce the growth of spending in this program by more than was previously projected. Partially offsetting these lower spending projections are somewhat lower projected levels of tax revenue.

Medicare spending per beneficiary has grown quite slowly over the past few years and is projected to continue growing slowly over the next several years. From 2010 to 2012, Medicare spending per beneficiary grew at 1.7 percent annually, more slowly than the average rate of growth in the Consumer Price Index, and substantially more slowly than the per capita rate of growth in the economy. Thanks in part to the cost controls implemented in the Affordable Care Act, spending is projected to continue to grow slower than the overall economy for the next several years.

The benefits of this slower growth accrue to both taxpayers and beneficiaries. For example, although the Part B premium for 2014 will not be determined until later this year, the preliminary estimate in the report indicates that it will remain unchanged from the 2013 premium.

For more information: www.cms.gov

 

Related Content

SCCT Announces 2019 Gold Medal Award Recipients

Jonathon Leipsic, M.D., (left) and Gilbert Raff, M.D., (right)

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 05, 2019
The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) will present the 2019 Gold Medal Award to Jonathon Leipsic, M....
Johns Hopkins Medicine First in U.S. to Install Canon Medical's Aquilion Precision
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 26, 2019
Johns Hopkins Medicine now has access to the first Ultra-High Resolution computed tomography (UHR CT) system for...
Siemens Healthineers Debuts Cardiovascular Edition of Somatom go.Top CT
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 14, 2019
Siemens Healthineers will introduce the Somatom go.Top Cardiovascular Edition, a new version of its established...
Canon Medical Introduces Deep Learning-Based CT Image Reconstruction
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 27, 2019
Canon Medical Systems recently introduced AiCE (Advanced intelligent Clear IQ Engine), a deep convolutional neural...
SCCT Releases New Guideline for CT Use During TAVR
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2019
The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) has released a new expert consensus document for computed...
A CT calcium scoring image showing calcified plaques in coronary vessel segments. The higher the calcium content of the vessels, the high risk the patient is for a heart attack event. CAC exam

A CT calcium scoring image showing calcified plaques in coronary vessel segments. The higher the calcium content of the vessels, the higher risk the patient is for a heart attack event. Image courtesy of Canon Medical Systems.

Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | October 17, 2018 | Dave Fornell, Editor
A picture is worth a thousand words, and to patients concerned about their health, detailed images of the coronary an
Abdominal Aortic Calcification May Signal Future Heart Attack

Image from computed tomography (CT) colonography shows segmented abdominal aortic calcification measured with semiautomated CT tool on coronal image. Within region of interest over aorta selected by user, tool automatically segments and quantifies aortic calcification (shown in blue). 

Image Credit: O’Connor S D, Graffy P M, Zea R, et al. Does nonenhanced CT-based quantification of abdominal aortic calcification outperform the Framingham Risk Score in predicting cardiovascular event sin asymptomatic adults? Radiology doi: 10.1148/radiol.2018180562. Published online Oct. 2, 2018. © RSNA.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | October 12, 2018
Computed tomography (CT)-based measures of calcification in the abdominal aorta are strong predictors of heart attacks...
Siemens Healthineers Announces First U.S. Install of Somatom go.Top CT
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | September 17, 2018
September 17, 2018 — The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus recently became the first healthcare
Overlay Init